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How Women Can Reduce The Risk Of Breast Cancer
 
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From mammograms to genetic testing, Dr. Lisa Guerra with Breastlink Newport Beach shares ways to decrease breast cancer risks.
Просмотров: 337 CBS Los Angeles
Older Postmenopausal Women at Highest Risk for Breast Cancer Death - ABC News
 
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http://www.healthwellpdx.com
Просмотров: 156 HealthWellPDX
HRT breast cancer risk higher than first thought
 
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BBC News at Six 23 August 2016
Просмотров: 141 Incorrigible Forever
Breast cancer: signs, symptoms & risk factors
 
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Discover the signs, symptoms of breast cancer as well as its incidence and risk factors in this video with Dr Victoria Harmer, Macmillan Consultant Nurse (Imperial College Health Care NHS Trust, UK). #breastcancerawareness You can find more breast cancer content at: www.oncology-central.com/category/disease-area/breast/ To gain free access to the latest oncology research, news and interviews with key opinion leaders - make sure to create your free Oncology Central account: www.oncology-central.com
Просмотров: 4953 Oncology Central
Does Removing the Ovaries Reduce Breast Cancer Risk?
 
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Gynecologic Oncologist Dr. Mike Janicek explains how and by how much removing the ovaries can reduce a woman's risk of developing breast cancer. Women often avoid removing the ovaries because they don't want to deal with early menopause. Dr. Janicek explains how this can be avoided. Watch this video to learn more about risk reduction surgery. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/wh... Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk. If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Просмотров: 4922 Breast Cancer Answers®
Symptoms Of Brest Cancer Everyone Should Know | Common Triggers of Breast Cancer
 
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Symptoms Of Brest Cancer Everyone Should Know | The Common Triggers of Breast Cancer | Symptoms Of Brest Cancer Everyone Should Know | The Common Triggers of Breast Cancer Breast cancer is the most common invasive cancer in females worldwide. 18.2% of all deaths from cancer worldwide including both males and females are from breast cancer. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide aThe Common Triggers of Breast Cancer. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide and the second-most-common cause of death from cancer. Although the chances of curing breast cancer have risen recently, efforts to prevent occurrence in the first place have been less successful. Around one in eight women in Australia are expected to be diagnosed before the age of 85. Despite the disease being common, different people have very different chances of being diagnosed with breast cancer. Working out this chance for each person guides who will benefit most from ways to reduce risk. These can involve changes in diet and exercise, preventive medications, or even surgery in high-risk cases. We’re aware of many things about a person’s lifestyle or genes that increase the chances of getting breast cancer, but we don’t always understand how these might cause the disease. here are The Common Triggers of Breast Cancer. Hormones. Oestrogen, the predominant female hormone mainly produced by the ovaries, plays a well-known role in breast cancer development and protection. A range of factors that are known to affect a woman’s breast cancer risk (like how many children she has) also affect how much oestrogen she is exposed to throughout life. Oestrogen causes breast development in puberty and during pregnancy helps the breasts develop for breastfeeding. Unfortunately, increased oestrogen over a long time can also cause damage to normal breast cell DNA and cause these damaged cells to multiply, which can start a cancer. Factors that increase lifetime oestrogen exposure and, with that, breast cancer risk, include having no or few children and starting your family at an older age. Going through puberty earlier or menopause later, which both increase a woman’s total number of menstrual cycles, is also linked to higher risk. Women who have more children earlier and breastfeed are at lower risk of breast cancer. Both cause an increase of oestrogen around the pregnancy but then lower levels than normal for many years after. Dairy, meat and vegetables. There is a widespread concern that elements of the modern diet add to breast cancer risk. But the belief that preservatives and pesticides are major contributors has never been confirmed. Similarly, no risk increase has been found for people consuming dairy products. Eating meat appears to cause little or no risk. But the fifth of the population eating the highest levels of red or processed meats. Lifestyle, obesity and stress. Alcohol increases lifetime breast cancer risk by around a tenth per drink per day for the period during which drinking occurs. Active smoking, but not passive smoking, also increases risk by about a fifth – especially in younger women. Caffeine may be mildly protective and chocolate appears safe in moderation. This is provided consumption does not lead to substantial weight gain, as obesity has repeatedly been shown to increase breast cancer occurrence by about a fifth, especially in post-menopausal women. This may be because fatty tissues produce oestrogen. Also, obese women have higher insulin levels, another hormone that can lead to breast cancer. Those developing full diabetes in later life, when insulin levels are usually very high. Genetic factors. It is well known women who inherit faults in particular genes which repair damaged DNA, particularly the BRCA 1 and 2 genes, have a high risk of both breast and ovarian cancer – up to an 80% lifelong risk for breast cancer and 40% for ovarian cancer. Collections of these genetic markers can be tested together in a person’s blood to better predict their breast cancer risk. Given the strength of mammographic density as a risk factor and its prevalence in the population, it is likely to influence breast cancer in a large number of women. Good consumption of vegetables, limiting alcohol, avoiding being substantially overweight, especially after menopause, and getting regular moderate exercise will lower risk. Looking at mammographic density and considering genetic tests, especially in women with a family history, may be valuable and should be discussed with the family doctor. Preventive medication or surgery can be used for those at high risk, usually in consultation with a breast cancer specialist. PLEASE DO SUBSCRIBE TO MY CHANNEL- its free https://bit.ly/2lzAbZ0 Be Friend on FaceBook. https://www.facebook.com/NaturalCuresRemedies1 Twitter. https://twitter.com/CuresRemedies #naturalcuresremedies #breastcancer
Просмотров: 1604 Natural Cures Remedies
Breast Cancer Hormone Therapy: What Is It And Who Needs It?
 
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In this video, Dr. Jay K. Harness discusses hormone therapy, or anti-hormone therapy as he calls it, for premenopausal and post-menopausal breast cancer patients. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk.  If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Просмотров: 14858 Breast Cancer Answers®
Hormonal Therapy for Breast Cancer: We Teach You
 
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We teach you about hormonal therapy for breast cancer. Drugs such as tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors are key treatment options for most breast cancers. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ ________________________________ Questions for your Medical Oncologist: 1. What type of hormonal therapy do you recommend? 2. Will I also benefit from chemotherapy? 3. What are the side effects of hormonal therapy? 4. Will I need 5 or 10 years of these medications? 5. Would the genomic assay Oncotype DX be helpful? 6. What is Hormonal Therapy? Anti-estrogen (estrogen-blocking) medications, prescribed as pills, are incredibly effective at treating certain types of breast cancer. Hormonal therapy is given to about 70 to 80% of women with breast cancer. Chemotherapy, on the other hand, is a more intense cancer treatment that is generally administered intravenously. Most patients will not need chemotherapy. Many women that do need chemotherapy will also benefit from hormonal therapy. These treatment decisions are complex ones with your medical oncologist. You will make better choices when you are well informed before meeting with your medical oncologist. Do my “Receptors” suggest Hormonal Therapy? When the estrogen circulating in your blood stream interacts with a breast cancer that has “Estrogen Receptors” (ER) present on its surface, it tends to flip the ER switch to the “on” or “grow” position for ER Positive tumors. The same can be said to a lesser extent for the “Progesterone Receptor,” if your cancer is found to also be PR positive. Patients with ER+ breast cancers almost always benefit from the anti-estrogen effects of hormonal therapy. These medications can make cancer cells die, or slow down their growth. If a few cancer cells have already spread to other parts of the body, these medications are incredibly effective at preventing these cells from growing and threatening your life in the future. In other words, those who take hormonal therapy for ER+ tumors have a more successful chance at long-term survival when compared to those who do not. About 80% of all breast cancers are ER+. Even if your medical oncologist recommends chemotherapy for you, if your tumor is ER+ you will also benefit from up to 10 years of hormonal therapy after chemotherapy. Hormonal therapy is never given during chemotherapy nor during radiation therapy. What is “Tamoxifen?” Tamoxifen is an anti-estrogen medication (pills) that has been used with great success with ER+ cancers for three decades. It is now the primary hormonal therapy for younger, pre-menopausal women. It is also the primary drug for men with breast cancer. It is used for some post-menopausal women. What are “Aromatase Inhibitors?” Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are a class of anti-estrogen medications (pills) that have proven to be slightly more effective than Tamoxifen for post-menopausal women. It is not recommended for younger, pre-menopausal women, except in certain circumstances. The three most common versions are Anastrozole (Arimidex), Letrozole (Femara), and Exemestane (Aromasin). What are the side effects of Hormonal Therapy? Side effects vary greatly from one person to the next for both types of hormonal medications. Some have no symptoms at all. Most have very tolerable side effects. Some patients will need to change hormonal therapy medications to find the best balance of cancer benefit versus side effects. Several side effects that are rather common for both tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors are hot flashes, night sweats, joint pain, and vaginal dryness. Below, we list some of the other specific side effects for both drugs. Tamoxifen Side Effects: Increased risk of uterine (endometrial) cancer Increased risk of developing blood clots Slows normal bone loss in most women (a “good” side effect) Cannot be taken during pregnancy because of risk of birth defects or fetal death Can temporarily induce menopause in pre-menopausal women. Aromatase Inhibitor Side Effects: Can worsen bone loss (osteoporosis) in women Muscle and joint aches and pains Would an “Oncotype DX” assay help me? Patients who have a small, estrogen receptor positive, HER2 receptor negative tumor, and no evidence of cancer in their lymph nodes may benefit from an Oncotype DX genomic assay. This cutting-edge test looks deeper into your cancer cells to better identify people who may also benefit from chemotherapy with ER+ breast cancers. The decision to undergo chemotherapy, in addition to hormonal therapy, is a complicated one. Your medical oncologist uses many factors to help decide if you will benefit from chemotherapy. An Oncotype DX analysis of a portion of your breast cancer tissue can be instrumental in this decision.
Просмотров: 4073 Breast Cancer School for Patients
Breast Cancer Recurrence: Risk, Therapy and Surveillance
 
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The risk of recurrence for women after early stage breast cancer treatment. Plus, the protective benefits of endocrine and HER-2 therapies; what tests and imaging should be done for surveillance; and how to manage the anxiety of possible recurrence. From Antonio Wolff, M.D., medical oncologist at the Johns Hopkins Sydney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center in Baltimore, MD.
Просмотров: 4707 Johns Hopkins Medicine
Researchers: Women Can Lower Risk Of Breast Cancer With Weight Loss
 
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A study in the journal, Cancer, analyzes information on more than 60,000 women and finds those who lost weight after menopause were less likely to develop invasive breast cancer than women who maintained or gained weight.
Просмотров: 60 CBS Denver
What causes and Symptoms of breast cancer
 
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Today in the Series of breast cancer i am going to tell you about you What causes and Symptoms of breast cancer? so, before watch our video take a moment to subscribe our channel and click on the bell button. then you will be first to know we will post new video. Experts still aren't fully sure what triggers the gene mutations that cause breast cancer, but they do know there are several risk factors that up your odds of contracting this disease. “When we think about breast cancer, we try to break it down into things you can and can’t change,” says Dr. Kruse. “There are risk factors you’re born with and then there are others that you can actually do something about.” In many cases, those lifestyle-related risk factors are not all that difficult to change. Remember: Not all women who have a risk factor or even multiple risk factors will develop breast cancer. And some women who have no known risk factors still end up being diagnosed. Lifestyle-related breast cancer risk factors you can control! Drinking alcohol! Being overweight or obese! Not exercising! Having kids later in life! Not breastfeeding! Taking birth control! Using hormone therapy after menopause! (Breast cancer risk factors you cannot change) Being a woman! Getting older! Having certain inherited genes! Having a family history of breast cancer! Having breast cancer in the past! Your race and ethnicity! Having dense breast tissue! Getting your period early! Going through menopause after 55! Having radiation to your chest as a kid! Exposure to DES (a synthetic form of estrogen)! What are the symptoms of breast cancer? The most common sign of breast cancer is a painless, hard lump or mass with irregular edges. But a lump isn’t the only sign of breast cancer. Sometimes breast cancer can spread to the lymph nodes under the arm or around the collar bone and cause a lump or swelling there. “If you notice any fullness or lumps under the arm that don't come and go, that’s a concerning sign and you should get checked by a healthcare provider,” says Dr. Kruse. In general, she notes that a lot of the symptoms of breast cancer, even lumps or pain, are hard to distinguish on your own so if you notice any change in your breasts, see your doctor. Thanks For Watching Our Video. For More Video about Breast Cancer Awareness Don't Forget To Subscribe out Youtube Channel And Click on bell button. Facebook: https://goo.gl/yRvBC5 Twitter: https://goo.gl/XPSPze #Breast_Cancer #Causes #Symptoms
Просмотров: 135 Herbs cures
How to Block Breast Cancer's Estrogen-Producing Enzymes
 
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What happens to hormone levels in women (and men) randomized to drink soymilk? Subscribe to Dr. Greger’s free nutrition newsletter at http://www.nutritionfacts.org/subscribe and get a free excerpt from his latest NYT Bestseller HOW NOT TO DIE. (All proceeds Dr. Greger receives from the sales of his books, DVDs, and speaking engagements go to support the 501c3 nonprofit that runs NutritionFacts.org.) Wait, soy protects against breast cancer? Yes, in study after study after study. Even in women at high risk? See BRCA Breast Cancer Genes and Soy (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/brca-breast-cancer-genes-and-soy/). Even if you already have breast cancer? See Is Soy Healthy for Breast Cancer Survivors? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Is-Soy-Healthy-for-Breast-Cancer-Survivors). Even GMO soy? See GMO Soy and Breast Cancer (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/gmo-soy-and-breast-cancer/). OK, then Who Shouldn’t Eat Soy? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/who-shouldnt-eat-soy). Watch that video too! :) What else can we do to decrease breast cancer risk? See: • Broccoli vs. Breast Cancer Stem Cells (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/broccoli-versus-breast-cancer-stem-cells/) • Flaxseeds & Breast Cancer Prevention (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/flaxseeds-breast-cancer-prevention/) • Breast Cancer vs. Mushrooms (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-cancer-vs-mushrooms/) • Preventing Breast Cancer by Any Greens Necessary (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/preventing-breast-cancer-by-any-greens-necessary/) • Tree Nuts or Peanuts for Breast Cancer Prevention? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/tree-nuts-or-peanuts-for-breast-cancer-prevention/) • Estrogenic Cooked Meat Carcinogens (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/estrogenic-cooked-meat-carcinogens/) • Fiber vs. Breast Cancer (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/fiber-vs-breast-cancer/) • Breast Cancer and Alcohol: How Much Is Safe? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-cancer-and-alcohol-what-much-is-safe/) • Breast Cancer Risk: Red Wine v. White Wine (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-cancer-risk-red-wine-vs-white-wine/) • Cholesterol Feeds Breast Cancer Cells (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Cholesterol-Feeds-Breast-Cancer-Cells) • Which Dietary Factors Affect Breast Cancer Most? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Which-Dietary-Factors-Affect-Breast-Cancer-Most) • Industry Response to Bovine Leukemia Virus in Breast Cancer (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/industry-response-to-bovine-leukemia-virus-in-breast-cancer) • The Role of Bovine Leukemia in Breast Cancer (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-role-of-bovine-leukemia-virus-in-breast-cancer) Have a question about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-to-block-breast-cancers-estrogen-producing-enzymes and someone on the NutritionFacts.org team will try to answer it. Want to get a list of links to all the scientific sources used in this video? Click on Sources Cited at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-to-block-breast-cancers-estrogen-producing-enzymes. You’ll also find a transcript of the video, my blog and speaking tour schedule, and an easy way to search (by translated language even) through our videos spanning more than 2,000 health topics. If you’d rather watch these videos on YouTube, subscribe to my YouTube Channel here: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=nutritionfactsorg Thanks for watching. I hope you’ll join in the evidence-based nutrition revolution! -Michael Greger, MD FACLM http://www.NutritionFacts.org • Subscribe: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/subscribe • Donate: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/donate • HOW NOT TO DIE: http://nutritionfacts.org/book • Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NutritionFacts.org • Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nutrition_facts • Instagram: http://instagram.com/nutrition_facts_org/ • Google+: https://plus.google.com/+NutritionfactsOrgMD • Podcast: http://nutritionfacts.org/audio/
Просмотров: 52334 NutritionFacts.org
Post-menopause hormones linked to elevated risk of death from breast cancer
 
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The Washington Post is reporting that a new federal study found that women who take a popular hormone drug after menopause can increase their chances of not only contracting breast cancer, but dying from the disease. The study followed more than 12,000 women for 11 years and found that breast cancer was more common among hormone-users. This new finding by the Women's Health Initiative comes after differing medical opinions on the use of hormones. For years, doctors have recommended taking hormones to alleviate symptoms of menopause and to slow aging. However, eight years ago, another Women's Health Initiative study revealed that the risk of hormones, which included heart disease and breast cancer, outweighed its benefits. Since the publishing of this previous study, doctors have diverged on their recommendations, with some recommending very low doses for short periods of time while others have recommended use for up to 5 years. The new analysis suggests that women who took the combination of estrogen and progestin - sold as Prempro - were more likely to develop larger tumors that were more likely to spread to lymph nodes with an increased risk of death.
Просмотров: 570 TradeTheTrend
Your Cancer Risk: Estrogen Replacement After a Hysterectomy
 
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*Your Cancer Risk: Estrogen Replacement After a Hysterectomy* This Friday on May 15th at 9 pm PT, we will be talking with Dr. Philip Sarrel about estrogen replacement after a hysterectomy. A new study shows that using estrogen alone may not influence breast cancer risk in the same way as the combined therapy of estrogen and synthetic progesterone. Estrogen use in women with hysterectomy is associated with a reduced risk for breast cancer and that if you stop estrogen after having hysterectomy that benefit of breast cancer reduction is lost over time. Hormone replacement therapy, or HRT, is used to relieve menopausal symptoms. A woman on hormone therapy usually takes both estrogen and synthetic progesterone, known as progestin. Women who have had a hysterectomy can take estrogen alone. Join Medical Director Dr. Jay Harness and guest Dr. Philip Sarrel as they discuss estrogen replacement after a hysterectomy this Friday, May 15th at 9 am PT/12 pm ET. If you are a mobile user, join us using this link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wKg67GSX97s #Estrogen #Hysterectomy #BreastCancer
Просмотров: 3904 Breast Cancer Answers®
Breast Cancer Environmental Risk Factors
 
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Dr. Harness discusses environmental factors that may increase breast cancer risk, such as cigarette smoke, x-rays, plastics and more. He encourages all women to live a heart-healthy lifestyle in order to overcome toxins in the environment. Learn more in this video. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk.  If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Просмотров: 8256 Breast Cancer Answers®
Honoring A Young Woman’s Bravery After Fatal Breast Cancer Diagnosis | Megyn Kelly TODAY
 
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Last fall, Megyn Kelly TODAY profiled Larissa Podermanksi, who had been diagnosed with fatal and incurable metastatic breast cancer. Now Larissa has died at the age of 32, and we share a look back at her life. » Subscribe to TODAY: http://on.today.com/SubscribeToTODAY » Watch the latest from TODAY: http://bit.ly/LatestTODAY About: TODAY brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on money, health and parenting. We wake up every morning to give you and your family all you need to start your day. If it matters to you, it matters to us. We are in the people business. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive TODAY archival footage & our original web series. Connect with TODAY Online! Visit TODAY's Website: http://on.today.com/ReadTODAY Find TODAY on Facebook: http://on.today.com/LikeTODAY Follow TODAY on Twitter: http://on.today.com/FollowTODAY Follow TODAY on Google+: http://on.today.com/PlusTODAY Follow TODAY on Instagram: http://on.today.com/InstaTODAY Follow TODAY on Pinterest: http://on.today.com/PinTODAY Honoring A Young Woman’s Bravery After Fatal Breast Cancer Diagnosis | Megyn Kelly TODAY
Просмотров: 1693 TODAY
Breast cancer for transgender women
 
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In line of Pink October, My Ladyboy Date would like to take part of letting you know about the risk of getting breast cancer for transgender women. Got a question, want an answer? Just ask by posting your question into the comments! My Ladyboy Date is the first decent dating website for transgender women and men who like transgender women. It's free to sign up and review your matches, browse the profiles and watch the photo. Sign up there: http://myladyboydate.com/signup
Просмотров: 5842 My Ladyboy Date
Fertility After Breast Cancer
 
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Reproductive Endocrinologist Dr. Lisa Kolp discusses childbearing after cancer, the risk of infertility, reproductive technologies, associated costs and insurance coverage for specific procedures, and how to work with all of your medical providers to ensure family planning goals are addressed. For more information http://bit.ly/JHBreastCaSurvivorship
Просмотров: 533 Johns Hopkins Medicine
Women with breast cancer gene mutation more likely to survive cancer after double mastectomy
 
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Read the full research: http://www.bmj.com/cgi/doi/10.1136/bmj.g226 Results show that over 20 more lives could be saved per 100 women, but further research is needed to confirm findings Women who carry a mutation on the BRCA breast cancer gene - and are diagnosed with early stage breast cancer - are significantly less likely to die if they undergo a double mastectomy than those who have only one breast removed, suggests a paper published on bmj.com today. The authors say double mastectomy should be discussed as an option for young women with a BRCA mutation and early onset breast cancer. However, given the small number of women in this group, further research is required to confirm the findings. Women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation face a lifetime risk of breast cancer of 60 -- 70% and once diagnosed with breast cancer face a high risk of second primary breast cancer. There is little information on the long-term survival experience of women with either of these genes who are treated for breast cancer. In North America, one half of women with a BRCA mutation will undergo a double breast removal to prevent a second breast cancer, but it has not yet been shown that this reduces the risk of death. Researchers from the US and Canada set out to review the twenty year survival experience of 390 women (from 290 different families) with early-stage breast cancer, diagnosed from 1975 to 2009. The women were either known to be carriers or were likely to be carriers of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene and were treated with single or double mastectomy. Of these 390 patients, 44 were initially treated with bilateral (double) mastectomy and 346 were initially treated with unilateral (single) mastectomy. Of those that were treated with unilateral mastectomy, 137 went on to have the other breast removed at a later date (contralateral mastectomy). The average time from diagnosis to contralateral mastectomy was two years. Over the 20 year follow-up period, 79 women died of breast cancer (18 in the bilateral mastectomy group and 61 in the unilateral mastectomy group). Results showed that having both breasts removed was associated with a significant (48%) reduction in breast cancer death compared with having only one breast removed over a 20 year period. Based on these results, the researchers predict that of 100 women treated with double mastectomy, 87 will be alive at 20 years compared with 66 of 100 women treated with single mastectomy. The authors say bilateral mastectomy should be discussed as an option for young women with a BRCA mutation and early onset breast cancer. However, given the small number of women in this group, further research is required to confirm the findings. The significant mortality benefit associated with a double breast removal was most apparent in the second decade of follow-up after initial breast cancer diagnosis. The majority of deaths during this time period (55%) occurred among women who experienced a second breast cancer. The researchers conclude that it is "reasonable to propose bilateral mastectomy as the initial treatment option for a woman with early-stage breast cancer who carries a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation". They suggest further discussion with women who have previously had one breast removed. They also suggest that women with newly-diagnosed breast cancer might benefit from knowing they carry a BRCA mutation.
Просмотров: 1315 The BMJ
Study finds obese, post-menopausal women at elevated risk for breast cancer
 
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A new domestic study of over 1 million local women screened for breast cancer has revealed that obese post-menopausal women are at an elevated risk of contracting the disease. The study indicated that high levels of body fat correlated with an increase in estrogen, which was linked to the growth of breast cancer cells.A ten-year study by a team of researchers from NTU and Taipei Medical University Hospital followed 1.39 million Taiwanese women who had undergone screenings for breast cancer. They found that overweight women who stopped menstruating are at a much higher risk for contracting breast cancer.Tu Shih-hsin Taipei Medical Univ. Cancer Research CenterAs body fat levels increase, the metabolism of those cells generates an excess of estrogen, which then stimulates an increase in the production of cells in the mammary gland. So elevated estrogen levels can cause growth in cancer cells.Body Mass Index, or BMI, is a measure of body fat based upon a person’s height and weight. The normal BMI of a healthy individual can range from 18.5 to 23.9, but the study found that those with a BMI greater than 35 are up to 65 percent more likely to contract breast cancer. The authors of the study which was published in the International Journal of Obesity advised post-menopausal women to prevent against breast cancer by watching their weight.Tu Shih-hsin Taipei Medical Univ. Cancer Research CenterDon’t engage in long-term use of female hormones which aren’t absolutely necessary, and maintain a habit of regular exercise in order to avoid excess body weight.It’s not just post-menopausal women who are affected as the study also found older women who were overweight from a young age contract breast cancer at an elevated rate. Researchers reminded women to stay healthy by exercising and watching what they eat beginning at a young age.
Просмотров: 161 Formosa EnglishNews
Breast Cancer Risk with Oral Contraceptives
 
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A Danish study suggests that oral contraceptive use may be linked to a 20% increased risk of breast cancer. Learn from the Doctors Vaughan how a 20% increase in risk means 6 out of 7700 women instead of 5 out of 7700 are thought to get breast cancer because of oral contraceptive use. This video originally aired live. Dr. Vaughan responds to comments made by viewers using the chat function at the time of the recording of the video. You can be notified of future live videos as they occur by activating notifications on the Auburn Medical Group YouTube page by clicking on the bell icon. https://www.youtube.com/auburnmedicalgroup Thank you to our patrons on Patreon at the $5 level and higher: BooBoo Kitty Lindsay Graff Petra Rosenberg LeeAnn Vaughan John P. Baugh Lisa Canfield Sharon Calvert Linda D. Watson Don Tom Lehrer Pamela Schramke Rae McDonald Learn how to contribute and get rewards through Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/doctorvaughan New videos are posted on Friday, 4 PM, Pacific Time. This video is not intended to diagnose or treat any condition. It is for educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for evaluation by your own doctor. Be sure to subscribe to the Auburn Medical Group YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/c/auburnmedicalgroup?sub_confirmation=1 You can follow Dr. Mark Vaughan on Twitter and Instagram: @doctorvaughan. You can find the Auburn Medical Group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Auburn-Medical-Group-Inc-102055798325/?fref=ts Please comment and ask questions. Share with your friends who would be interested in seeing this video. To help with correcting transcriptions/captions in any language go to: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?tab=2&c=UCOShHskqTZNneTshYWV14wQ Go to http://www.auburnmedicalgroup.com to learn about primary medical care in Auburn, California. Mailing address: Auburn Medical Group YouTube Channel 3280 Professional Drive Auburn, CA 95602 All patients on our videos give written consent to post videos on YouTube of their office visit and for discussion of their medical condition voluntarily and without coercion.
Просмотров: 1070 Auburn Medical Group
Breast Pain - This Breast Cancer Symptoms and Causes of the Tender Breasts Women Disease
 
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Breast pain is breast cancer symptoms. It has tender breasts and cause. It is able to arise for a number of reasons. Commonly, #BreastPain isn't a signal of breast most cancers. Even though many ladies with an ache in a single or both breasts can be involved that it's far breast most cancers. Know detail subscribe this channel: https://goo.gl/gQL0cj Many ladies worry that breast pain may be a signal of a critical scenario which includes breast most cancers, however, cache thru itself is rarely a signal of maximum cancers. Now we will discuss breast pain. Remember; don’t forget to subscribe this channel to get a future update. Causes of Breast Pain: There are a number of innocent causes for breast pain and tenderness that could greater often than no longer be associated with changes in hormone tiers. • Puberty in girls and occasionally for boys, too. • Menstruation and premenstrual syndrome. • Being pregnant - greater regularly in the course of the first trimester. • Days following childbirth as milk are to be had breastfeeding mastitis, which is due to a milk duct that isn't always properly draining and becomes infected, want to be dealt with. • Menopause. Some girls have lumpy breast tissue called fibrocystic breasts, which may be greater painful sooner or later of sure instances of the month. Fibrocystic breasts are not always related to maximum cancers, and the lumps are fluid-filled cysts in the desire to a mass of cells. Fibrocystic breast adjustments also are a commonplace purpose of breast pain. Fibrocystic breast tissue contains lumps that have a tendency to be tendered definitely earlier than your menstrual period. Source: 1. http://www.nationalbreastcancer.org/breast-pain 2. http://newswebbd.com/breast-cancer-causes-symptoms-treatment/ Watch More: 1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NmUaZtojA5M 2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMvkRUjhlO8 #################################### This Youtube channel associated with a website. You can visit this website and can know more detail about your asking topic. Website: http://newswebbd.com ************************************ There is the all social profile link of this Youtube channel. You can visit and stay with us. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/newswebbd/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/newswebbd24 Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+MotasimBillah Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/newswebbd/ Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/user/NewsWebBD
Просмотров: 67082 Sumon Info Point
How To Reduce Risk Of Pain After Breast Cancer Surgery
 
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Dr. Harness discusses a study from the Dec. 2012 issue of the journal "Pain." The study followed 400 women who underwent breast cancer surgery and doctors recorded their pain level for 6 months after. Watch this video to find out more about the study and what you can do to reduce your risk of pain after breast cancer surgery. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk. If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Просмотров: 7366 Breast Cancer Answers®
14 Breast Cancer Risk Factors You Should Discuss With Your Doctor
 
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If you've ever paid a visit to a gynecologist, chances are you've felt up one of those fake breasts that contains a lump somewhere within. And if you've ever felt up one of those fake breasts, you wouldn't be alone if you've had trouble finding the lump. If your mom, sister or daughter has or has hadbreast cancer, your risk of a similar diagnosis doubles. If two of any of those relatives have breast cancer, the chance you'll be diagnosed increases by five. TheSusan B. Komen Breast Cancer Foundationsays it quite plainly: "Age is an established risk for breast cancer." Women under 40 are less likely to get it than women over 70. Breast cancer in womenreceives much more attention than men, but that doesn't mean it can't happen. One percent of all breast cancers in the United States occur in men, according toKomen, with the chance of it happening 1 in 1,000 (compared with 1 in 8 for women). Women with dense breasts are six times more likely to develop breast cancer, according toBreastCancer.org. And breast density is often inherited, which means if your mom's breasts were dense, chances are yours are, too.Mammogramsare one way to measure the thickness of breast tissue, although your doctor may determine that additional screenings, such as MRIs or ultrasounds, could also be necessary. If you got your first period before age 12, you'll have a higher risk of breast cancer later on. Hand-in-hand with menstruating is developing breasts, so if they're forming earlier,"they're ready to interact with hormonesinside and outside your body, as well as with chemicals in products that are hormone disruptors. Oral contraceptives(otherwise known as the pill) contain synthetic forms of estrogen and progesterone, which, according toMD Anderson, changes a woman's hormone levels—and that can trigger breast cancer. The good news is the increased risk is only slight, and temporary, and it goes back to normal five years after going off the pill. TheAmerican Institute for Cancer Researchdoes not mince words: "Drinking just one glass of wine or other alcoholic drink a day increases breast cancer risk." A study released in spring 2017 that had data on 12 million women found "strong evidence" that a drink each day upped the increase of pre-menopausal breast cancer by 5 percent and post-menopausal breast cancer by 9 percent. Women who give birth and breastfeed have a lower risk of breast cancer than women who are childless.Everyday Healthsays that's because pregnancy and lactation interrupt ovulation, and "this alteration in the hormonal environment reduces breast-cancer risk somewhat." TheKomenorganization says women who become biological moms younger than 35 "tend to get a protective benefit from pregnancy" compared with women who give birth when they're older. Breast cells grow at a higher rate during pregnancy, and if there's any "genetic damage in the breast cells, it is copied as the cells grow"—and those cells can lead to breast cancer because genetic damage increases with age. TheNational Institutes of Healthsays obesity in post-menopausal women has been "positively associated with risk" of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers, making them 30 percent to 60 percent more likely to develop the disease than if they were slimmer. Age 50 is when many women's ovaries cease to release eggs. For women who start menopause later, though, the increased exposure to higher levels of hormones like estrogen for longer periods of time gives them a higher chance of developing breast and uterine cancers, according toCancer.net. Time magazinefound that more than 100 studies show "the most active women tend to have a 25 percent lower chance of developing" breast cancer than "the least active women." Lower body fat, which can be achieved in part through exercise, is critical for preventing breast cancer, since fatty tissue "is the primary source of hormones" that can be a major factor in developing the disease. Diethylstilbestrol, or DES, is a synthetic form of estrogen that some women took during pregnancy between 1940 and 1971 in order to prevent miscarriage and premature labor, according to theNational Cancer Institute. Ultimately, though, DES was found to be ineffective, so doctors stopped using it. Researchers have found that induced abortions have "no overall effect on the risk of breast cancer." This is per the largest study on the topic that came out of Denmark in the 1990s, which theAmerican Cancer Societycalled "very complete."
Просмотров: 6 Americono
Chemo #4| Just Be Brave| Young Black Woman with Breast Cancer
 
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This video is about all the random things that happend during and after chemo #4. :)
Просмотров: 1062 Dionne Jane
Hormones and Breast Cancer
 
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Dr. Stephanie Faubion discusses hormone use for women at risk for breast cancer
Просмотров: 618 MenopauseSociety
DCIS Breast Cancer: Learn What You Need To Know
 
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We teach you about DCIS and how it is treated. This pre-cancerous problem is also a risk factor for developing invasive cancer and is linked to the BRCA genetic mutation. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ __________________________________ Questions for your Breast Surgeon and Medical Oncologist: 1. Is DCIS a cancer or a pre-cancerous growth? 2. What exactly is the threat to my health from DCIS? 3. Are both surgery and radiation always needed for DCIS? 4. May I have a copy of my pathology reports? 5. Do I qualify for genetic testing if I have DCIS? 6. Will DCIS turn into an invasive cancer if not treated? Ductal Carcinoma In-Situ (DCIS) refers to breast cells that are growing abnormally in an area of the breast, but have not yet evolved to the point where they are considered “invasive breast cancer” and can spread beyond the breast to other parts of the body. Even the medical field is unsure whether to call it “non-invasive” breast cancer or a “pre-cancerous” problem. By definition, DCIS is considered a Stage O breast cancer. Important facts if you have DCIS: *If left untreated, it can evolve into an invasive breast cancer *You have a slightly higher lifetime risk of forming a new cancer in either breast in the future *You may now qualify for BRCA genetic testing. How is DCIS different from invasive cancer? Invasive Breast Cancer can threaten your life because it mau have the capacity to spread (metastasize) to other organs of the body. DCIS does not yet have this ability to spread, but it might if it evolves into an invasive breast cancer in the future. So we treat DCIS very seriously in order to lessen the risk of it developing into an invasive, life-threatening problem. Learn more about “Invasive Breast Cancer“ with our video lesson (here). What is the chance I will die of my DCIS? The risk is very low. The most comprehensive study (here) on the subject in 2015 showed that the risk of dying from any type of breast cancer 20 years after having your DCIS treated with a lumpectomy and radiation is about 1%. One take home message from this study is that you have plenty of time to make decisions with your breast specialists about how to best treat your DCIS. Lumpectomy or Mastectomy for DCIS? Removal of the area of DCIS with surgery is usually the first treatment. A lumpectomy removes the area with a surrounding margin of normal tissue. It is a great surgery if the area of DCIS is small. Radiation is generally recommended after surgery to further lessen the risk of the DCIS or an invasive cancer growing back in that area of the lumpectomy. Some women who are older or have a lower-risk type of DCIS sometimes can avoid radiation after a lumpectomy. A mastectomy is generally recommended only if DCIS involves a large area of the breast and thus would not be a good candidate for a lumpectomy and radiation. A mastectomy for DCIS does not make you live longer, but it does reduce the chance of cancer growing back in that breast. Radiation is generally not needed after a mastectomy for DCIS. Take our video lesson on “Lumpectomy or Mastectomy“ (here) to learn more. You and your breast surgeon must work closely together to decide what surgery is best for your unique cancer situation. Should I take “anti-estrogen” medicines for DCIS? When someone is diagnosed with DCIS, the pathologists will run special studies on the tumor cells to determine if Estrogen receptors and Progesterone receptors are present. If your DCIS is “Estrogen receptor positive,” taking anti-estrogen medications for 5 years can lessen the chance of developing a new breast cancer (either DCIS or invasive cancer) over the next 5 to 10 years if you had a lumpectomy. Taking “tamoxifen” or an “aromatase inhibitor” medication for this purpose is called “chemoprevention.” If a woman has bilateral mastectomies there is no need for chemoprevention because the breast tissue has been removed. Women with DCIS are felt to have an increased risk for developing new cancers in both breasts in the future. Taking these medications can reduce the risk of new breast cancers in these higher risk women, but these drugs are not without potential side effects and risks. That is why a “risk vs benefit” discussion with a medical oncologist is important. You may qualify for genetic testing if you have DCIS. DCIS is now known to be associated with the BRCA gene mutation in as similar way as women with invasive breast cancer. The BRCA (Breast Cancer) gene is commonly referred to as “The Breast Cancer Gene.” If someone inherits a broken version (mutation) of this gene at conception, they carry a very high lifetime risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer.
Просмотров: 2283 Breast Cancer School for Patients
New Research Links Post-menopausal Weight To Breast Cancer
 
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Researchers have discovered a new link between weight and breast cancer risk.
Просмотров: 1889 CBS Philly
Your Diet and Breast Cancer
 
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One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime—of that number, studies show 85 percent of women don’t have a family history. “We know that physical activity makes a difference and we know that breastfeeding makes a difference, but most people aren’t really aware that nutrition can play a role in that too,” said Jeanne Struve, a clinical dietitian with Lee Health. Things like added weight and alcohol can increase your risk of developing breast cancer. “The more alcohol you consume, the more increased risk of not just breast cancer, but all cancer. When you have higher intakes of alcohol you have lower methyl folate, and that means less elimination of carcinogens and a decreased ability for your body to repair damaged cells,” said Struve. It’s also important to keep a healthy weight. Extra weight means more estrogen is circulating in the body. “Carrying more weight does increase your risk of breast cancer, especially post-menopausal women who gain weight have a much higher risk, so lowering your weight and keeping your weight at a normal weight does make a difference,” she said. But there are foods you can add to your daily diet that can lower your risk for breast cancer—things like fiber, soy, and cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cabbage, and Brussels sprouts. “Fiber is your friend, and unfortunately, a lot of the ways that people choose to eat they have very low intakes of fiber. The average American women get about 15 grams of fiber a day, and the recommendation is a minimum of 25 grams a day,” said Struve. Studies show women who have a high intake of soluble fibers have a decreased risk of developing breast cancer. “Soluble fibers are great because they don’t just lower your risk of breast cancer, they lower your cholesterol, your risk for heart disease, they can lower blood sugars, and those are found in things like oats, beans, fruits, vegetables, and nuts and seeds too,” she said. Limiting alcohol and red meat and increasing your fruits and vegetables can keep you healthy and lower your risk for breast cancer. View More Health Matters video segments at LeeHealth.org/Healthmatters/ Lee Health in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of health care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For more than 100 years, we’ve been providing our community with personalized preventative health services and primary care to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Lee Health - Caring People. Inspiring Care. Visit LeeHealth.org
Просмотров: 18 Lee Health
HRT Increases Risk Of Breast Cancer Far More Than Previously Believed
 
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According to UPI, women receiving a specific type of hormone treatment to ease symptoms of menopause may be at much higher risk for breast cancer. Researchers from the Institute for Cancer Research in England say that risk was previously underestimated. HRT is used to treat menopause symptoms such as hot flashes, migraines, sleep problems, depression and mood swings by increasing levels of estrogen in the body. There are three types of HRT: Estrogen-only, a combination of estrogen and progestogen, or tibolone, which is a steroid that acts like estrogen and progestogen. The four-decade study found women receiving combined hormone replacement therapy, or HRT, are at about three times the risk for breast cancer as women receiving either estrogen-only HRT or tibolone. http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2016/08/23/Breast-cancer-risk-from-hormone-replacement-underestimated-study-says/9631471957228/ http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit News using http://wochit.com
Просмотров: 1274 Wochit News
Exercises After Breast Cancer Surgery
 
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Learn about the exercises you should do after breast cancer surgery from Cancer Research UK.  This video shows you how to do shoulder shrugs and shoulder circles during the first week after surgery and goes on to show you arm exercises for the second week and beyond. These exercises help you regain normal movement so you can maintain your usual routine, have radiotherapy and prevent problems in the future. Find more information on the Cancer Research UK website: http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/breast-cancer/treatment/surgery/after-surgery
Просмотров: 65498 Cancer Research UK
Best Diet For A Breast Cancer Patient
 
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Dr. Harness explains that the best diet for women with breast cancer is a heart-healthy diet, low in fat, high in good protein, and one that keeps a healthy weight range. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk.  If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Просмотров: 37706 Breast Cancer Answers®
SABCS 2017: Postmenopausal Women Who Lose Weight May Have Reduced Breast Cancer Risk
 
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Postmenopausal Women Who Lose Weight May Have Reduced Breast Cancer Risk GS5-07. Chlebowski RT, Luo J, Anderson GL, Simon M, et al. Weight change in postmenopausal women and breast cancer risk in the Women's Health Initiative Observational study. Presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium Press Conference, December 8 - More Info: http://oncoletter.ch
Просмотров: 253 oncoletter
How can yoga benefit women with breast cancer?
 
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New study shows yoga can regulate stress hormones and improve quality of life for women with breast cancer undergoing radiation therapy. For women with breast cancer undergoing radiation therapy, yoga offers unique benefits beyond fighting fatigue, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The preliminary findings were first reported in 2011 by Lorenzo Cohen, Ph.D., professor and director of the Integrative Medicine Program at MD Anderson, and are now published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. This research is part of an ongoing effort to scientifically validate mind-body interventions in cancer patients and was conducted in collaboration with India's largest yoga research institution, Swami Vivekananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana in Bangalore, India. http://www.mdanderson.org/education-and-research/departments-programs-and-labs/programs-centers-institutes/integrative-medicine-program/index.html Researchers found that while simple stretching exercises counteracted fatigue, patients who participated in yoga exercises that incorporated controlled breathing, meditation and relaxation techniques into their treatment plan experienced improved ability to engage in their daily activities, better general health and better regulation of cortisol (stress hormone). Women in the yoga group were also better equipped to find meaning in the illness experience, which declined over time for the women in the other two groups. The study also assessed, for the first time, yoga benefits in cancer patients by comparing their experience with patients in an active control group who integrated simple, generic stretching exercises into their lives. "Combining mind and body practices that are part of yoga clearly have tremendous potential to help patients manage the psychosocial and physical difficulties associated with treatment and life after cancer, beyond the benefits of simple stretching," said Cohen. To conduct the study, 191 women with breast cancer (stage 0-3) were randomized to one of three groups: 1) yoga; 2) simple stretching; or 3) no instruction in yoga or stretching. Participants in the yoga and stretching groups attended sessions specifically tailored to breast cancer patients for one-hour, three days a week throughout their six weeks of radiation treatment. Participants were asked to report on their quality of life, including levels of fatigue and depression, their daily functioning and a measure assessing ability to find meaning in the illness experience. Saliva samples were collected and electrocardiogram tests were administered at baseline, end of treatment, and at one, three and six months post-treatment. Women who practiced yoga had the steepest decline in their cortisol levels across the day, indicating that yoga had the ability to help regulate this stress hormone. This is particularly important because higher stress hormone levels throughout the day, known as a blunted circadian cortisol rhythm, have been linked to worse outcomes in breast cancer. Additionally, after completing radiation treatment, only the women in the yoga and stretching groups reported a reduction in fatigue. At one, three and six months after radiation therapy, women who practiced yoga during the treatment period reported greater benefits to physical functioning and general health. They were more likely to find life meaning from their cancer experience than the other groups. According to Cohen, research shows that developing a yoga practice also helps patients after completing cancer treatment. "The transition from active therapy back to everyday life can be very stressful as patients no longer receive the same level of medical care and attention. Teaching patients a mind-body technique like yoga as a coping skill can make the transition less difficult." Through a grant from the National Cancer Institute, Cohen and his team are now conducting a Phase III clinical trial in women with breast cancer to further determine the mechanisms of yoga that lead to improvement in physical functioning, quality of life and biological outcomes during and after radiation treatment. A secondary aim of the trial, but one of great importance, stressed Cohen, is assessing cost efficiency analysis for the hospital, health care usage costs in general and examining work productivity of patients. MD Anderson recognizes the growing body of research indicating that relaxation-based interventions can contribute to the well-being of people with cancer. Through the Integrative Medicine Program, complementary therapies, such as yoga, are offered at MD Anderson's Integrative Medicine Center, and are used in concert with mainstream care to manage symptoms, relieve stress, enhance quality of life and improve outcomes for patients and their caregivers.
Просмотров: 5107 MD Anderson Cancer Center
‘Holy grail’ of breast cancer prevention in high-risk women may be in sight
 
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Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers Ms Emma Nolan, Professor Geoff Lindeman and colleagues have discovered that an existing medication could have promise in preventing breast cancer in women carrying a faulty BRCA1 gene. Read more at: http://www.wehi.edu.au/news/breast-cancer-prevention-in-high-risk-women-may-be-in-sight
Просмотров: 1467 WEHImovies
The Safest Estrogen Foods for Reducing Breast Cancer Risk - Dr. Veronique
 
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To discover what surprising foods lower your breast cancer risk, watch this video now. In this interview, Dr. Veronique Desaulniers reveals the truth about soy and breast cancer. And destroys the myths about the safest estrogen foods. You’ll learn the three ways this all-natural food works at reducing breast cancer risk. Also, how eating just 5 teaspoons a day of this type of seed lowered cancer markers in patients diagnosed with breast cancer by up to 71%. Find out the 4 things you need to look for in the safest estrogen foods. Hear about the thousand year old history of one healing food that’s still used today to lower breast cancer risk. And the reason why GMOs are so dangerous. To learn more ways to prevent, treat and beat cancer, you can watch Episode 1 & 2 of A Global Quest NOW for FREE by following this link: http://bit.ly/free-AQG-episodes-YT . To watch Episode 1 & 2 of A Global Quest docu-series for FREE, click here: http://bit.ly/a-global-quest-free-yt Visit our website: http://bit.ly/official-website-ttac-yt Join TTAC's 1 million FB fans: http://bit.ly/TTAC-Facebook-YT Follow us on PINTEREST: http://bit.ly/TTAC-Pinterest-YT Find us on INSTAGRAM: http://bit.ly/TTAC-Instagram-YT Support our mission by commenting and sharing with your friends and family below. -------------------------------------------------- About The Truth About Cancer -------------------------------------------------- The Truth About Cancer’s mission is to inform, educate, and eradicate the pandemic of cancer in our modern world. Every single day, tens of thousands of people just like you are curing cancer (and/or preventing it) from destroying their bodies. It’s time to take matters into your own hands and educate yourself on real cancer prevention and treatments. It could save your life or the life of someone you love. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Inside The Truth About Cancer Docu-series --------------------------------------------------------------------- Doctors, researchers, experts, and survivors show you exactly how to prevent and treat cancer in our 3 original docu-series: The Quest for The Cures, The Quest For The Cures Continues, and The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest. In our docu-series you’ll travel with Ty Bollinger who lost both his mother and father to cancer (as well as 5 other family members). Ty travels the country and the globe and sits down with the foremost doctors, researchers, experts, and cancer conquerors to find out their proven methods for preventing and treating cancer. You can watch Episode 1 & 2 NOW for FREE by following this link: http://bit.ly/a-global-quest-free-yt Please join our email list to be notified of all upcoming events (including free airings of our docu-series): http://bit.ly/join-the-mission-ttac Learn more about our latest docu-series The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest here: http://bit.ly/agq-silver-ttac-yt --------------------------------------- About Ty Bollinger --------------------------------------- Ty Bollinger is a devoted husband, father, a best-selling author, and a Christian. He is also a licensed CPA, health freedom advocate, cancer researcher, former competitive bodybuilder, and author of the best-selling book Cancer - Step Outside the Box, which has sold over 100,000 copies worldwide. After losing his mother and father and several family members to cancer, Ty’s heartbreak and grief coupled with his firm belief that chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery were the NOT the most effective treatments available for cancer patients led him on a path of discovery. He began a quest to learn everything he possibly could about alternative cancer treatments and the medical industry. What he uncovered was shocking. On his journey, he’s interviewed cutting-edge scientists, leading alternative doctors, and groundbreaking researchers to learn about hidden alternative cancer treatments. What he uncovered help to create The Truth About Cancer and its 3 awe-inspiring docu-series: The Quest for The Cures, The Quest For The Cures Continues, and The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest. Ty has touched the hearts and changed the lives of thousands of people around the world. Ty speaks frequently at conferences, local health group meetings, churches, and guest stars on multiple radio and TV shows and writes for numerous magazines and websites. -----------------------------------
Просмотров: 6988 The Truth About Cancer
Powerful tool for some women with breast cancer
 
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Women with cancer on the left side, who also require radiation, are at higher risk for heart trouble down the road. That's why Sunnybrook is increasingly using a technique called Active Breathing Control, or ABC. Eligible patients simply hold their breath during treatment with the help of special equipment. It's a powerful tool to protect heart health while fighting cancer.
Просмотров: 3462 Sunnybrook Hospital
Anastrozole duration for post-menopausal breast cancer patients after 5 years of endocrine therapy
 
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Prof Michael Gnant speaks with ecancer at SABCS 2017 to discuss the outcomes of a multi-centre phase III randomised trial of 2 or 5 years of anastrozole for post-menopausal breast cancer patients after 5 years of endocrine therapy. He describes the near-identical outcomes of patients in terms of disease free survival and overall survival, and notes the improved treatment adherence and reduced risk of bone fractures in women receiving the shorter course.
Просмотров: 59 ecancer
Update After 1st Chemo Session - Stage 3 Breast Cancer
 
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Update video after my first chemo treatment with stage 3 aggressive breast cancer and chemotherapy. 🔻Yep, I am definitely a hot mess in the video! I will be sharing my journey with chemo, surgery, radiation and eventually reconstruction. Please be patient with me as I learn to navigate thru YouTube and become more comfortable with videos. My name is Andrea. I am 38 years old, with no family history of breast cancer. I started this channel to document my journey and offer my experience and hope to others that may be going through similar situations. I hope to motivate women to conduct self-exams, seek medication attention for abnormal growths and obtain medically recommended diagnostic testing. You can find also find me FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/andreaskisses/ To get in contact with me email- breastcancerchoseme@gmail.com
Просмотров: 731 Breast Cancer Chose Me
LiveWell After Breast Cancer | Cardio Workout #1
 
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LiveWell after breast cancer is The Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center initiative to get breast cancer survivors and their families moving, through fun and easy exercise routines. Exercise for every level and ability with modifications shown along the way. Exercise is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy after being diagnosed with breast cancer. Research has shown that women who exercise have an improved quality of life and have fewer side effects during and following treatment. Exercise has also been shown to enhance overall health and wellness, improve mood, reduce fatigue, and increase stamina. Some research suggests that exercise may reduce the chances of a breast cancer recurrence. Learn more at: http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/kimmel_cancer_center/centers/breast_cancer_program/exercise_and_breast_cancer.html
Просмотров: 1509 Johns Hopkins Medicine
Donna Williams - living breastless after breast cancer
 
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Women having mastectomy are generally presumed to want to have reconstruction or at least breast prostheses. I was a 14C, rather medium sized in the breast department. But I chose to have neither, go 6 months as a one breasted woman before my 2nd mastectomy and explore ways of living confidently and femininely with my mastectomied chest. Here I demonstrate how I went about doing some of that. I hope others find it useful. For more on women who choose to go breast free visit: http://breastfree.org/ for more on my own story visit my website: http://www.donnawilliams.net all the best with your own journeys. UPDATE: 2016, 5 years since breast cancer, still no recurrence, no mets WOULD YOU LIKE TO TRANSCRIBE THIS VIDEO SO IT'S ACCESSIBLE TO THE DEAF COMMUNITY? If you transcribe it, send me the transcript to bookings@donnawilliams.net and I'll add it to the video. Polly Samuel (aka 'Donna Williams') Author, artist, singer-songwriter, screenwriter. Autism consultant and public speaker. http://www.donnawilliams.net
Просмотров: 10825 Polly Samuel (aka "Donna Williams")
Testing for Obesity Risk AND Early-Stage Breast Cancer and Chemotherapy
 
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Testing for Obesity Risk The cause of obesity is not an unsolved medical mystery, and we do not need tests to predict who will and will not gain weight Early-Stage Breast Cancer and Chemotherapy A new study shows that about 70% of women with early-stage breast cancer do not benefit from chemotherapy. Subscribe to Dr. Pam’s weekly newsletter and video clips here! https://wellnessforumhealth.com/news/ Give us a call at 614-841-7700.
Просмотров: 1958 Pamela Popper
Bra for Breast Cancer
 
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Extremely soft zipper pocket sports bra for post surgery cancer patients. http://goo.gl/MUxAQj This video describes this unique benefits of bamboo fabric on your skin for post surgery cancer patients. This bra was custom designed to make you more comfortable after surgery and help the healing process. Women who go through mastectomy or partial mastectomy are faced with discomfort from radiation and incisions. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mastectomy Because of the non-chafing and eco friendly fabric it contains no chemicals or synthetic fibers that are harmful to your skin. My Inspire Wear 6140 S. Gun Club Rd. Aurora, CO 80016 855-467-7797 About us: http://myinspirewear.com/about/ Connect with us on Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/myinspirewear?fref=ts Twitter: Instagram: #breastcancer #mastectomy #zipperbra # Use Coupon Code: 15zip for 15% off: http://goo.gl/MUxAQj
Просмотров: 4110 My Inspire Wear
Postmenopausal women who lose weight may have reduced breast cancer risk
 
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Prof Rowan Chlebowski speaks at a SABCS 2017 press session about how postmenopausal women who lose weight may have reduced breast cancer risk. Chlebowski and colleagues analyzed data from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Observational Study. This program tracks the health of postmenopausal women between the ages of 50 and 79. Participants who had a normal mammogram, no prior breast cancer, and were not underweight (BMI ≥ 18.5) were eligible for enrollment in Chlebowski’s study. Measurements for height and weight were obtained upon enrollment, and measurements were reassessed three years following. At baseline, 41 percent of women were normal weight, 34 percent were overweight, and 25 percent were obese. Of the 61,335 patients enrolled in Chlebowski’s study, 3,061 developed invasive breast cancer during an average of 11.4 years of follow-up. Compared to women with stable weight, those who lost weight (≥ 5 percent weight change) were 12 percent less likely to develop breast cancer following multivariable analysis.
Просмотров: 60 ecancer
How is breast cancer treated
 
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Today in this video i am going to tell you about How is breast cancer treated? So, Before watch our video take a moment to subscribe our channel and click on the bell button. then you will be first to know when we will post new video. here are many different breast cancer treatments, based on its type and stage, and many women get more than one type of treatment. There are “local treatments,” meaning they treat the tumor without affecting the rest of the body and “systemic treatments,” which can reach cancer cells throughout the body. Local breast cancer treatments! Surgery! Most women will need surgery as part of their breast cancer treatment, says Dr. Kruse. “It can be anything from just removing the cancer itself to removing the whole breast,” she explains. You might opt for a lumpectomy, for example, where only the part of the breast containing the cancer is removed or a mastectomy, which is removal of the entire breast. Radiation! Radiation therapy is treatment with high-energy rays (such as x-rays) or particles that destroy cancer cells. The two main types to treat breast cancer are: external beam radiation (which comes from a machine) and internal radiation (where a radioactive source is put inside the body for a short time). Not all women will need radiation but it is most often used after surgery to reduce the risk that the cancer will return. Systemic breast cancer treatments! Chemotherapy! Administered intravenously (through your vein) or by mouth, chemo is treatment with cancer-killing drugs that travel through the bloodstream to reach cancer cells all over the body. Not all women with breast cancer will need chemo but it is most commonly used: after surgery (to kill any cancer cells that may have been left behind), before surgery (to try to shrink the tumor so it may be more readily removed), or for advanced (metastatic) breast cancer. Hormone therapy! This treatment is recommended for women with hormone receptor-positive (ER-positive or PR-positive) breast cancers and it involves taking drugs (such as tamoxifen) that stop estrogen from stimulating breast cancer cell growth. Hormone therapy is often used after surgery to help reduce the risk of the cancer coming back but it is sometimes used before surgery, as well. It’s usually taken for at least five years. Targeted therapy! These are targeted drugs designed to block the growth and spread of cancer cells. They work differently than chemotherapy drugs and can sometimes work when chemo does not (they also have different side effects). Targeted therapy is most often used if you have HER-2 positive breast cancer, hormone receptor-positive (ER-positive or PR-positive) breast cancer, or if you have BRCA gene mutations. Facebook: https://goo.gl/yRvBC5 Twitter: https://goo.gl/XPSPze #Breast #Cancer #Treated
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LiveWell After Breast Cancer | Yoga Workout #1
 
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LiveWell after breast cancer is The Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center initiative to get breast cancer survivors and their families moving, through fun and easy exercise routines. Exercise for every level and ability with modifications shown along the way. Exercise is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy after being diagnosed with breast cancer. Research has shown that women who exercise have an improved quality of life and have fewer side effects during and following treatment. Exercise has also been shown to enhance overall health and wellness, improve mood, reduce fatigue, and increase stamina. Some research suggests that exercise may reduce the chances of a breast cancer recurrence. Learn more at: http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/kimmel_cancer_center/centers/breast_cancer_program/exercise_and_breast_cancer.html
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Breast Pain With Breast Cancer?
 
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Breast pain is very common among women and has many different causes. Learn more from Dr. Harness about the causes of breast pain, including whether it is related to breast cancer, in the video. Click Here To Get Dr. Harness' 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, ‪http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask‬ This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk.  If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Просмотров: 18935 Breast Cancer Answers®
Anxiety and PTSD after a Breast Cancer Diagnosis
 
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A breast cancer diagnosis can be a very traumatic event. Women often feel intense anxiety after hearing the news from their doctor. Some women will also begin to feel depressed or experience actual major depression or generalized anxiety disorder. Dr. Gail Saltz says about one in every ten women diagnosed with breast cancer will develop post-traumatic stress disorder. This comes as a result of the emotional stress associated with going through the diagnosis and treatment process. SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE EXPERT INFORMATION AND BREAKING BREAST CANCER NEWS http://www.youtube.com/user/drjayharness VISIT BREASTCANCERANSWERS.com FOR INFORMATIVE VIDEOS http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/video-categories/ SUBMIT A QUESTION http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask DOWNLOAD DR. HARNESS' 15 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR DOCTOR http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask CONNECT WITH US! Google+: http://bit.ly/16nhEnr Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BreastCancerAnswers Twitter: https://twitter.com/BreastCancerDr ______ Disclaimer: This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk. If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
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Alcohol and Breast Cancer
 
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Dr. Ellen Zakris, Touro Oncologist, discusses how alcohol consumption increases the risk of breast cancer in post-menopausal women.
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After A Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy, Is A Woman At Risk For Breast Cancer? - Dr. Wasif
 
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Dr. Wasif explains if a woman is still at risk for breast cancer after a nipple-sparing mastectomy and recalls why a family history increases the risk for this condition. For more information visit http://www.empowher.com/condition/breast-cancer.
Просмотров: 1000 EmpowHER