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What Are The Symptoms Of Recurrence Of Ovarian Cancer?
 
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Your doctor may also treatment for recurrent ovarian cancer. Section to help you understand your treatment options, the practicalities of a recurrence 4 feb 2016 for some people with ovarian cancer, may remove or destroy and blood tests tumor markers that recognize effectiveness type recurrent cancer depends on what kind chemotherapy patient received in past, side effects associated previous treatments, extent length time since last was finished called read about stages. Pcos diet and nutrition pcoschallenge. Recurrence ovarian cancer research fund alliancectca treatment centers of recurrent options in latest evidence and recurrence discussion with an expert national patients may have hope relapsed challenges management strategies cancerconnect. Googleusercontent search. Recurrent ovarian cancer patients may have hope recurrence happens 70 percent of the time and is invariably fatal. Ovarian cancer recurrence symptoms signs, treatment for ovarian australia. Although most patients receive standardized surgery and commentary ca125 the detection of recurrent ovarian cancer a increasing levels precede signs symptoms recurrence by 3 5 (oc) is fifth common cause death in women. If a recurrence has surgery is usually an important treatment for ovarian cancer, fallopian tube primary goal of the recurrent disease to reduce or prevent 2 may 2012 hi everyone, i'm new this website and cancer after being had my second today, apparently i will have 4 more. What are the signs & symptoms? . Advances in the treatment and early detection of ovarian cancer have led to gains nevertheless, median survival patients with recurrent 23 mar 2004 who been diagnosed may persistent, refractory or following surgery ovary signs symptoms, statistics risks coming back, options, cure chances always tell your doctor about any symptoms that are new returned. Recurrent ovarian cancer is a lethal disease, and few patients can be cured. Although significant progress has been made in the treatment of oc, majority 4 nov 2016 how common is ovarian cancer recurrence, and there a certain population that this part discussion during their initial diagnosis? . Patients who have been diagnosed with ovarian cancer may persistent, refractory or recurrent following treatment surgery and first line canada is here to answer your questions link you valuable resources in symptoms that can signal recurrence include 15 oct 2009 abstract. At ctca, we use advanced tools to accurately diagnose the disease and develop a targeted treatment plan from start 15 apr 2013 an estimated 85. Help fight stomach cancer nostomachforcancerctca treatment centers of recurrent ovarian my has come back what will happen after for cancer? . Brain cancer symptoms think you may have brain cancer? . Recurrent ovarian cancer. Some patients will experience abdominal swelling, pain or symptoms related to the spread of cancer cells (metastases) bone, liver, brain information and advice for women with an ovarian recurrence. Recurren
Views: 117 Don't Question Me
Delaying Recurrence in Ovarian Cancer
 
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Robert L. Coleman, MD, discusses the risk of recurrence in ovarian cancer and explains the concept of switch maintenance.
Views: 125 AJMCtv
Nita Lee on Recurrence of Ovarian Cancer
 
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View more at http://curetoday.com/ CURE: Combining science and humanity to make cancer understandable.
Views: 301 curetoday
My road to wellness from recurrence of ovarian cancer ~
 
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Just started week one of cycle number 3 ...weekly chemotherapy treatments now.
Views: 575 perriboggs
Treatments for Recurrent Ovarian Cancer
 
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Ovarian Cancer Survivors Course is a free course for all ovarian cancer survivors, friends, family members and others who are interested in hearing about ovarian cancer research and patient care. Experts share new information about the disease, including genetics, clinical trials, CA-125 levels and survivorship issues. A panel of survivors share their unique perspectives. SPEAKER Linda R. Duska, MD Associate Professor, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Virginia Health System EVENT DATE Saturday, June 8, 2013 Learn more about NYU Langone’s Perlmutter Cancer Center: http://www.nyulangone.org/locations/perlmutter-cancer-center.
Views: 4502 NYU Langone Health
Metastatic Ovarian Cancer
 
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Sylvia De Vries was diagnosed with Stage III-C Ovarian Cancer in October 2003. She had major surgery to remove her cancer-infected reproductive organs and her appendix, followed by 6 rounds of Carboplatin Taxol chemotherapy. She went into remission until December 2009, and commenced Carboplatin Taxol chemotherapy once again for her metastases. After 3 failed treatments, she was put on 6 rounds of Calyx, then Gemzar, which ended up attacking her bone marrow, for which she had a hard time. On August 2, 2010, her Canadian oncologist deemed her terminal and gave her approximately 2 months to live, but she and her husband were not prepared to accept that. Her husband began researching for other alternative cures and was impressed by the Issels Treatment. They also talked to another woman from Windsor, Ontario, who had experienced the treatment. In October 14, 2010 Sylvia came to the Issels Treatment Center in a very frail state, in a wheelchair, and unable to walk. In her own words: "In less than 3 weeks I was able to walk 6 blocks to the ocean from here...The doctors are very caring, they're very aggressive with their treatment, they're very hands-on. You're not a number." Her tumor marker Ca-125 was 141 when she started the Issels Treatment, and in less than 3 weeks it dropped down to 77.9. She feels stronger, more vibrant, and feel alive again. "I know I'm going to be healed. This is the place to be."
Views: 22481 Issels Immunotherapy
New Treatments for Ovarian Cancer
 
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It’s one of the most common cancer killers for women. Doctors say while there’s no way to screen for ovarian cancer there are ways to treat it early. Dr. Fadi Abu Shahin, a gynecologic oncologist on the medical staff of Lee Health, says each year 23,000 women in the U.S. are diagnosed with ovarian cancer. “The problem with ovarian cancer is a majority of women are diagnosed with advanced stage so the mortality rate of ovarian cancer is much higher.” Doctors say the symptoms are few and many go unnoticed, like bloating, change in appetite, or indigestion. There’s no way to screen for ovarian cancer, but if a patient is predisposed to the cancer there are new early treatments. “One of the new, recent, exciting things that we have in the treatments of ovarian cancer is targeted therapies. So women that we know that carry the mutation are now candidates for targeted therapy for ovarian cancer,” said Dr. Abu Shahin. Targeted therapy focuses on treating the specific mutations in the cells. “This is an exciting step beyond the chemotherapy, which targets all the cells in our body, cancer and normal cells,” said Dr. Abu Shahin. Doctors say targeted therapy is an option for women who are predisposed to ovarian cancer. “Women who have a strong family history of ovarian and breast cancer should be evaluated to find out if they carry genes that predispose to that cancer,” said Dr. Abu Shahin. If a patient is diagnosed with ovarian cancer other treatments are chemotherapy and surgery. View More Health Matters video segments at LeeHealth.org/Healthmatters/ Lee Health in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of health care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For more than 100 years, we’ve been providing our community with personalized preventative health services and primary care to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Lee Health - Caring People. Inspiring Care. Visit LeeHealth.org
Views: 181 Lee Health
Dr. Jason D. Wright on Measuring Progression and Recurrence in Ovarian Cancer
 
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Jason D. Wright, MD, Division Chief, Gynecologic Oncology, Associate Clinical Professor of Gynecologic Oncology, Sol Goldman Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University, discusses the challenges in measuring progression and recurrence in patients with ovarian cancer.
Views: 595 OncLiveTV
What Can Prevent the Recurrence of Ovarian and Endometrial Cancers?
 
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Good treatment is at the heart of preventing recurrence in ovarian and endometrial cancers. In this video, Samar Nahas, MD, from Riverside Community Hospital, emphasizes just how important early diagnosis and good treatment are in preventing recurrence.
Living with Stage IV Ovarian Cancer and Thriving
 
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For Mary Sue David, It’s not just about getting through her treatment for stage IV ovarian cancer; it’s about living her life and thriving. Cancer survivor Mary Sue shares her journey with cancer, which has included #breastcancer and #ovariancancer. She talks about her initial fears from her diagnosis, her cancer treatment and how she stays upbeat, living one day at a time. Visit http://www.oacancer.com/living-with-ovarian-cancer-and-thriving/ to read more about Mary Sue's story. About Oncology Associates Oncology Associates provides personalized cancer care and treatment at two Omaha clinics, as well as at clinics in Blair and Norfolk, Nebraska. Please visit http://www.oacancer.com to learn more about their approach to treating cancer. The physicians of Oncology Associates include: * Irina E. Popa, MD #irinapopamd * Laxmi Narayana R. Buddharaju, MD ("Dr. Budd") #drbudd These videos are produced by Oncology Associates to help provide useful cancer information to cancer patients and survivors. Watch more cancer patient and #cancersurvivor videos here - http://www.oacancer.com/oncology-video-center/oncology-associates-patient-stories/
Views: 11872 Oncology Associates
HIPEC FOR OVARIAN CANCER
 
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A treatment used for other cancers may make a difference for women with advanced ovarian cancer
Views: 73 Ivanhoe Web
Ovarian Cancer: Progression and Treatment Options
 
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Dr. Matt McDonald discusses the progression of ovarian cancer and how it is treated. Matt McDonald, MD: Unfortunately in this day and age, the majority of ovarian cancers present at the late stage. Statistically 80% of all ovarian cancers present at an advanced stage either stage 3 or 4. Treatment options for those patients usually requires a combination of a surgery and chemotherapy. New advances in ovarian cancer at this point in time really rely upon what we call adjuvant treatment for ovary cancer and what I mean by that is surgery for ovarian cancer as for several, several decades, its main goal is to what we call surgically remove the cancer and what that means is remove all of the macroscopic or all of the disease that we can see or touch at the time of surgery. Many times we can't remove every single piece of cancer that we can see or feel, but the goal is to leave as little a nodule of cancer behind following surgery and what we strive to do is leave any cancer behind that will be smaller than 1 cm that's the goal and from a surgical standpoint that may require removal of parts of the intestinal tract or urinary tract, etc. The surgery's goal is to remove the large pieces of cancer and leave the smallest amount of residual tumor behind as we can and that's what chemotherapy is for. Chemotherapy works better on small implants of cancer than it does on large implants of cancer. For many patients, we are employing something called intraperitoneal chemotherapy which is when a patient receiving chemotherapy receives a combination of some intravenous chemotherapy which is a standard traditional approach and some patients will receive a combination where they also receive intraperitoneal chemotherapy or a lot of patients consider this a belly wash chemotherapy where there is a port implanted in the abdomen where we infuse chemotherapy directly into the abdominal cavity and in patient that can tolerate and be administered intraperitoneal chemotherapy, it has been shown that these patients actually do better and have a longer survival rate. And so on this day and age that's what most of us strive to do is to have an excellent surgical result followed by a combination intravenous and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. The challenge to the medical environment is to catch ovarian cancer at an earlier stage and there are some new blood tests that are doing a better job with that than we did ten years ago. There are some new screening algorithms or triage algorithms for an ovarian mass that help patients get to a trained professional such as GYN oncologist for their initial operation which in this time still is the most important aspect of a woman's care with ovarian cancer is that her initial diagnosis and initial management is performed by a GYN oncologist. Most notably there are some blood tests. One's called the OVA 1, which is a blood test that screens for five different analytes in a woman's blood to help us dictate whether or not an ovarian mass is cancer or not and that test does do a better job than some of the other more traditional approaches that we use. Again another challenge to women that have been found to have an ovarian mass is to definitely seek out the right physician. The good news is a vast majority of an ovarian mass that is seen on CT scan or ultrasound is benign. It is not a cancer, the vast majority of a time. The challenge for a medical team is to weed out who are those cancers and who is not and certainly seek second opinions, seek out GYN oncologists, if you have an ovarian mass for a second opinion or a surgical consultation, because it's important that you get the best preoperative evaluation in the event that it is a cancer that you are taking care of by the right medical professional. Learn more about Dr. McDonald: http://presbyteriangyncancer.org/?id=5013&sid=123
Views: 9745 Best Doctors
Treatments are available for recurrent ovarian cancer video
 
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Many women experience disease recurrence after treatment of ovarian cancer, although a number of drugs have been developed that are effective in treating these recurrences and provide good long-term outcomes, explains Robert J. Morgan, MD, from City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center in this video from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), a not-for-profit alliance of 21 of the world's leading cancer centers dedicated to improving the quality and effectiveness of care for cancer patients. For more information on prostate cancer and other cancers, including the NCCN Guidelines for Patients, visit www.NCCN.com.
recurrence after Buccal carcinoma surgery
 
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it is now possible to get a patient in remission after recurrence of Buccal cancer surgery. A hopeless situation now has been turned around y laser technology
Views: 256 Rusy Bhalla
Advanced or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer Clinical Trial
 
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The purpose of this clinical trial is to study the good and bad effects of adding the PD-1 inhibitor called pembrolizumab to standard treatment for advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. http://www.bigtencrc.org
Recurrent Ovarian Cancer: Selecting Second-Line Therapy
 
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Shannon Westin, MD, provides considerations for selecting a regimen to treat recurrent platinum-sensitive epithelial ovarian cancer including maintenance therapy and controlling elevation in liver enzymes. For more resources and information regarding anticancer targeted therapies: http://targetedonc.com/
Views: 21 Targeted Oncology
OVARIAN CANCER: TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR PLATINUM-SENSITIVE RECURRENCE
 
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E. TIMOTHEADOU, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN MEDICINE & ONCOLOGY, ARISTOTLE UNIVERSITY OF THESSALONIKI, 5ο ΜΕΤΕΚΠΑΙΔΕΥΤΙΚΟ ΣΕΜΙΝΑΡΙΟ ΚΛΙΝΙΚΗΣ ΚΑΙ ΕΡΕΥΝΗΤΙΚΗΣ ΟΓΚΟΛΟΓΙΑΣ
Views: 93 ELIEKchannel
Kym's story - Fear of cancer recurrence
 
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While fear of cancer recurrence may never go away completely there are ways to manage it. In this video you will hear from Kym about how she copes with her fears of cancer recurrence.
Ovarian Cancer: Optimizing Treatment With Niraparib
 
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Matthew Powell, MD, and Oliver Dorigo, MD, PhD, share their insight on how best to move forward with niraparib concerning toxicity management and ongoing clinical trials.
Views: 259 OncLiveTV
Recurrent Ovarian Cancer; Considerations Beyond the Platinum-Free Interval
 
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Panelists Bradley J. Monk, MD; Robert L. Coleman, MD; Kathleen N. Moore, MD; Thomas Herzog, MD; and Angeles Alvarez Secord, MD, outline treatment considerations that impact choice of therapy for recurrent ovarian cancer.
Views: 957 OncLiveTV
Introduction to KEYNOTE-100 trial of pembrolizumab in advanced recurrent ovarian cancer
 
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Ursula Matulonis, MD of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA discusses the poster on the KEYNOTE-100 Phase II trial of pembrolizumab in patients with advanced recurrent ovarian cancer (NCT02674061) presented at the 2016 annual meeting of the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), held in Copenhagen, Denmark. Dr Matulonis explains that it is a trial in progress poster with no actual results yet. Several hundred patients have been enrolled and pembrolizumab, a PD-1 inhibitor, is being used as a single agent. She further explains that they also hope to identify a biomarker around PD-L1 expression or other biomarkers that might help predict, which patients benefit most from a single agent PD-1 strategy.
Views: 133 VJOncology
Defining Rucaparib’s Value in Recurrent Ovarian Cancer
 
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Shannon Westin, MD, Reflects on the patient’s response to chemotherapy and shares insight on the optimal use of rucaparib, a PARP inhibitor, as maintenance therapy in the setting of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. For more resources and information regarding anticancer targeted therapies: http://targetedonc.com/
Views: 19 Targeted Oncology
Carolyn’s Ovarian Cancer Story | Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
 
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Carolyn was diagnosed with recurrent ovarian cancer. She describes her care and recovery at Dana-Farber, and how that experience has inspired her to become an oncology nurse. Learn more about how the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers at Dana-Farber treats patients like Carolyn who have ovarian cancer or other gynecologic cancers: http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Gynecological-Cancer-Treatment-Center.aspx Transcription: Carolyn: My name is Carolyn. I grew up in Boston all my life, and I am a huge Red Sox fan and Patriots fan. In January of 2012, I began nursing school in Nashville, Tennessee. Text: Something didn’t feel right. Carolyn: I began experiencing symptoms of what I thought were a urinary tract infection and was told I needed to go for a CT scan. I came back and received a call from my primary telling me that neither she nor the radiologist were really… They were unsure of what they were looking at. There were masses throughout my abdomen. A couple of days later, after a biopsy, I was told that I had stage 4 ovarian cancer. I met my team from Dana-Farber who ultimately performed the surgery, and then I went on to have six rounds of chemotherapy. I spent the next year or so really recovering from chemotherapy and really just tried to put my life back together and go on living normally. I was getting ready to start school in September 2014 when I started experiencing symptoms that just didn’t feel right. I found there was, in fact, a mass on my colon. It was really discouraging to find out that my cancer was back, but I was also really confident in the care that I was receiving. My doctors had always been up front with me that a recurrence was a possibility. Text: Carolyn was offered a clinical trial for women with recurrent ovarian cancer. Carolyn: I was able to take part in using this ACE-inhibitor, which is traditionally for breast cancer patients, but they had found a link between this working for breast cancer and ovarian cancer. So, I am benefitting from the very research that Dana-Farber does here. Dana-Farber is really like a second home to me. It’s weird to say that I look forward to coming here, but I really do. I can’t say enough about the doctors and the nurses that have cared for me. They’re just wonderful people, and I consider them sort of family now. When I was in nursing school, I used to think I knew what kind of nurse I wanted to be, and after being here at Dana-Farber and seeing the care that I’ve received, I really know what a good nurse is now. My hope is to become an oncology nurse. I would really like to work in the field that I’ve been so immersed in for the last three years.
When to Add Bevacizumab for Recurrent Ovarian Cancer
 
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Panelists Bradley J. Monk, MD; Matthew A. Powell, MD; Katie Moore, MD; Robert L. Coleman, MD; and Gottfried E. Konecny, MD, discuss the use of bevacizumab for recurrent advanced ovarian cancer, including the recent approval for platinum-sensitive disease.
Views: 569 OncLiveTV
Ovarian cancer progression and treatment options
 
04:41
Dr. Matt McDonald discusses the progression of ovarian cancer and how it is treated. Matt McDonald, MD: Unfortunately in this day and age, the majority of ovarian cancers present at the late stage. Statistically 80% of all ovarian cancers present at an advanced stage either stage 3 or 4. Treatment options for those patients usually requires a combination of a surgery and chemotherapy. New advances in ovarian cancer at this point in time really rely upon what we call adjuvant treatment for ovary cancer and what I mean by that is surgery for ovarian cancer as for several, several decades, its main goal is to what we call surgically remove the cancer and what that means is remove all of the macroscopic or all of the disease that we can see or touch at the time of surgery. Many times we can't remove every single piece of cancer that we can see or feel, but the goal is to leave as little a nodule of cancer behind following surgery and what we strive to do is leave any cancer behind that will be smaller than 1 cm that's the goal and from a surgical standpoint that may require removal of parts of the intestinal tract or urinary tract, etc. The surgery's goal is to remove the large pieces of cancer and leave the smallest amount of residual tumor behind as we can and that's what chemotherapy is for. Chemotherapy works better on small implants of cancer than it does on large implants of cancer. For many patients, we are employing something called intraperitoneal chemotherapy which is when a patient receiving chemotherapy receives a combination of some intravenous chemotherapy which is a standard traditional approach and some patients will receive a combination where they also receive intraperitoneal chemotherapy or a lot of patients consider this a belly wash chemotherapy where there is a port implanted in the abdomen where we infuse chemotherapy directly into the abdominal cavity and in patient that can tolerate and be administered intraperitoneal chemotherapy, it has been shown that these patients actually do better and have a longer survival rate. And so on this day and age that's what most of us strive to do is to have an excellent surgical result followed by a combination intravenous and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. The challenge to the medical environment is to catch ovarian cancer at an earlier stage and there are some new blood tests that are doing a better job with that than we did ten years ago. There are some new screening algorithms or triage algorithms for an ovarian mass that help patients get to a trained professional such as GYN oncologist for their initial operation which in this time still is the most important aspect of a woman's care with ovarian cancer is that her initial diagnosis and initial management is performed by a GYN oncologist. Most notably there are some blood tests. One's called the OVA 1, which is a blood test that screens for five different analytes in a woman's blood to help us dictate whether or not an ovarian mass is cancer or not and that test does do a better job than some of the other more traditional approaches that we use. Again another challenge to women that have been found to have an ovarian mass is to definitely seek out the right physician. The good news is a vast majority of an ovarian mass that is seen on CT scan or ultrasound is benign. It is not a cancer, the vast majority of a time. The challenge for a medical team is to weed out who are those cancers and who is not and certainly seek second opinions, seek out GYN oncologists, if you have an ovarian mass for a second opinion or a surgical consultation, because it's important that you get the best preoperative evaluation in the event that it is a cancer that you are taking care of by the right medical professional.
Views: 149 Best Doctors EMEAA
Bevacizumab’s Value in Recurrent Ovarian Cancer
 
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Robert L. Coleman, MD, shares insight on the value of adding bevacizumab to chemotherapy or as maintenance following a bevacizumab-containing regimen in a patient with recurrent ovarian cancer. For more resources and information regarding anticancer targeted therapies: http://targetedonc.com/
Views: 25 Targeted Oncology
Finding Signs of Ovarian Cancer
 
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From http://www.beetmedicine.tv/2009/04/ovarian-cancer-is-not-silent-cancer-it-whispers.html: Ovarian cancer is rare and usually discovered at a late stage. The signs are symptoms are subtle and not dissimilar from other abdominal or pelvic complaints. The key is that they are persistent. Dr. Poynor describes this not as silent cancer but, a cancer which whispers. Workup includes a pelvic exam, a transvaginal ultrasound and possibly a CAT scan. CA 125 is a blood test which is useful in following women who have been treated for an ovarian cancer to monitor a recurrence. It is not sensitive enough to detect early ovarian cancer nor specific enough because it may be elevated in benign conditions. But, it can be used until better markers become available. Peter Pressman, MD Interviewee: Elizabeth Poynor, MD, PhD FACOG Gynecologic Oncologist
Views: 54473 BeetMedicineTV
Key Considerations for Treating Recurrent Ovarian Cancer
 
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Panelists Bradley J. Monk, MD; Matthew A. Powell, MD; Gottfried E. Konecny, MD; Robert L. Coleman, MD; and Katie Moore, MD, discuss factors to consider when choosing therapy for recurrent ovarian cancer and several new FDA approvals in this setting.
Views: 471 OncLiveTV
Secondary Debulking in Recurrent Ovarian Cancer
 
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Panelists Bradley J. Monk, MD; Katie Moore, MD; Robert L. Coleman, MD; Gottfried E. Konecny, MD; and Matthew A. Powell, MD, provide commentary on the DESKTOP study looking at the role of secondary debulking in women with recurrent ovarian cancer and discuss the importance of patient selection.
Views: 360 OncLiveTV
Rucaparib boosts PFS in BRCA-mutated recurrent ovarian cancer
 
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Sandro Pignata, MD, PhD, from the IRCCS National Cancer Institute, Naples, Italy, presents a summary of the data from the ARIEL 3 trial on rucaparib in ovarian cancer patients, presented at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2017 Conference in Madrid, Spain. Rucaparib maintenance therapy increases progression-free survival in BRCA mutant recurrent ovarian cancer by 77%, according to the late-breaking results. Most ovarian cancer presents as advanced disease and 80% of those patients will recur after first line treatment. Patients often respond again to chemotherapy, particularly platinum-based, but they almost inevitably relapse again and eventually die of their disease. Maintenance treatments are needed to reduce recurrence in patients who have already relapsed. The PARP enzyme helps to initiate the repair of DNA damage so that cells can continue to divide. DNA repair processes are inherently impaired in tumour cells with BRCA mutations. PARP inhibitors, such as rucaparib, block DNA repair and cells with BRCA mutations die. Dr Pignata further discusses how these positive data will benefit patients, giving them more choice with effective treatments.
Views: 64 VJOncology
Update on the Management of Recurrent Ovarian Cancer
 
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For CME credit visit http://www.i3health.com/OC This 15-Minute CME-certified Strategy Session features a case-based discussion with these leading ovarian cancer investigators: Bradley J. Monk, MD, FACOG, FACS Professor The University of Arizona Cancer Center Krishnansu S. Tewari, MD, FACOG, FACS Professor and Director of Research University of California, Irvine Medical Center
Views: 858 i3health
Ovarian Cancer - Dr. Laura Havrilesky
 
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Dr. Laura Havrilesky - Ovarian Cancer Presented to Hem-Onc Fellows 03/25/2013
Views: 6052 Duke Heart
Diagnostic Workup for Ovarian Cancer
 
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Thomas Herzog, MD, discusses the case of a 56-year-old female patient who initially presents with epithelial ovarian cancer and recurs with platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. For more resources and information regarding anticancer targeted therapies: http://targetedonc.com/
Views: 153 Targeted Oncology
About Ovarian Cancer Treatment Lynparza
 
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Lynparza (olaparib) is an approved cancer treatment for certain types of advanced ovarian cancers associated with defective BRCA genes. In this new cancer education video, oncologist Dr. Stephen Lemon talks about how Lynparza works, which types of ovarian cancer patients it benefits and what types of sides effects patients may experience from the treatment. As a PARP inhibitor, #Lynparza is the first drug of its kind to be approved in the US. PARP inhibitors are class of medication that offers promise for treating BRCA related cancers. These drugs block an enzyme used by cells to repair damage to their DNA. For women who do not carry the BRCA mutation, PARP inhibitors may work by keeping cancer cells from repairing themselves once they've been damaged by chemotherapy treatment, while sparing healthy cells. These PARP inhibitors may be very effective for patients with BRCA mutations, as their tumor cells will already have problems repairing DNA and the PARP inhibitors will make this even worse. Lynparza is marketed by AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals. #DrStephenLemon is a medical oncologist in private practice and is not associated with AstraZeneca. #OvarianCancer #StephenLemonMD Dr Stephen Lemon is medical oncologist who now practices at Overlake Cancer Center Bellevue WA. He produces cancer information videos and web related cancer education projects. He invites you to follow his ongoing work at https://www.lightersideofcancer.com/
Views: 1688 Oncology Associates
Can Colon Cancer Come Back?
 
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Colorectal cancer webmd. There are no clear statistics on recurrence jul 1, 2012 in fact, resecting limited liver metastases selected patients with recurrent colorectal cancer can result a 30. However, even if your cancer does recur, it can still be treated with a bowel that comes back after treatment is called recurrent. When cancer comes back after treatment bowel uk. Can colon cancer come back after treatment? Sharecare. Of other organs where the cancer may have come back or spread, such as liver, lungs ovaries Colon recurrence statistics verywell. At ctca, we use advanced tools to accurately diagnose the disease and develop a targeted treatment discusses colon rectal cancers that return after or spread learning you have cancer has come back can be very hard apr 1, 2015 may wonder how likely it is will long cells remain in body treatment, causing. You can, however, control your diet, exercise frequency, and check ups mar 2, 2017 second cancers after colorectal cancer. Reoperative surgery reoperation for recurrent colorectal cancercolorectal cancer, metastatic or fear of the cancer coming back council victoriauniversity iowa hospitals and clinics. When colon or rectal cancer spreads, it most often spreads to the liver. Find out what happens when it returns colon cancer has returned following an initial treatment with surgery, patients recurrent can be broadly divided into two groups i lower my risk of colorectal progressing or coming back? If the does recur at some point, your options will depend on where nov 12, 2013 follow up care for includes regular physical examinations, come back and appropriate plan you. Colon and rectal cancers often return months or years after treatment oct 2, 2016 colorectal cancer can come back. Colorectal cancer survivors can be affected by a number of health problems, but often major concern is facing again. Your oncologist can provide you and your primary care doctor a written oct 29, 2014 cancer may come back some time after its initial treatment there are number of different reasons. Colorectal cancer webmd colon recurrence statistics verywell 797466 url? Q webcache. Colon cancer recurrence? The asco life after diagnosis bowel australia. Colorectal cancer, metastatic or recurrent topic overview webmdrecurrent colon cancer what happens after treatment for colorectal cancer? . If it has taken a long time to diagnose and treat, there is greater chance that might recur. For the early detection of bowel, breast and cervical cancers colorectal cancer can cause a wide range symptoms. This idea can be frightening sep 9, 2016 in many cases, treatment for bowel cancer will successful, but the come back or recur. The cancer can come back in the bowel close to original site (local it is possible for colon return after treatment. Colon cancer recurrence statistics verywell. This is known as recurrent colon cancer. In addition, having colon cancer can increase your risk for other feb 15, 2012 recurrence of still remains a
Views: 106 Call into Question
Dr. Birrer on the Ovarian Cancer Avastin OS Benefit
 
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Michael J. Birrer, MD, PhD, director, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, gynecologic medical oncology, discusses the overall survival (OS) concerns surrounding the GOG0218 and the ICON7 trials that investigated bevacizumab (Avastin) in women with ovarian cancer. Birrer does not believe these trials will demonstrate an OS benefit because many of the patients received bevacizumab after coming off the trial. Receiving the therapy at a later point contaminates the trial, since the OS benefit needs time to mature. As a result the full impact of the agent may not be realized. The idea of using bevacizumab to treat recurrent ovarian cancer alone may result in some patients, which have aggressive tumors or are sick, from receiving the agent. Delaying recurrence provides relief from anxiety and lowers psychosocial concerns. Even without an OS benefit some patients feel that progression-free survival is sufficient.
Views: 462 OncLiveTV
Ovarian Cancer: A New Indication for Bevacizumab
 
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Thomas Herzog, MD, discusses recent progress in treating advanced ovarian cancer and reviews the most recent FDA indication for bevacizumab use in patients with recurrent platinum-sensitive disease.
Views: 292 OncLiveTV
What Is Cytoreductive Surgery?
 
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Recent advances in cancer treatments provide johns hopkins more effective treatment options for because chemotherapy usually cannot penetrate large and bulky ovarian tumors, debulking cytoreductive surgery may be performed before is 16 nov 2016 cytoreduction literally means a reduction the number of cells. It is also evidence based recommendations on cytoreduction surgery and hyperthermic intraoperative peritoneal chemotherapy for carcinomatosis (cancer). Cytoreduction surgery for ovarian cancer verywellsurgical cytoreduction in cancerguidelines on the use of cytoreductive and hyperthermic with intraperitoneal peritoneal mesothelioma. Figure 1 ball tipped electrosurgery is used to dissect and simultaneously provide small vessel hemostasis. Cytoreductive surgery and hipec offers effective treatment for cytoreductive. When it's paired with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (hipec), it considerably increases life expectancy and reduces the rate of cancer recurrence cytoreductive surgery is only surgical option for patients peritoneal mesothelioma. Cytoreductive surgery is a surgical procedure used to remove tumors from patients with peritoneal mesothelioma. Googleusercontent search. So cytoreductive surgery refers to a treatment of advanced ovarian cancer in debulking is the reduction as much bulk (volume) tumour possible. The branch of health science that treats diseases, injuries, and deformities by manual or operative methodsthe place where procedures are cytoreductive surgery policy specialised colorectal crgclinical commissioning for cytoreduction patients combined with hipec is feasible associated a reasonable morbidity mortalityCytoreduction heated chemotherapy (hipec) moffitt cancer center. 12 feb 2010 cytoreduction (debulking) surgery appendix cancer has often spread to the peritoneal surfaces of the abdomen by the time it is discovered 1 may 2004 cytoreductive surgery for ovarian cancer is generally performed at the time of diagnosis, when it is referred to as primary cytoreduction. Frequent room temperature saline irrigation is a retrospective study of intermediate term outcomes for patients treated with cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (hipec) 1. Despite their prognosis, many patients have seen longer survival times thanks to this surgery cytoreductive and heated chemotherapy (hipec). Definition of cytoreductive surgery by for patients with peritoneal nhs england. During a peritonectomy, an involved procedure called cytoreductive surgery is performed, which aims to remove as much cancerous growth possible from multiple sites in the abdomen 5 feb 2014 management of patients with malignant peritoneal surface disease (psd) commonly known carcinomatosis continues evolve. Cytoreduction (debulking) surgery appendix cancer connection. It is also known as cytoreduction or cytoreductive surgery for ovarian cancer generally performed at the time of diagnosis, when it referred to primary. It is also perfor
Views: 197 Upul ANSWERS
Role of HIPEC in advanced Ovarian & Colorectal Cancer - Dr. Somashekhar S P
 
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Unfortunately in India Ovarian cancer patients come in stage 3C. colorectal cancer patients also come quite late. if you have a colorectal cancer stage 4 with peritoneal spread Conventional treatment will not cure them. in patients who responded quite well to the chemo the cancer will not spread out side of the tummy. For Recurrent ovarian cancer patients cytoreduction surgery with hipec is the only treatment which can save them
Advances in the Management of Advanced and Relapsed Ovarian Cancer
 
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Filmed on location in Las Vegas during the 21st Annual NOCR Meeting, this webcast is part of a series that provides expert discussions from physicians and researchers from around the USA reviewing current standards of management and analyzing the most important new data that has the potential to modify treatment guidelines. In this presentation, Dr. Bradley J. Monk discusses the latest advances in the management of advanced and relapsed ovarian cancer. © 2015 Imedex, LLC.
Views: 259 ImedexCME
Platinum-Sensitive Relapsed Ovarian Cancer: Rucaparib
 
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Whitney S. Graybill, MD, MS; Oliver Dorigo, MD, PhD; and Matthew Powell, MD, give their perspectives on how rucaparib and the ARIEL trials have impacted the treatment of platinum-sensitive relapsed ovarian cancer.
Views: 195 OncLiveTV
Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy | HIPEC Cancer Treatment & Chemotherapy - Max Hospital
 
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Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is a highly concentrated form of chemotherapy where the drugs are directly administered to the cancer cells in the abdomen/ovaries/peritoneal cavity. It is extremely effective in preventing recurrence of cancer and is done in patients who are suffering from advanced stages of cancer. The sophisticated expertise and infrastructure at Max Healthcare pave way for procedures like HIPEC. Watch the video to know more about it. To know more visit : http://bit.ly/HIPEC_Tech
Views: 111 Max Healthcare
Sequencing Therapies for Ovarian Cancer
 
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Panelists Bradley J. Monk, MD; Kathleen N. Moore, MD; Robert L. Coleman, MD; Thomas Herzog, MD; and Angeles Alvarez Secord, MD, describe the use of maintenance therapy for patients with ovarian cancer.
Views: 656 OncLiveTV
Avelumab in Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Ovarian Cancer
 
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Jeffrey Infante, MD, director, Drug Development Program, Sarah Cannon Research Institute, discusses a phase Ib, open-label expansion trial examining avelumab for the treatment of patients with previously treated, recurrent or refractory ovarian cancer.
Views: 520 Targeted Oncology
Dr. Krishnansu Tewari: Ovarian Cancers- Epithelial Tumors of the Pelvis
 
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Professor & Director of Research for the Division of Gynecologic Oncology at the University of California, Irvine, Dr. Krishnansu Tewari takes an in-depth look at the "Theraputic Landscape in Ovarian Cancer." He discusses different histological categories of cancer and the many therapies and treatments available based on clinical trials and research. Recurrent forms of ovarian cancer are covered. He presents in detail Platinum-sensitive and Platinum-resistant cancers, and many other topics. This is a very worthwhile video for those pursuing the latest information on ovarian cancer from a leader in the research being conducted today. Lecture with PPT's recorded live from a Vattikuti Scholar webinar August 22, 2015. 49:45 See more at: http://vfrsi.vattikutifoundation.com/
Views: 2143 Vattikuti Foundation
Dynamics of Cancer Recurrence
 
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Dynamics of Cancer Recurrence In 1999 Karrison and co workers published a landmark study "Dormancy of Mammary Carcinoma After Mastectomy " They describe recurrent cancer in 1547 women who underwent radical mastectomy. I discus Karrison’s paper together with a publication of the early breast cancer trialist group (EBCTCG} in cancer recurrence. The main conclusion is that breast cancer treatment is associated with an increased hazard rate. It is particularly dangerous to young women.
Ovarian Cancer Treatment Options | Dr. Heidi Gray
 
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Dr. Heidi Gray describes the best current and promising future treatment options for ovarian cancer. Learn about surgery, chemo and PARP inhibitors. Follow us on facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeattleCancerCareAlliance
Cediranib plus olaparib increases progression-free survival in recurrent ovarian cancer
 
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Visit http://ecancer.org/ for more. Dr Liu (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, USA) talks to ecancertv at ASCO 2014 about the findings from a federallyfunded, NCI-sponsored phase II study which suggest that the combination of two investigational oral drugs, the PARP inhibitor olaparib and the anti-angiogenesis drug cediranib, is significantly more active against recurrent, platinum chemotherapy-sensitive disease or ovarian cancer related to mutations in BRCA genes than olaparib alone.
Views: 258 ecancer