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Quick-maturing Plants: 5 Fast Growing Vegetables to Try

5316 ratings | 677887 views
As vegetables are harvested, gaps will inevitably appear in your garden. However, leaving bare soil exposes your garden to weeds and can make it more prone to erosion, plus it means your garden isn’t being as productive as it could be. Fill those gaps with quick-growing vegetables and you can sneak in a useful extra crop before the end of the year - or even before your fall crops are planted. In this video we identify 5 fast-maturing vegetables to try in your summer garden and provide simple tips to help you enjoy your harvest as quickly as possible. If you've noticed any pests or beneficial insects in your garden lately please report them to us at http://bigbughunt.com If you love growing your own food, why not take a look at our online Garden Planner which is available from several major websites and seed suppliers: http://www.GrowVeg.com http://gardenplanner.motherearthnews.com http://gardenplanner.almanac.com and many more... To receive more gardening videos subscribe to our channel here: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=GrowVeg
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Text Comments (168)
AMARJIT MALHI (4 days ago)
Very good video. I have only recently got into the good life and now growing tomatoes, green chilli, cabbage, coriander and looking to grow the vegetables you mentioned. I'd like to be dependent on the organic food I grow to reduce the money I waste on tasteless commercially grown produce.
Thanks for sharing i love gardening so much!!
My Homemade Life (1 month ago)
Love your videos :) Have subscribed too
the order of masters (2 months ago)
Ok norton
Topher Grace (2 months ago)
Is that the music from America’s test kitchen? Will there be a blinder review at the end?
Boz 2011 (2 months ago)
Nice, thanks
Stonemansteve II (2 months ago)
You don't need covers are traps, all you need is diatomaceous earth. You sprinkle some over plants and on the soil as well, and even though it feels like talcom powder to us, the microscopic fossils cut in the bug's exoskeleton and they dry out and die. They don't die right away, so you don't see a bunch of dead bugs or slugs, but your plants will have much less holes in their leaves afterwards. You just have to sprinkle some more on after it rains.
carspotting europ (5 months ago)
Hello everyone! This video was really helpfull for me. You can grow your organic food even faster by using this proven product. http://bit.ly/2D2SxaP
Samantha Plumadore (6 months ago)
I love watching & re-watching your videos ea yr refreshing as I'm planning & preparing to start seed & plant out the garden. Such great info, ideas & tips that most overlook. Your soil looks so wonderful. I've been adding to & bettering my soil overtop of our red clay here in Va for about 6yrs this location. We have aphids even now in Feb! All yr where I had a layer of plastic protecting some spinach, swiss chard, cabbage, etc thru winter. I just removed the plastic to allow the snow, cold to hopefully kill them asap prior to warmth & planting out. Japanese beetles & spider mites have been the most devastating in 2016, every yr spider mites, squash vine borers 2017 for my 1st exper with their damage/ destruction along with the s mites! I'm curious if u have any ideas on how I can try to rid these nasty little almost invisible spider mites? I've tried DE, & the organic store bought & homemade sprays as well as a very detrimental bug spray that made no difference in the amt of spider mites or their cont'd damage. I'm curious if there's a way to attempt disrupting these bugs below soil prior to spring when they all erupt & begin demolition again
GrowVeg (6 months ago)
Check out the advice on bringing spider mites under control: http://bigbughunt.com/bug-guides/us-and-canada/spider-mite/ Preventing Problems:Spider mites thrive under hot, dusty conditions, so keeping the garden watered helps prevent problems. Spider mites also have numerous natural enemies that are easily wiped out by the use of pesticides. In organic gardens where beneficial insects are encouraged, spider mite problems are rare. Managing Outbreaks:Clip off and compost heavily infested leaves, because they will not recover. Thoroughly spray the plants with a fine spray of water, taking care to rinse leaf undersides. If the mites persist, repeat the water spray and then cover plants with an old sheet or other lightweight cloth for a couple of days. Shade and moist, cool conditions will seriously set back spider mites. To save a prized plant, an oil-based fungicide such as neem oil is the best intervention.
The Novice Gardener (6 months ago)
Love love love your videos!! I’m new to gardening and growing vegetables so these vids are very useful. Check out my YouTube channel where I’m building a 200sqm plot. 🙂
GrowVeg (6 months ago)
We wish you all the best of luck with your new plot - enjoy!
TheRipper999 (10 months ago)
pause on 0:05...
Vayona Narekuli (11 months ago)
I only came here to prepare for the zombie apocalypse
GrowVeg (10 months ago)
Keep growing - the zombies aren't interested in/can't garden, so you'll be one step ahead!
Anne Fricker (11 months ago)
Thank you thank you thank you! At last a video without the waffle. I hate videos that are all music and no speech and I hate videos where you get a life story before if ever they get to the point. Yours are fast and punchy. Could do without the music otherwise they are full of content and deal with the subject quickly. Thank you.
Jomarley Duncan (11 months ago)
I started some okra for the month of July, they grew up really fast 7 to 10 days top. 👍👌
GrowVeg (11 months ago)
That's super-quick!
Fright Foo (1 year ago)
Oh, ello
Sugi bliss (1 year ago)
Hello I love the video and very useful. I like to ask you couple questions that I live in Arizona where I get nice sunny days and some monsoon rain and can you recommend me some veggies to grow faster. And 2nd i see a cardboard under the soil in the video and pls advise what purpose of the cardboards and can I use it under the soil before I planting.
GrowVeg (1 year ago)
There are quite a few plants you can grow from summer onwards in the Southwest. These include: basil, beans, coriander/cilantro, corn, cucumbers, dill, peppers (from already part-established plants), summer and winter varieties of squash, and tomatoes (again, from plants that are already part-established). You may find that providing some shade, which will cool conditions a bit, will allow you to grow more salads and some of the quick-maturing plants mentioned in this video. Cardboard over the soil can help to suppress weeds. It can be laid over paths before covering in, for example, wood chips. Or you can lay it over bare areas of soil to keep weeds in check while the ground isn't in use. This can then be removed before planting. Most cardboard generally rots down over a few months, so it's a great idea for laying over bare ground over winter, with compost or manure on top. By spring it will have all rotted down and you'll have lovely, organic-rich soil to grow in.
TheTrueabundance (1 year ago)
I just wish you could make a video for hotter climates. I'm in zone 10 in South Spain and we can only plant salads, beans, and spinach in the late autumn and over winter, otherwise they just bolt :( I've planted cucumbers for an autumn harvest, and have malabar spinach growing, but have you any other ideas for me to fill the gaps now?
GrowVeg (1 year ago)
In very warm climates such as yours there are still plenty of crops that can be planted in the heat of summer to crop later on in the autumn. These include, for example, basil, beans, coriander/cilantro, corn, cucumbers, dill, peppers (from already part-established plants), summer and winter varieties of squash, and tomatoes (again, from plants that are already part-established).
Surfview (1 year ago)
I would add for #6 MORINGA. In less than 6 weeks, I've been harvesting leaves off of these fast growing Moringa. I have 43 growing in my Phoenix, Arizona yard. So, I can harvest every day. Pruning them 9" off the ground after they are 3' tall makes them fork and you get double the growth and double the yield. Moringa will grow 15' in one season. And if you use the PKM-1 hybrid Moringa, then you can have the 3' pods grow and dry before the frost. They are perennials, so they will likely grow back the next year if there is a frost. Zones 8a+ should allow them to grow back without effort. They are drought tolerant after two years. So, they are perfect for any yard in the sunbelt for USA. The seeds can be used to purify water. The leaves are super nutritious and are used by famished populations in impoverished and malnutrition affected nations.
GrowVeg (1 year ago)
Brilliant! Thanks so much for sharing. Living in the UK I've never had the pleasure of growing it.
Harry Porter (1 year ago)
Thank you, I'm on it
Trish Moon (1 year ago)
Great reminder! Thank you! Each year I forget to sow my carrots in containers...I'm out of seeds and containers for now...so I'll try next year!
Mike Hanner (1 year ago)
i just started my garden this year and so far no bugs doing any damage to it. but they are protecting it and making sure the ground is getting moved to let in air and water and to make room for roots
Great vegies for growing from seed. Another great, fast and free option is to replant the ends of spring onions, celery and living fancy lettuce vegies from the grocery. 😉
Hardik Patel (1 year ago)
ho
Maxwell Dacre (1 year ago)
very helpful video :D you just earned yourself a like on the video :)
GrowVeg (1 year ago)
Awesome, many thanks!
arsu balami (1 year ago)
can you grow carrot and beans in mid june.... how deep pot should be for the beans...
GrowVeg (1 year ago)
Yes you can! Go for shorter-rooted, quick-growing carrot varieties. The pots should be about 10 inches / 25cm deep at least. You can start off French/fine beans, particularly dwarf varieties which will be quicker to crop. The pots should be a similar depth. Get sowing right now!
AlexP_IsGaming (1 year ago)
Carrots
GrowVeg (1 year ago)
Yes, certain stump-rooted varieties of carrot are very quick.
Kevin Sheffield (1 year ago)
Mange Toute or Sugar Snap peas anyone?
Courtney Thomas (1 year ago)
Thanks. I loved this video!
Hong Leah (1 year ago)
we're growing spinach and using some old carrot tops
Wandering Rockhounds (1 year ago)
One could always grow multiple crops with staggered harvests in the same plot to be sure there will be no bare soil
Mushtaq Ahmad (1 year ago)
Masha'Allah very good thanks so much
marilyn gandhi (1 year ago)
I am in Ipswich Australia... a beginner gardener, haven't set up yet but have a good size backyard, thank you for your video...
Jasmine Jade (1 year ago)
Zucchini!
Clarissa (1 year ago)
is it ok to partner a rice??
GrowVeg (1 year ago)
Rice needs very wet conditions, so I would suggest it's unsuitable as a partner to most other vegetables.
Grow With Kit (1 year ago)
some really good info thanks
theuglykwan (1 year ago)
Do those row covers allow the rain or water from the hose/watering can to go through or do you have to lift it quickly to water and recover? Just wondered if they can keep slugs out or do you have to cover every inch of the edge of the fabric? I'd recommend Komatsuna and Mizuna greens.
gem trash (1 year ago)
my first (successful ) plant I grew where carrots they where tiny but yummy
GrowVeg (1 year ago)
Watch out for our next video - it's on growing yummy carrots!
Asian Goddess (1 year ago)
I love your videos. Thank you
Danny Dang (1 year ago)
This video is informative, i would like to grow and open a business supplying cheap fresh veggies someday so that kids in United States can get enough amount of Veggies instead of fast food stuffs :D
Danny Dang .. don't you understand.. if their parents were interested in healthy children, they would be supplying healthy food for their children.... good luck!!
GrowVeg (1 year ago)
That's a very worthwhile ambition. Hope you follow your dream. We could all do with more fresh veggies and fruit.
Manny Lopez (1 year ago)
Very informative ty
sebastian brosche (1 year ago)
Polyculture looks so much more sensible than monoculture. Great tips though!
Barbarajean Watts (1 year ago)
I live in an apartment on the 7th floor. I try to garden a bit. in containers.
Barbarajean Watts (1 year ago)
no it is not hard. A little planning knowledge and patience helps. At present I grow microgreens many kinds. I grow lettuces different kinds for baby greens and pea shoots. All are good for you and can be used in many different dishes. Most of the information I needed is on you tube. Try I am sure you will be happy with the results.
The Mayor (1 year ago)
Barbarajean Watts is it hard?
Hussein Jimale (1 year ago)
very useful video thanks
Maryanna Wells (1 year ago)
very inspiring video
linny hilaken (1 year ago)
I'd love to see a tour of your whole garden
The Survivor (1 year ago)
Subbed!
tim h (1 year ago)
brilliant video a must watch thanks
RX LEE (1 year ago)
Great! All these vegetables can be grown in tropical Singapore!!! :)
I've grown most of them in temperate Missouri! They're all great crops for most of the world!
Dee Smith (1 year ago)
I could hear you when you were talking face to face with the camera but other than that I could not hear you well
GrowVeg (1 year ago)
Apologies, we will try to get our sound levels more evenly balanced for future videos.
Lee Sarah (1 year ago)
This video is great and helpful.
olly smith (1 year ago)
So this is what I shall grow drying a zombie apocalypse thanks
Ash 03 (1 year ago)
you forgot chayote
Brooks Anderson (1 year ago)
SI1 root crops are good for you. :-)
coco1101 (1 year ago)
I want to thank you for sharing your skill and knowledge with us. I feel enthused to try so salad greens and rocket/arugula. I did grow some tomatoes in the past along with some haricot vert years ago. We live in the South of the US and it is very hot here which makes growing a chore as most days in summer you need to water twice daily if you want any harvest. Thanks again.
curly kat (1 year ago)
coco1101 I hear heavy mulching and hugelkultur beds really cut back on watering.
GrowVeg (1 year ago)
You're very welcome indeed. Good luck with all of your growing. Salad greens and arugula are a great place to start again as they're so quick growing. Have fun!
nyan cat 123 (1 year ago)
I grew radishes and the took a long time to grow .
Braxton Dennis (1 year ago)
nothing happens if you eat a GMO apple
Elroy Pereira (1 year ago)
How to get the land ready for vegetables
nyan cat 123 (1 year ago)
Also i've got a question : If I buy apples in the store that dosent say they are organic , and then I plant the seeds from that apple in to the ground , and then I eat the apples that grew from that tree what would happen ? So basically what im trying to say is what happens if I eat a gmo apple
GrowVeg (1 year ago)
It can depend on the weather. In optimal conditions they can be ready in just 3-4 weeks, but will take longer in cooler weather.
GOH BOMBA (1 year ago)
Thank for the video
Jeeya (1 year ago)
Very helpful video Thanks
bicanoo_magic (1 year ago)
Great vid. I solved my carrot fly issue by planting the carrots into an old plastic kitchen pedal bin which is very tall as the carrot fly can't fly higher than 50cm! No need for nets!
bicanoo_magic (1 year ago)
I used to plant them on top of old school desks. that was VERY effective. But as I said in smaller quantities I use high-sided kitchen pedal bins, still on the ground but the sides are too high for the fly. They have a maximum ceiling height of 500mm! Which in micro fly terms is a ceiling height of 30,000feet, ie. same as a 747 or A380!!! LOL So its like growing carrots in the stratosphere!!
GrowVeg (1 year ago)
Brilliant idea. Raising carrots off the ground is a great way to thwart these low-flying insects.
El Jugador (1 year ago)
So all these can be harvesteded when such date passes?
GrowVeg (1 year ago)
Yes, after the stated time for each crop they should be ready for harvest. However, this is only a guide - sometimes they may be ready a little later, and other times a little sooner. You should best your harvesting time on when the plants have reached the desired size.
Anita Walters (2 years ago)
Can I use neem oil on the carrots to prevent carrot flies?
spongebobspongebob24 (1 year ago)
You can also grow onions/garlic beside the carrots to confuse the fly.
GrowVeg (2 years ago)
Neem oil could possibly be used as an insecticide. But if you are talking about preventing insects such as carrot flies, it's best to use other means such as row covers/horticultural fleece. For carrot fly, the easiest method is to erect a 60cm (2ft) high 'fence' of fleece all around your carrots. Make sure it's buried into the ground. This prevents the low-flying insects from reaching the plants and laying their eggs.
gudebro2000 (2 years ago)
Totally weird question: if I wanted to free seed some of these to make them available for pigs in pasture, would I still have to make sure they have space (for instance, planting seeds 2cm apart then plucking any that grow in between) or would they still be productive enough for pig rooting if I just scattered seeds a month or two before I put the pigs on the land
Antonio Dalit (1 year ago)
GrowVeg I
GrowVeg (2 years ago)
The cultivated space not only maximises yield, it ensures the roots reach the best possible size. So if they were further apart than the recommended spacing you would have wasted space, but if they were closer the roots would be likely to be smaller. So it is the optimum spacing for the best-sized roots.
gudebro2000 (2 years ago)
+GrowVeg thank you. From what I understand, for soy free/corn free pasture raising, grass is the most common. The reason I ask about spacing is because I have seen some people advocate broadcast seeding of turnips in pasture. I was just wondering if the cultivated space is just to maximize yield for the grower or if broadcasting wouldn't yield anything. Obviously I can't ask the pig farmer because obviously they would just advocate for what they are already doing
GrowVeg (2 years ago)
You could try 'broadcast' sowing the seeds and leaving them as they are, a bit closer. But generally the spacing is there for a reason - so the plants can grow to their full size and produce the biggest harvest. I wonder if there are more efficient ways to feed pigs however?
Paul Carter (2 years ago)
awesome videos. thank you for showing love towards our mother nature
Bem legal
Mohammed Amine (2 years ago)
Hello, i just discovered you channel and i love it, i have a question and i hope you can answer me, i live in Sahara in algeria the weather there is dry and hot and i was wondering if you can recommand any fruits or vegetables that i can grow here, thank you :)
GrowVeg (2 years ago)
Not familiar with the hot, dry climate, but I would imagine - given suitable watering - you could grow many heat-loving crops such as tomatoes, peppers, aubergines/egg plant. You could also try growing leafy vegetables with the help of shade cloth, which will shield plants from the strongest sunlight. Fruits - try citrus plants and heat-lovers such as melons.
aparna Mantravadi (2 years ago)
thanknuuuuso muchh
UR3ANFISH (2 years ago)
Hi, could you still grow these vegetables on a balcony?
GrowVeg (2 years ago)
+UR3ANFISH Yes, these would work well in pots on a sheltered balcony.
Tigerdeer (2 years ago)
Hi. Thanks for the vid. All these veg are very prone to being chewed on by slugs. What do you do?
Rusty Fox (1 year ago)
Slugs and snails love a beer. Put out some shallow bowls, bury deep enough to avoid them getting knocked over. Almost fill with beer. Stale beer is fine, they're not fussy! They'll come to the party, get drunk and drown. Best thing is it's completely safe for pets and children (hygiene aside, of course). A half litre of beer will provide a dozen or more watering holes for your slimy visitors. Just empty out the dead pests and top up as required. Here in the Philippines we have Giant African Snails - I've seen them as big as 6" long shells, although the biggest I've had in my garden was 4-1/2" long. We also have some pretty big slugs. They all love their beer!
PJ D (2 years ago)
Save your egg shells, nuke them in batches on high for a minute or so to kill bacteria, then cool them, and crush them up really fine in a mortar and pestle or food processor, and sprinkle around plants!
GrowVeg (2 years ago)
+Tigerdeer Good luck with next year. Slugs are a worldwide pain I'm afraid - they're equally as prolific in my garden!
Tigerdeer (2 years ago)
+GrowVeg Apologies for that. I get a lot of slugs here in our garden in Sydney, Australia. Have tried the chemical stuff but have never actually used beer due to being too squeamish. Might try persuading my husband to deal with it next summer. :) Thank you very much for the quick response. Just discovered you channel, being a complete novice I am hoping to have more success next year with some veg.
Tigerdeer (2 years ago)
Ah, just saw the end of the vid. :)
VAMP MEDIA (2 years ago)
Ah hello, I didn't see you there, I had no idea the camera was on. You caught me quite by surprise lol.
JETJOOBOY (2 years ago)
French Dwarf beans were awesome when we tried them, lovely food and really surprisingly prolific and strangely hardy.. The plants never looked super healthy at all but just kept on giving, even when autumn was well upon us and I thought they were dead (they had next ro know leaves) I kept finding clusters of yummy beans!
TOM GRAY (1 year ago)
JETJOOBOY im growing some now, and you're right they do look a bit ragged...lol but they're giving tons of beans!
tuneinat (1 year ago)
Nice video..in s florida..okra..beets w a touch of afternoon shade..sweet potato's & is a perrenial here..summer squash..sunflowers perrenial also..bell peppers & eggplant
JETJOOBOY (2 years ago)
Hey Grow Veg guy! Cool, compact videos! Love 'em! Nice digestable top tips! I have to ask though are you Ray Mears brother by any chance?
GrowVeg (2 years ago)
+JETJOOBOY Thanks for the kind compliments! Ray Mears is a bit of an inspiration - but no relation I'm afraid!
Gardener Earth Guy (2 years ago)
I garden in NW Florida, curious do turnips and parsnips do well in the UK? I was able to grow all winter and have been seeding in summer crops as I harvest the winter holdovers. I plant lots of sunflowers to bring wasps that tend to eat grasshoppers, and other pests. The wasps, toads, and lizards and BT & Neem are my pest control. I like your channel and envy the orderly English garden style! Mine is much different, I have videos up if you'd like to see. Grow food, not lawns!
GrowVeg (2 years ago)
+Gardener Earth Guy Love your natural approach to pest control! Turnips and parsnips grow very well in the UK and the rest of Europe. Keep on enjoying the channel - it's great to have you on board!
marcjtdc (2 years ago)
BROCCOLI RAAB!
Daniel Neubauer (2 years ago)
Marijuana.
My life as Comedy (2 years ago)
Nice
ClivernTas (2 years ago)
I am in Hobart Tasmania (42 degrees South) where it is now February and Summer is fast disappearing. Have just lifted a crop of beetroot and need to replace it....beetroot as a replacement is no good as it takes too long......Found your video very useful....keep up the good work
kolo (1 year ago)
grow cactuss they are reallly cheap on amazon
GrowVeg (2 years ago)
+ClivernTas I love Tassie - spent a very happy two months in Hobart as a student.
Jagannadharao Korada (2 years ago)
A good video. I am keen to know which vegetable I should try and proceed with the gardening work and suitable dates for the Boyds - MD locality
GrowVeg (2 years ago)
+Jagannadharao Korada Hi there. Any of the vegetables mentioned here would do well in Maryland. You could try sowing from mid-spring - so whenever the soil temperature is consistently above about 50 Farenheit.
Jason Shoraka (2 years ago)
The shiitake mushroom grows in just 7 days. You spray the shiitake mushroom with a water bottle
Oscar Gasalatan (2 years ago)
thank you for sharing yourlovely ideas.
Sherrie I live in the south so I feel your pain.. try adding fallen leaves to your bed with sand with your soil and mix well add the leaves every year and before you know it you'll have some great well fertilized soil for your vegetables that's what I did and now I'm a garden Diva lol
Michael Toso (2 years ago)
Radishes salad leaves(continuous harvest):lettuce, mustard, kale, rocket, arugula, cilantro dwarf or bush beans carrots spinach
Life Love and Low Carb (2 years ago)
I'm in California and Kale is by for the fastest growing veggie.
Sj Smith (2 years ago)
I'm in the low desert in USA. We may get a mild frost in the Winter, but typically I get my best harvests from Fall planted crops. I've been planting carrots, beets, leaf lettuce, parsley, cilantro, mizuna, chamomile, bunching onions (and soon I'll order short-day onions for planting), celery, kale, corn salad, chard (also a catch crop for bugs here). Soon, I should put in the oriental pea pods, turnips, and parsley (I find they're good companions... putting parsley on the north or east side to shelter it if we get a hot spell). The turnips will harvest in January, when we are tired of so many sweet things during holidays. I had great success last year with Tropic Giant cabbage, which I think was from Park Seed. It was neglected due to drought, so I didn't harvest it. However, the chickens munched on it even through the Summer. With proper care, I do believe it will be a star in my Winter garden this year. I also add in edible flowers of calendula and violas this time of year. I am just now harvesting cucumbers from a late planting of seeds on July 15th. The winner variety in my experiment was Mici Hybrid from Ferry Morse - Asia Collection. Happy Gardening to all.... and may you be blessed with an abundance harvest too!
GrowVeg (2 years ago)
+Sj Smith And wishing you an abundant harvest too - sounds like you have some great stuff growing!
Mugiraneza Bienvenu (2 years ago)
i like that
Thomas Cranor (2 years ago)
dude this channel is the bees knees. -Thomas from Oregon
DarknLovelyAnita W. (2 years ago)
Love your videos. Some many great ideas!🌱
DarknLovelyAnita W. (2 years ago)
Great idea. I'm in Oakland, California and growing snap peas, pole beans, carrots, spinach, collard greens and lettuce for my fall garden. They are growing at a rapid rate.🌾🌽🌱🌱
Sherrie Miranda (2 years ago)
My soil is mostly clay. For several years now, I have added compost, gypsum and a bit of topsoil, but it is still quite clayie. A couple years ago, I planted radishes and they were horrible. Dry, bitter and inedible. The lettuce I have planted never grew, though the arugula grew like weeds and even jumped over the two-story house and grew in the parkway. I am in San Diego where I should be getting two crops a year, but I can't even seem to get ONE descent crop of anything but arugula! Please advise!
niecers (1 year ago)
Sherrie Miranda clay is very alkaline.keep amending and try some acid mulch and add iron. add sand also. peat will also help. or do raised beds.
Life Love and Low Carb (2 years ago)
+Sherrie Miranda I have a similar situation and I'm in California too. I would suggest either creating your own raised beds above ground or container gardening. I've had great success with the containers and planters. My soil is not clay but it's sandy and filled with rocks, broken glass and other crap. So I get my garden soil from my local Home Depot and it works just fine. Good luck with this, I love gardening, it keeps me out of trouble. Lol
Matthew Groff (2 years ago)
+Sherrie Miranda Have you tried "Raised Beds"? Raised beds will allow you to grow all kinds of plants that you normally would not be able to grow because of the soil. You can make your own raised beds or buy them already made. The ones that are already made can be a little expensive, anywhere from $120 to upwards to $500 for a raised bed of 4 feet by 4 feet by 12 inches deep, 4 feet by 4 feet 24 inches deep, or 4 feet by 4 feet by 36 inches deep. But you can make and even buy them in all sizes and depths, from 2 foot wide by 4 foot long by 12 inches/1 foot deep, to ???? use your imagination. You can even use old fashioned metal wash tubs, or stock water tanks, or a wooden barrel, or even grow vegetables in pots and buckets. To grow in a raised bed or Containers, you will need garden soil or potting soil. or make/mix your own. Or you can use what some call the "Lasagna" Gardening method. There are plenty of good articles online that cover Lasagna Gardening, just look it up. Hope that helps you!
GreenThumbEngines (2 years ago)
very informational. I just sub'd !!
Reddylion (2 years ago)
THANKS .. anil Reddy
greenriceman (3 years ago)
Just about to move to Mongolia so very timely - the season is only 90 days so looking for ideas on quick vegetables. Thank you.
GrowVeg (3 years ago)
+greenriceman Good luck with your move and new garden!
86jway (3 years ago)
How do you make your rows so straight and even? I was hoping you were going to show us. You rake in the compost and what's the next step? It sure would be interesting to see what you do!
GrowVeg (3 years ago)
+86jway The easiest way is to have a roll of string around one wooden peg, with another wooden peg at the other end. Just unroll it and put the pegs in so the string is taught, then use a draw hoe, or other tool with a point, to pull along the string to make the furrow.
Andrina Escalante (3 years ago)
Very good video! Thank you. I would include cilantro as a speedy plant. 👍👋
GrowVeg (3 years ago)
+Andrina Escalante Yes, thanks. In warm areas cilantro can be a great speedy plant.
GrowVeg (3 years ago)
Quick-maturing Plants: 5 Fast Growing Vegetables to Try - As vegetables are harvested, gaps will inevitably appear in your garden. However, leaving bare soil exposes your garden to weeds and can make it more prone to erosion, plus it means your garden isn’t being as productive as it could be.....YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=13&v=jEir3tR0k90
Marvin Double (3 years ago)
Excellent advice and a nice presentation.  The idea of developing a warning system for garden pests is potentially very useful.
Scott Gillespie (3 years ago)
Another thing to do is plant the speedy vegetables near pumpkins or other vine crops in the spring. Once you harvest them the vines can take over the space. I only have 3 months of growing in southern Alberta (Canada) so I've found succession planting not very feasible.
Kelli Nigh (3 years ago)
Thanks, that overview was very helpful.
Tatiana Enders (3 years ago)
I also like to do a second crop of beets, there are some varieties that are ready in two months or less. :)
GrowVeg (3 years ago)
+Tatiana Podstavkova Yes, good point. Baby beets can be great to harvest and they're less likely to bolt (run to seed) if sown later.
Meticularius (3 years ago)
Thank you for your time and interest. I appreciate your videos. About pests, etc.: do you have information about the lower Midwest United States? I am planting vegetables. I planted Hollyhocks to replace some my mother-in-law had grown and which disappeared after several years. Some little bugger(s) eat holes in the leaves and insecticidal soap seems to do little to stop them. >
Marina Wilson (3 years ago)
I grow dwarf beans all over my garden in and around my flowers and wherever, there is a gap. The flowers are pretty and come in different colours and they attract beans which can be frozen or salted if a glut. Will try more carrots though as I love them fresh to eat whilst I'm gardening!
El Buitre De Madrid (3 years ago)
Why is my lattuce and arucola taking ages to grow? 4 weeks after sowing they are still couple inches :(
TheTrueabundance (3 years ago)
+El Buitre De Madrid Hi! from your name I assume you are in Madrid - Lettuce and arugula grow in Spain as winter vegetables. Try planting them in October or November...
El Buitre De Madrid (3 years ago)
Thanks for your prompt response. I have 3-4 hours of sun (quite hot) per day but recently it has been cool temperature for the rest of the day. So you suggest to put my pots in a non direct sunlight spot?
GrowVeg (3 years ago)
+El Buitre De Madrid Are conditions very hot in your area? Heat and not enough water could both be issues. If it's heat then you can use shade cloth or perhaps delay sowing a few more weeks.
photopics (3 years ago)
Squash will grow fast also. After my squash plants are done I replant and get more before cold weather kills them.

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