Home
Search results “Parenting plan time share examples”
3 THINGS to ASK When NEGOTIATING A PARENTING PLAN
 
05:59
http://commandthecourtroom.com These are 3 things parents need to address when negotiating & creating a parenting time plan. It is important that you address these things with the other parent when negotiating & drafting a parenting plan. 1. Do you want sole custody or joint custody Custody or Legal Decision Making means your & the other parent's ability to make major decisions about the lives of your children. Decisions such as medicine, education, and personal care decisions. So you need to think about if you want sole or joint custody. Once you've hammered that out, you need to start thinking about what parenting time plan you're going to be asking the other party to share with you. There are lots of different parenting plans out there. You really should be thinking about the best interest of your kids and coming up with a plan for them so some people have a week on we got planned other people have one parent gets every other weekend so I would encourage you to do your research. Look at websites & figure out what plan works best for the kids & map it out with begin times and end times. 2. Planning Holidays Once you have in your mind whatever parenting plan that you're going to go for the next thing to do is to move onto holidays. What are you going to be requesting for different holidays. You & the other parent may not celebrate the same holidays that most other people do. For example not everybody celebrates Christmas or Easter. It’s important to define what each holiday is going to be in terms of start times and end times because really as I talked about in the video last week (https://youtu.be/9Obx_8CyBJg) that’s where people get into conflict especially around this time of year, Christmas & New Years. If you don't set start and end times it really could lead to a major incident that creates & not so great memory for the kids. 3. Vacations You also want to think about vacation parenting time. As your kids get to be school-age they're going to be getting vacation like summer vacation in most cases. Some kids go to school year round but do you want you and the other parent to have the ability to take a week or two with the kids and go out of state or take a trip to Disneyland. So it is super important for you to include this into your parenting plan & propose to the other park party what specific vacation schedule you're asking for. You also should be putting what notification schedule you want, in other words how far in advance do each of you need to let the other parent know if you're going to be taking a vacation & what sorts of information do you want to have before your child goes on vacation with the other parent. And are you willing to provide that same information. If you're going into the courtroom you really need to have outlined these things for the court with specificity. The more specific you are the better you and the other parent are going to be in the future. Especially if it dispute comes up because then you can go right to the parenting plan & look at it. If it's not in the parenting plan then you're going to probably find yourself in custody court. Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com *This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with a licensed attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case. Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com Please read the disclaimer below: This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with a licensed attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case.
Views: 7782 Command the Courtroom
Petition to Modify Custody or Parenting Time - Avoid This Mistake!
 
04:28
http://commandthecourtroom.com An example of a petition to modify custody or parenting time gone wrong. A recently consulted with a potential client and this potential client had gotten a document prepared for him. He did this to help him in preparing a petition to modify custody and parenting time with his children. What ended up happening though was when the judge took a look at the client'w petition to modify the document prepared had prepared the judge found that that petition did not set forth a legal reason for custody to be modified. As a result the judge just dismissed the case and didn't even give the client a potential hearing. It doesn't happen a lot but more and more judges are doing it because they are so overwhelmed with cases and if they don't find that the person establishes the bare necessity of what they need to in their pleading, in their motion, the judge may dismiss the case. So this is a tip that I gained and want to share with you form that experience. When you are writing or preparing a petition to modify or any kind of petition, the facts of your case are very very important. You have to lay those facts out there. The judge has to understand why your case is different from all the other cases he or she is handling. The judge has to understand if you are seeking a change in custody, why a change might be warranted. For example in Arizona in order to modify custody or parenting time you have to show the judge that there's been a substantial and continuing change in circumstances. It's not enough to just say in the motion that you're preparing this, you have to set forth the reason why there's been a substantial and continuing change in circumstances. So I'm guessing that whatever state or country that you're in, if you want to change something with the court, you're going to have to tell the court why it should be changed. This is where the facts become very important. You say why. For example you say maybe that it's been 5 years since the original custody and parenting plan was entered. So time has passed but keep in mind that time alone is not going to do it. You may add on for example that your child is doing differently that and she was before. Recently there has been a decline in grades or that the school is closing down. Maybe you've gotten remarried or in a new relationship. Maybe the child has new siblings or step siblings. There are a lot of reasons why a case may be changed and you have to set those forth. You have to tell the judge why you are requesting the change. Details matter. Facts matter. And if you don't lay it out there, you could end up in the same boat as the potential client I met with. Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com
Views: 13144 Command the Courtroom
Shared Custody When Parents Live in Different States
 
01:55
http://www.commandthecourtroom.com When parents live in different states it can have an impact on the visitation schedule in a child custody case.* Please read the Disclaimer below: *This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with a licensed attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case. I have an example of a client who was a fantastic father and should have gotten parenting time but because he lived far away from the mother and the child's school, the judge did not give the father parenting time with his child. There are times when fathers rights in a custody case are not recognized by the judge. So, if the parents live far apart and what I mean by far apart is living in different cities or states or country, is joint custody practicable. What determines the visitation schedule? Sometimes it can be if the parent's have a great relationship and sometimes shared custody is not. At times it makes sense that the custodial parent has sole legal decision making authority Because a child is living with the custodial parent most of the time that means the parent is probably going to be the one taking the child to the Doctor, making decisions about the child's medical needs, or making decisions on schools, education, religious affiliations, medical, daycare or personal care. So these are facts specifically that you are going to have to answer and you are going to have to decide on them based on your relationship with the other parents. 1. Where do parents live in relation to each other? 2. If parents live far apart, is joint legal custody practicable? 3. Because of geographic distance, will one parent be making most decisions anyway? 4. How is visitation schedule created? Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com
Views: 3709 Command the Courtroom
What's Involved in Modifying a Custody Agreement or Parenting Plan?
 
04:36
http://www.commandthecourtroom.com In this video I go over what's involved in modifying an existing custody or parenting time plan.* What I mean is a plan that has already been signed off or order by the court. Over the years I've had several clients hire me because after they entered into an agreement and after the court answered orders about custody & parenting time, at some point, that person and their ex decided that a different plan was in the best interest of the child or children. So they made an informal agreement that was not approved by the judge to start for example, having the person that owed child support to pay less. Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com
Views: 2486 Command the Courtroom
Proving a Parent is Unfit in a Child Custody Case
 
07:53
http://commandthecourtroom.com Proving a parent is unfit in a child custody case is not easy. Here are a few examples of how to gather evidence when dealing with substance abuse, child abuse or neglect. ☎️Do you need to contact me? You may call my office at 602-230-2333 or make and appointment by visiting: https://hernandezfirm.com/contact/ Please read the Disclaimer below: *This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with a licensed attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case. I've also included a real case where I represented a father with 2 children where the mother was addicted to methamphetamines. If you are seeking sole custody of your child one way to do this is to prove that the other parent is unfit. Proving unfitness of a parent is not always easy to do. In my practice I have been able to prove unfitness of a parent by proving evidence of drug abuse, alcohol abuse, alcoholism, etc. This includes both illegal drugs and prescription drugs. If the other parent has a history of drug abuse for a significant number of years this should be brought before the court. Also important is whether or not they are currently in a drug or alcohol treatment program. Have they been through treatment or rehab but continue to relapse? However they don’t have to have a drug or alcohol problem for a number of years. If you can prove that their is drug or alcohol abuse going on presently this is also taken into consideration. There are a things you can do to help prove drug abuse in a custody case: 1. Request ongoing court ordered drug tests in your custody case. A failed drug test in a custody case can be a good indication of drug addiction in the parent. 2. Be required to get a drug screening and be evaluated for a drug treatment program at treatment center. This involves being interviewed and assessed on how significant the substance abuse is. The center can then recommend a treatment protocol to follow. If the other parent fails to follow the treatment program this is very good for your case. Another Way to Show that a parent is unfit is to show evidence of child abuse or child neglect. Allegations of child abuse are very serious, so you must be prepared to back it up with proof. Abuse includes physical abuse, emotional abuse Some examples of child neglect can be not providing meals when they should, skipping meals,, not monitoring the child doing homework, missing school, being left alone at house, if they go to school tired or dirty, or without lunches, etc. If you can show a pattern of neglect it can show the parent is neglectful and should not have custody or parenting time. Also, if there is evidence of child abuse such as police reports, criminal conviction, restraining or protection orders they are good pieces of evidence to provide the judge in your custody battle. Now keep in mind that Just because the other parent has a substance abuse problem it does not necessarily mean they are unfit. The judge will look at many factors which are called the ‘Best Interest of the Child’ factors which by law the court has to consider all as a whole when making a decision in a custody case. So I would not hang my hat on just this one factor. It might be that the judge not give you sole custody but reduce the parenting time of the other parent. These are just a few examples to show unfitness of a parent in custody case. Substance Abuse and Neglect, Abuse are some very common issues that come through my office and which I have been successful in proving and securing sole custody of a child. Wendy Hernandez is founder of ‘Command the Courtroom’ and a family law attorney in Phoenix Arizona. ► Download 'Best Interest of the Child' Free Checklist at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom/ ► Law Firm Website: http://www.hernandezfirm.com
Views: 112935 Command the Courtroom
Parenting Time Agreement & Visitation Schedule
 
03:36
http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Train your mind to think & your mouth to speak when you go into court for your child custody decision making or parenting time hearing.* Please read the Disclaimer below: *This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with a licensed attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case. How to prepare for a child custody hearing is crucial when you are in a custody battle. If a mother and father have joint custody they must appear in court and the judge must rule on a parenting time schedule and calendar. Last week I was in court representing my client who was the mother in a hotly contested divorce & custody case regarding parenting time for 2 young children. In preparing her case in the 2 weeks leading up to the hearing, I conditioned the Mother to think in terms of what is best for the children. The mother and father were trying to put together a parenting time schedule and each presented their own schedule. What I stressed to my client is that she needed to create a schedule that worked best for her children and not herself. So instead of testifying how her proposed schedule was good because it worked around her ‘work’ schedule she spoke about why the schedule was best for her children. In contrast the father in the case only spoke about what was convenient for him, that worked around his work schedule. It was all about him. When asking a judge to rule in your case you must remember that is not about you. When you are at a custody trial and in the courtroom it is all about the children. Whatever you say, present or propose must always been in the best interest of the children. The judge will rule on what creates the most consistency and stability for the children. So you should train your mind to make this about the children and give testimony and the reasons why the schedule you are proposing will create the most consistency and stability for the children. Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com
Views: 7979 Command the Courtroom
Don't Make This Mistake in Child Custody
 
04:40
http://commandthecourtroom.com In this video I talk about what happens if you choose to simply do nothing in your custody case. The short answer is, if you don't do anything in your case it's not going to be pretty. There are probably a couple of things that can happen. The first thing that can happen is if someone has filed a petition against you and their asking for a specific result and you haven't responded, or you haven't made an appearance in that case, you haven't responded to discovery requests, you're not showing up for hearings. The likely result is that the judge is going to enter a judgement against you. In some states this is called a Default Judgement. In a case where you are not doing anything, the other party is probably going to get everything that he or she wants. I have not had this happen in a number of years, but there have been a couple of times where the other party does nothing and what ends up transpiring is me and my client go to a hearing. A judge takes testimony and my client makes requests about whatever he or she is asking for and the judge grants those requests. The second thing that could happen if you do nothing in your case is potentially be found in contempt of court. If there are court orders in place where the judge is telling you to do X.Y and Z and you ignore those orders, the judge is going to look at it as you are thumbing your nose up at the court. And the judge could sanction depending on whatever it is that you are not or should be doing. The judge could order you to pay a financial penalty or put in jail. The judge could take away time between you and your kids. So there are a lot of things the judge could do. I wanted to cover this topic because a few weeks ago a potential client came into my office and she had had a case filed against her months ago. The case was the other parent was seeking to modify existing custody arrangement and parenting time arrangement. And although the parties had never been to court before, they had been making decisions about their child together and in fact the child was spending half the time with the potential client..the mother. But in the petition that her ex was filing was asking for full decision making and he was asking that the child spend all of the time except for every other weekend with him. So because this potential client hadn't responded, she was on the verge of getting a default judgement against her. And this was something that was clearly not in the best interest of the child. So I scrambled and tried to help her do damage control. We have yet to find out if we have done that. I hate to see anyone in that position especially when they are actively involved in their child's life. Especially when their child loves them and needs them. And especially when it's in the best interest of the child for both parents to be involved. I know this process is scary and a lot of people kind of want to bury their head in the sand and not think about it because it stresses them out too much. Please don't do that. I'm begging you. Don't do nothing in your case! Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ and other goodies at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com
Views: 25975 Command the Courtroom
3 STEPS to Help FATHERS ENFORCE their CUSTODY RIGHTS
 
06:32
http://www.commandthecourtroom.com It's important for fathers to take the time to learn what they can do to enforce their parental rights in a custody case.* However, unless you take the time to learn the basic custody laws for your state and follow certain steps, no attorney can help you. This video is for fathers who are going through a custody battle with their ex and want more parenting time with their children or are trying to get joint custody. Most courts use the "best interest of the child" rule to determine custody and time-sharing. Here are 3 Steps to follow before appearing in custody court. 1 Identify what you are going to change now that you and the parent are not together. For example if you have traveled a lot for work when you were married to your spouse. And you have not been able to spend time with the mother or child, you need to present to the judge how you are going to modify your travel schedule so you are there for your children. Is your job going to be flexible so that you will be able to modify that schedule. Can you go in early or work or leave early. As any judge or expert will tell you, when children go through the transition when their parents are splitting up, they need consistency and stability. During your custody trial you need to convince the judge that you will be able to provide that consistency and stability even though in the past the other parent has been the one who has picked up the lion’s share of the responsibilities. So if you need to get a letter from your supervisor or a commitment that he or she will come to court to testify that you will have the flexibility then you need to do this. You have to present to the court how you are going to change things in the future. 2. Since you have never been the primary caretaker or you are a new father you can invest in some parenting classes to show the judge that you want to get the skills you need to give the kids the best care that they need. This may not be necessary if you have been a father for a long time, you may not need parenting classes. If you are a new Dad or have a newborn, this is persuasive evidence to show the court that you are willing to do whatever it takes to be the best father for your children. 3. Once you show the judge you are going to get the training you need and make adjustments to your life for the best interests of your children, you need to start walking the walk immediately, even before the case starts, or when your marriage is already falling apart and you are contemplating divorce, you need to do what you need to do right away. Start asking the mother for more time with your children and you need to get on a consistent schedule that is best for them and not what’s best for your schedule or for the other parent’s schedule. You also should document when you ask the other parent for more time. You can use texts or email as evidence in court if you are asking the kids for the weekend or want to take them on vacation and the other parent is turning you down, by all means save those texts and emails. Start gathering you proof to show this to the judge. If your custody case goes on for a year, you need to start spending as much time with your children as possible. If you do not make every effort to do this or you are turning down offers to spend more time with you children it will not look good to the court. If on the other hand you are asking constantly spend time with your children and you do spend more time with them, that will help you persuade the judge that you are going to do what it takes increase your chances immensely to get joint custody or more parenting time. Start doing it immediately. Ask for more time with the children, start showing up at those parent/teacher conferences, going to the soccer practices, start picking up and dropping off your children to school or start getting involved with the pediatrician. Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com Please read the Disclaimer below: *This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with a licensed attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case.
Views: 57967 Command the Courtroom
What You Don't Know in Divorce or Custody Case Can Hurt  You
 
05:15
In this video I share a personal experience about how NOT knowing the rules really hurt me & how it relates to your family law case.* Please read the Disclaimer below: *This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with a licensed attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case. What you DON'T know can have detrimental consequences that could affect the rest of your family's life. When you are in the midst of a custody battle or a divorce everything is on the line whether it be determining child custody, how much alimony or child support you will receive, parenting time and many other things in your family law case. So, I will use an example in my own life where I didn’t make it my business to know the rules and I ended up in a very stressful ordeal and ended up having to hire an attorney myself. So in my private practice I had an employee who some might call a ‘trouble’ employee. One day she fell in the kitchen in an office that I share with a whole bunch of other lawyers and apparently hurt herself. At the same time the other attorneys in this office find out that this employee had been hacking into their computer system and wreaking havoc on the system. So they came to me and said that she was not allowed back into the office, even if she is your employee, do what you have to do, but she can’t come back to this office. So essentially what that meant was if my employee could not come into the office then she could not work for me, which put me into a bind because I could not run my practice without an assistant so I had to let her go. It turns out her injury from falling in the office kitchen got worse and her doctor told her to find out from me what was my workers’ compensation insurance was. Well I didn’t know that I was required to have workers’ compensation insurance. It never occurred to me. She hired an attorney. What ended up happening is we settled out of court. It was around Christmas time and she needed the money, so I offered her money and she took it and the case was over. But it did cause a lot of pain in my life, I lost sleep, I cried, I hated it. And the point is I didn’t know that I needed to have workers comp insurance. Again I had not gone to business school so I didn’t know anything about the RULES of owning your own business and what you had to have when you had employees. The same thing applies to your family law case. You did not go to law school, so you are not going to know the rules in your divorce or custody case unless you make it your business to find out what the rules of the court are. So to be prepared for your child custody or divorce hearing you can achieve this in one of two ways: 1. You can go out and hire a family law attorney because of course it is their business is to know the divorce rules rules in your state 2. If you can’t afford a lawyer, then you are going to have to represent yourself so you are going to have to go out and hit the books and prepare yourself for your family law or custody case and the rules in your jurisdiction - Rules of procedure for your state - What the judge will expect of you in court -What questions the judge will ask you Make it your business to know the rules because it can really affect the rest of yours and your family’s life. Don’t’ let what you don’t know get in the way of what’s fair and is the best interest of your children. So to learn more about representing yourself in family law court visit http://www.commandthecourtroom. If you are going through a custody battle, you can flat-out HAVE my "Child's Best Interest Checklist" to position yourself to get EXACTLY what you want (yes, equal rights are a realistic possibility). Wendy R. Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ. As a divorce and child custody attorney her life’s work is to help people struggling with divorce and child custody cases. In addition to representing her clients she also founded 'Command The Courtroom' as a resource for those who want to represent themselves in their family law case. Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com
Views: 3416 Command the Courtroom
5. Honor Your Father and Mother
 
05:28
Even if You don’t Feel Like It Children owe their parents one thing. And no, it's not love. The Fifth Commandment understands that sometimes it's difficult or even impossible to love your parents. But it's almost always possible to honor them. Dennis Prager explains what that means and why it's so important. And consider this: if your children see you honoring your parents they are much more likely to honor you. Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2ylo1Yt Joining PragerU is free! Sign up now to get all our videos as soon as they're released. http://prageru.com/signup Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/29SgPaX JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2c8vsff Script: The Fifth of the Ten Commandments reads: "Honor your father and your mother." This commandment is so important that it is one of the only commandments in the entire Bible that gives a reason for observing it: "That your days may be long in the land that the LORD your God is giving you." Many people read that part of the Fifth Commandment as a reward. But while it may be regarded as a reward, the fact remains that it is a reason: If you build a society in which children honor their parents, your society will long survive. And the corollary is: A society in which children do not honor their parents is doomed to self-destruction. In our time, this connection between honoring parents and maintaining civilization is not widely recognized. On the contrary, many of the best-educated parents do not believe that their children need to show them honor, since "honoring" implies an authority figure, and that is a status many modern parents reject. In addition, many parents seek to be loved, not honored, by their children. Yet, neither the Ten Commandments nor the Bible elsewhere commands us to love our parents. This is particularly striking given that the Bible commands us to love our neighbor, to love God, and to love the stranger. The Bible understands that there will always be individuals who, for whatever reason, do not love a parent. Therefore, it does not demand what may be psychologically or emotionally impossible. But it does demand that we show honor to our parents. And it makes this demand only with regard to parents. There is no one else who the Bible commands us to honor. So, then, why is honoring parents so important? Why does the Ten Commandments believe that society could not survive if this commandment were widely violated? One reason is that we, as children, need it. Parents may want to be honored -- and they should want to be -- but children need to honor parents. A father and a mother who are not honored are essentially adult peers of their children. They are not parents. No generation knows better than ours the terrible consequences of growing up without a father. Fatherless boys are far more likely to grow up and commit violent crime, mistreat women, and act out against society in every other way. Girls who do not have a father to honor -- and, hopefully, to love as well -- are more likely to seek the wrong men and to be promiscuous at an early age. Second, honoring parents is how nearly all of us come to recognize that there is a moral authority above us to whom we are morally accountable. And without this, we cannot create or maintain a moral society. Of course, for the Ten Commandments, the ultimate moral authority is God, who is therefore higher than even our parents. But it is very difficult to come to honor God without having had a parent, especially a father, to honor. Sigmund Freud, the father of psychiatry and an atheist, theorized that one's attitude toward one's father largely shaped one's attitude toward God. For the complete script, visit https://www.prageru.com/videos/honor-your-father-and-mother
Views: 884427 PragerU
Sample Parenting Plan
 
04:45
The information contained in this video is not legal advice; but, rather information that should be used in conjunction with a local Attorney. If you don't have an "killer" Fathers' Rights Attorney, email us for a referral to a local practitioner. EMAIL: fathershelphotline@gmail.com If you like, please provide us with a synopsis of your case by completing our intake form: FREE ATTORNEY REFERRAL IN YOUR AREA WITH CASE ANALYSIS CLICK HERE: http://fathershelphotline.com/free-case/ At your request, this information will be forwarded to one of our Fathers’ Rights Attorney’s in your area. They should provide you a free case analysis so that you “know” where you stand. Also, you may wish to order a copy of our Fathers’ Rights Protection System and become a member of the National Brotherhood of Fathers’ Rights [NBFR]. TO ORDER MEMBERSHIP AND OBTAIN YOUR COPY OF THE FATHERS' RIGHTS PROTECTION SYSTEM, CLICK HERE: http://fathershelphotline.com/products/#!/The-Fathers-Rights-Protection-System/p/37696792/category=0 Membership details in the National Brotherhood of Fathers' Rights can be found at: NBFR MEMBERSHIP DETAILS: http://fathershelphotline.com The Fathers' Rights Protection System gives you over 1000 pages of material, mailed directly to your door, with exact life experiences, examples, and other information that will help you better interact with your local Attorney; giving him the direction and help that he needs to help you! The information is modeled after 1000’s of Fathers that have gained success over the years. Once you order the book, you’re a member in the NBFR. Fill out the above intake form, and forward us your key paperwork. We will forward all of this information to a Fathers’ Rights Attorney in your area and help you get the ball rolling. NBFR
Views: 50 Dennis Gac
Parenting Plan Examples
 
04:21
The information contained in this video is not legal advice; but, rather information that should be used in conjunction with a local Attorney. If you don't have an "killer" Fathers' Rights Attorney, email us for a referral to a local practitioner. EMAIL: fathershelphotline@gmail.com If you like, please provide us with a synopsis of your case by completing our intake form: FREE ATTORNEY REFERRAL IN YOUR AREA WITH CASE ANALYSIS CLICK HERE: http://fathershelphotline.com/free-case/ At your request, this information will be forwarded to one of our Fathers’ Rights Attorney’s in your area. They should provide you a free case analysis so that you “know” where you stand. Also, you may wish to order a copy of our Fathers’ Rights Protection System and become a member of the National Brotherhood of Fathers’ Rights [NBFR]. TO ORDER MEMBERSHIP AND OBTAIN YOUR COPY OF THE FATHERS' RIGHTS PROTECTION SYSTEM, CLICK HERE: http://fathershelphotline.com/products/#!/The-Fathers-Rights-Protection-System/p/37696792/category=0 Membership details in the National Brotherhood of Fathers' Rights can be found at: NBFR MEMBERSHIP DETAILS: http://fathershelphotline.com The Fathers' Rights Protection System gives you over 1000 pages of material, mailed directly to your door, with exact life experiences, examples, and other information that will help you better interact with your local Attorney; giving him the direction and help that he needs to help you! The information is modeled after 1000’s of Fathers that have gained success over the years. Once you order the book, you’re a member in the NBFR. Fill out the above intake form, and forward us your key paperwork. We will forward all of this information to a Fathers’ Rights Attorney in your area and help you get the ball rolling. NBFR
Views: 83 Dennis Gac
Co-Parenting in a High Conflict or Toxic Relationship
 
04:56
http://commandthecourtroom.com What happens when 2 people share joint custody but they are just not capable of co-parenting. This co-parenting can be either the fault of one person or mostly be the fault of both people. I have a hard time believing that the inability to co-parent is just the fault of one person. I tend to think that when there is an issue or dispute between two people some party has a role, even though it may be a very small role, in that ability to co-parent. But what if two people have been at each other's throats and the relationship has been toxic for years or sometimes it's just several months. What if that inability to co-parent is really affecting the child and showing up in the child's behaviors at home or at school. I have had the unfortunate experience of having a couple of judges really take severe action and doing something about that inability to co-parent. In a couple of my cases many years ago, some judges observed the parties and the fact that they were always in court. There was always high-conflict. There was always arguing and drama when they were having exchanges. They couldn't have any kind of conversation that didn't end up in a verbal loud dramatic arguments. What these judges did was take custody of one parent and awarded sole custody to the other parent. And they also maximized one parent's time and minimized the other parent's time. Because they felt that the child being with one parent more, that parent would be making more of the decision making and everyday decisions and it would reduce the amount of the decision making that the parents would have to have with one another. So what happened is one parent got more of the decision making and one parent got more of the parenting time, so really it could be said that one of the parent's lost out, but what really end up happening was the child lost out in these cases. The child lost out on the benefit of two parents who have something to offer him or her...have a say in his or her life. And not just for major decisions but for those everyday decisions or everyday activities, extra-curricular activities that are happening in the child's life such as at school or with their friends. This not best for the children but the judges will go to those extremes if the two parties cannot figure out a way to co-parent. Not all judges will do that but just know that there are some judges who will do that. Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com
Views: 6473 Command the Courtroom
One Common Mistake People Make in Joint Custody Cases
 
03:42
http://commandthecourtroom.com I've had an experience with a client losing joint custody because of a common mistake I've witnessed.* Please read the disclaimer below: *This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with a licensed attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case. I was just in a continuing legal education seminar and there were a lot of topics and a lot of panels that were presented and one of the things that really struck me was a presentation where the speaker was talking about how a parent who shares joint custody with the other parent had gotten custody taken away from her. What happened was she started making major decisions about her child without including the other parent in that conversation. As I thought about it I thought you know this is not the first time I've heard about something like this happening. In fact, it's come up in my practice a lot and it actually just came up last week. I had an interaction with the woman who lived in Arizona and she shares joint custody with a guy and based on what she's saying he's not the best dad. He was not an involved parent doesn't interact with their daughter at all. So she decided that she needed to move because she had more support in another state. So without asking for permission from the court or without getting the approval of the father she just left. She left the state of Arizona and this is a big problem. I think it's a big deal and I talked to her about it and I said I understand he's not the best dad in your eyes but there's a proper way to try and do this especially when you share joint decision-making with the other parents. The proper way is to actually talk to that person about what it is that you're thinking of doing whatever it is. Whether it's moving to another state; whether it's moving your child or children to a different school; whether it's to put your children on medication or whether to get your child counseling for some issues that he or she is having. These are major decisions and when you share joint decision-making with the other parents you have to that parent in the conversation. If you don't, you risk really upsetting a judge. The judge could determine that it is clear to him or her that you cannot co-parent with the other parent and because of that he or she is going to give the other parent sole custody or sole decision making. This has happened and it does happen and I don't want it to happen to you. As much as the other parent may not be involved; as much as they may be a jerk or create conflict you have to try. I would recommend that you document your attempts at having that conversation. If you can put them in an email or put them in a text message. If you meet with the other parent send an email of recapping your meeting but just make the effort. It’s really important in the eyes of the judge that you make the effort. So if you share joint decision-making talking to other parents if you have sold decision-making over your child I think you should still talk the other parent even though you may have the final say over what ultimately happens on the big issue. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com Please read the disclaimer below: This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with a licensed attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case.
Views: 10333 Command the Courtroom
Be creative in spending time with your kids! | Creative Parenting
 
03:17
Be creative in spending time with your kids! | Creative Parenting Creative Examples: Be creative in spending time with your kids! Josh shares some creative ideas that he's learned over the years. Go do something special and things that they like! This is where relationships are formed. What creative things have you done? ➤Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/JoshMcDowell ➤Website: https://www.josh.org ➤Twitter: https://twitter.com/josh_mcdowell ➤Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jmministry/ ➤Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joshdmcdowell/
Views: 2978 Josh McDowell
Other Parent Not Spending Time with Child During Their Parenting Time
 
03:22
http://commandthecourtroom.com One parenting time dispute I see is when one parent does not spend time with the child during their agreed upon parenting time. A lot of clients come to my office upset because the other parent, during their parenting time with the children, that parent is not actually spending time with the children. They are shipping the child off to the grandmother's house or leaving the child with a step-parent or sending them over to the neighbor's house. And the parent who is upset because they say if that parent is not going to spend their time they are given with the children, then they would like to spend that time. So in this situation and we are in the negotiating phase of a parenting time plan that is best for the children, I often talk about a provision called 'the first right of refusal'. If a parent can't spend with those children for the set amount of hours that was agreed upon in the parenting time agreement, then they have to give the other parent the opportunity to have the children during those times. The idea behind that is that the parent should have time with the children before any third party. So a lot of times that helps alleviate the worry or the gripe that the children are not spending time with the other parent as agreed. Having said that, I have taken this 'right of first refusal' provision to trial because in some cases there are parents who don't want it. They think it opens a whole can of worms and sometime it does. There are judges, at least where I practice, that will not include 'the right of first refusal' in the parenting plan for the very reason that it does open up a can of worms. Essentially they are saying that it is each parent's business what they do with the kids and who is watching the kids while those kids are in their care. Now it's only been a handful of judges that do this. Th'e vast majority of judges where I practice will honor a request for a right of first refusal' provision to be included in a parenting plan. A lot of people don't even realize this exists so I hope this video raises awareness and if you have that issue, you could try to reach an agreement with the other parent. Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com
Views: 2135 Command the Courtroom
10 Differences Between Good Friends and Toxic Friends
 
05:31
We all know the phrase ‘a friend in need is a friend indeed.' But did you know the difference between good friends and toxic friends? Well, we all have that one friend who is bad tempered, a little jealous, and somewhat conceited. Do you think he or she is a true friend to you? Let us see – today, we’ve got 10 major differences between good friends and toxic friends that you should consider. SUMMARY Good friends celebrate your success. Good friends respect your alone time. Good friends are caring and empathetic. Good friends respect you and value your friendship. Good friends enjoy exchanging opinions. Good friends believe your words. Good friends call you because they miss you. Good friends accept you the way you are. Good friends know that everyone has their friends, and they won’t judge you for that. Good friends know how to keep a secret. So, have you recognized some of your friends? Share this video with those who you consider the best friend ever! Don’t forget to hit that thumbs up button – it’s important for us! Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz For copyright matters please contact us at: welcome@brightside.me ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 2996957 BRIGHT SIDE
How do we decide on a parenting plan that is best for our children?
 
03:15
Law Office of Marta J. Papa, P.C. - http://consideringdivorce.com/ Marta J. Papa, a Divorce Attorney and Mediator, answers: How do we decide on a parenting plan that is best for our children? Read the transcript of this video below. The people most qualified to develop a parenting plan for children are the parents of those children. Ask any Judge and they will agree with me. The best method of deciding a parenting plan is for the parents of the children to sit down in a safe, comfortable environment and talk about their goals and concerns for their children. Then they can come to an agreement that they both think is in the best interest of the children. Those same parents then need to make very specific decisions about the following issues: 1. How the children will move back and forth between them in a pre-arranged manner so that the children have access to both parents using a predictable schedule. 2. How the parents are going to make agreements in the future about important decisions regarding the children, such as education, medical care, and religion. They can share jointly in these decisions, or one person can be in charge of each particular decision category. 3. Finally, the parents need to address various parenting issues, like: a. Who provides transportation for the kids; b. How are they going to communicate about the children and their activities in the future; c. Who pays for what expenses; d. How to handle holidays; e. Vacations; f. Dispute resolution methods in case they can’t agree in the future; g. How or who is going to decide what activities – including extracurricular activities – the children may participate in; h. Child support; i. Medical insurance; j. Any other issues they expect to arise in co-parenting their children. The best news is that as long as the children feel they are allowed to have a meaningful relationship with both parents, the actual “time plan” doesn’t matter. Studies have revealed that the schedule of moving between Mom and Dad is not what matters. It is the parents’ permission for the children to love both Mom and Dad that matters, along with minimizing parental conflict. Marta J. Papa has been helping clients navigate the legal, financial, and emotional aspects of divorce for over 25 years. Known widely as the Divorce Whisperer®, she has successfully completed over 4,000 mediated divorces and is considered an authority on mediation nationwide. Recently, through a Missouri Lawyer’s Weekly poll, she was voted by her peers as one of the “Best Divorce Attorneys in Missouri.” She was also elected by both her peers and Martindale-Hubbell to the “Bar Register of Preeminent Lawyers” in recognition of her accomplishments as a St. Louis divorce attorney. Marta can be reached at (314) 862-0202. You can view her firm profile here http://www.divorcemag.com/online-profiles/mo/st-louis-divorce-lawyers-mediators-law-office-of-marta-j-papa-pc, and visit her website here http://consideringdivorce.com/.
Views: 509 Divorce Magazine
Joliet Family Law :: Top 10 Child Custody Mistakes #1 BreslanLaw.com
 
03:55
Joliet Family Law :: Visit http://BreslanLaw.com for a free family law consultation or call (815) 726-7950 Hi- I'm Victoria Breslan a divorce and family attorney serving Joliet IL and the surrounding Will County communities. I've devoted a large part of my practice to help clients avoid common family law pitfalls and set them on the fast-track to emerge from child custody cases in the best emotional and financial shape possible. Whether you're currently in the middle of a divorce or taking your ex back to court, in this ten part video series, I'm going to address some of the most common child custody mistakes to avoid. Custody cases can be very complex. There are a lot of moving parts and not one issue is more important that another. Winning and losing a custody case is usually everything, and sometimes the only thing parents cling to in a divorce case. Over the years I have seen people do a lot of emotionally reactive things that have negatively impacted their case which could have been avoided altogether. Your goal throughout, is to be the absolute best parent that you can possibly be. Your actions and the decisions you make during this process can be life changing for you and your children. You have a better chance of coming out on top just by avoiding of these 10 common child custody mistakes. Mistake #1 -- Letting your negative emotions toward your spouse cloud your judgment. One of the biggest mistakes I see individuals involved in custody matters make is to let their personal animosity towards the other parent take precedence to the best interests of their child. Candidly, the courts care very little about why the parents decided to separate. They do however, look very close at which parent is putting the Children's best interests first. You should not disrespect or talk negative about the other parent to or in front of your children. This will hurt you in your custody case and worse still it will hurt your children. Even if you normally have good self-control these emotional types of situations can happen in a flash. It only takes one dumb move done out of anger, like pushing the other parent who is holding the baby at the time to lose custody. Once Custody is lost, you may never recover it. Also remember that anything you say, write down or put in electronic form on the internet may be used against you. Always assume your words and a judge will see written statements. Child custody cases are very emotional and when parent tensions run high and these emotions can lead to ugly verbal confrontations at the very least and actual physical violence at the very worst. You may make rash decisions that can harm your case or narrow your options in your case. Avoid these at all cost and in these situations just walk away. Letting your emotions get the best of you can cost you time, money and create everlasting damage to your children. http://www.youtube.com/jolietfamilylaw For more info visit: http://www.breslanlaw.com/joliet-family-law-attorneys-lawyers/
Views: 82582 jolietfamilylaw
Section 5: Positive Aspects of Shared Parenting
 
02:03
Custody arrangements made through a court often include plans for holidays. As co-parents, you should aim to be flexible and fair with holiday scheduling. For example, some children would prefer to spend one-half day with each parent rather than only see one parent on a holiday. Other children and parents find this too fragmented, so they alternate attending holiday events. One of the first steps to successful co-parenting during holidays is to take care of your emotions. Some newly divorced people consider holidays or special events an exciting opportunity to celebrate in a new, more meaningful way; but many parents and children experience lots of strong emotions at these times. Anger, jealousy, shame, guilt, or fear may surface or be repressed and trigger depression or anxiety. This can steer you off course from your best co-parenting plans. To help yourself and your kids, take some time to share those feelings with a trusted individual. Talking to a friend or a professional can release some of the tensions and make the holiday time more positive.
Views: 1193 parent4ever
What are some common arrangements for child visitation in Florida?
 
00:54
What are some common arrangements for child visitation in Florida? | Law Office of Thomas P. Gill Jr. P.L. | http://www.gilllawoffice.com/ | (813) 654-0514 | 137 South Parsons Avenue, Brandon, Florida 33511 In Florida, the courts will generally approve any timesharing arrangement worked out between the parties and reduced to a marital settlement agreement and parenting plan. The court would like to see in a parenting plan substantial timesharing for both parents. Florida prefers that each parent share in both the joys and the burdens of raising their children. An example of a timesharing plan would be an equal timesharing plan where each parent has 50% of the time. Parents can break it up a week on, a week off or they can do something like one parent gets every Monday and Tuesday night, the other parent gets every Wednesday and Thursday night, and they rotate the weekends. Over a two week period this gives each parent seven days of timesharing.
Moving Out of State in a Child Custody Case
 
06:10
http://commandthecourtroom.com Some things one will need to present to a judge if one is thinking about relocations in a child custody case.* Please read the Disclaimer below: *This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with a licensed attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case. I've been getting a lot of questions from people who have the issue of relocation in their child custody case. Either they want to move out of state, city, town, country with their child or they are the parent who do not want their child to move out of state, city, etc. There are many cases when a parent a wants to be able to relocate the child and many times the other parent is fighting against the other parent relocating the child. Step 1: You always start with the best interest factors. So wherever you are located go to your States statutes and the child custody factors also known as the best interest factors for your state. I talk about the best interest factors in a lot of my videos. If you want to download a free list of the child best interest factors go to my website http://commandthecourtroom.com and you can get a checklist of all of the best interest factors that the judge will look at. You have to be prepared to show in court how those best interest factors apply in your relocation case. But what is different about relocation cases is that there are other factors above the Best interest factors that you have to address with the judge. I am going to read to you some examples of questions that the judge is going to want answers to before he or she decides your relocation case. These may vary depending on what State you live in but this will be good start for you. You have to talk to the judge about the potential advantages of the move and how you think it will improve the quality of life for the child. You have to talk about your motivation in asking that the court allow you to relocate with your child. And if you are the parent who is opposing the relocation of the child you have to show the judge what your motivation is in your opposition. One thing you will need to show is what is the parenting time going to look like if this relocation is granted. Is the parent whose child is moving away going to be able to have parenting time and what is it going to look like. What is the transportation cost going to be for the parent who is going to have to travel to see the child? How is that cost going to be split and is it even going to be feasible for the other parent who will have to travel to see the child. The judge will look at the impact that the move will make on the childs quality of life. The mental and physical toll it might take, what does the child actually want. What are the living conditions going to be? The judge will also look at the strength of the ties the child has currently with their school, friends, activ For example if I have a client who wants to move their children I will ask them to get information about the children's new school, the rating of the school, how far is the school going to be from where that parent is living. I want to know what type of salary the parent is going to be making in the new location. So these are the type of questions that I am going to be asking and what the judge will want to know. Wendy Hernandez is founder of Command the Courtroom and a family law attorney practicing in Phoenix, AZ. Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Law Firm Website: http://www.hernandezfirm.com
Views: 11102 Command the Courtroom
Win Child Custody Hearing - New Easy, Simple, Fast Method Challenge temporary orders
 
59:28
Why wait for a final hearing in family court to get your children back? Why wait on a counselor's report or psych evals or family studies? WWW.FIXFAMILYCOURTS.COM -- VISIT the site for updated strategies. We have pre-trial motion samples now that you can use to learn how to use your rights before you go to trial. Want to discuss what might work for you, contact us at www.fixfamilycourts.com/contactus Are you stuck in temporary orders, being told you have to have family studies or wait for another expert to present a report to the family court before you can have your equal time and rights back to your child? Sherry and Ron B Palmer have done it again and found another gold nugget that could be the key to no longer being trapped in family court limbo. There is hope that you might not have to live in peril. Sherry and Ron B Palmer share with you the #1 simplest, most powerful way to fight temporary orders, service plans, studies, psych evals and whatever else they try to burden you with and keep you from your children. You will leave with knowing how to argue that the trial court does not have proper authority to order psych evals, family studies, home studies, parenting facilitators, GALs or anyone else with the purpose to impose their idea of what is best for your child, and unequal time with your children. We’ve seen many people try to argue jurisdiction unsuccessfully. We have cracked a simpler argument that leads to basically the same result. And what about child support and alimony? Is this being imposed properly? Visit www.fixfamilycourts.com/membership website and FIND OUT WHAT ELSE SHERRY AND RON B PALMER HAVE DISCOVERED AND HAVE WAITING FOR YOU to help you Win your child custody fight. Join us and you will walk away with knowing how to protect your right to the care, custody, and control of your child and your pocketbook even if you live far away from your child. You will leave this webinar with the most simple way to argue that: 1. The care, custody, and control of your child is not determined by distance, by arguing which parent is better, or by experts. 2. The court is improperly ordering psych evals, home studies, GALs, child support, and alimony/spousal support. 3. The best interest of the child standard has to presume you decide what is best first or else it is being used in an unconstitutional manner - and violating due process. 4. How to get the fastest and most inexpensive relief when the other parent wants to take away your rights and time and money. 5. How to end delays and get things moving again. We have developed multiple simplified ways to fight these infringements on your rights, privacy, and liberties. Every attorney that has seen them knows the power behind them. AFTER YOU WATCH THIS VIDEO go to our website and Join the community at www.fixfamilycourts.com/membership to receive more tools to help you save money and time. (It doesn’t have to be so complicated anymore. You don’t have to suffer from information overload either where everyone is telling you something different. And you don’t have to wonder what to do next or what to decide. It doesn’t have to be so overwhelming. Or worry about why you can’t find an attorney that can do this for you.) Once you have simplified ways to protect yourself, they won’t be able to take advantage of you again, unless you let them. They can fight you on them and you might have to appeal the trial court, but the last appeal that won using these arguments on appeal went through the appellate court and up to their State Supreme Court within 1 year. Total time it took to get an opinion was only 1 year and seven months. How many years have you been fighting? And how many years will you keep fighting? How long will you keep following those carrots? These arguments work! This case is proof that they work.* Go to www.fixfamilycourts.com/membership TO FIND YOUR WAY OFF THE HAMSTER WHEEL Authors of “Not in the Child’s Best Interest” (Book on parental rights and children’s rights) Authors of “Protecting Parent-Child Bonds: 28th Amendment” (Book includes guide for legislators) Twitter: https://twitter.com/fixfamilycourts (@fixfamilycourts) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Fix-Family-Courts/324146134354536 *Of course, every case is different and we can never guarantee that you will get the same success as anyone else. We are not responsible for your results. Whatever information you use from us you use at your own risk. Disclaimer: I am NOT an attorney or a lawyer, do NOT practice law in any federal or State court system. Any information provided by me to you, regardless of how specific, is NOT intended to be legal advice under any state or federal law. This information is subject to change and not warranted to be accurate or up-to-date. The information provided in this video is not a substitute for the advice of an attorney. You should consult an attorney regarding your rights under the law.
Views: 116442 Sherry Palmer
Pay Attention to Your Child's Behavior | Parenting Plans | Child's Best Interest
 
04:30
http://commandthecourtroom.com If you have a parenting time agreement you need to play close attention to your child's behavior & whether your parenting plan is in the best interest of your child. Paying attention to his or her behaviors and deciding whether or not there's something that you need to do differently or you need to work with the other parent on. You need to make sure that your child is above all happy. When you're in the middle of a custody case it really is all about the children. I've talked about in many of my videos how everything that the judge is going to consider points to what's best for the child. I'm raising this issue because I just got out of court and in this particular case it really should be an easy case result. But it hasn't been unfortunately because from my perspective the father is really angry and bitter and he's trying to control the mother. So at a prior court hearing the parties agreed that when the other parent was having parenting time with the child that the parent who was not having parenting time was going to have a phone call a day with the child. It was actually the father who requested these phone calls. The mother consented and she said no problem. Let's set the phone calls between this time and this time. Each of the parties can talk as long as the child wants to talk. What ended up happening is that the child doesn't really want to talk much to father on the phone and I guess that's upsetting to the father and it's upsetting to the child. So now the father has changed his position and he's decided that he doesn't want the phone calls to happen. So he has asked the mother to stop the phone calls. So when the child's with one parent the other parent would not get any contact with the child. In talking to mother I told her that this was a situation where the parties had made a parenting agreement and she had every right to insist on him following this agreed upon arrangement if that's what she wanted to do. She agreed but said I would love to talk to our child when he's with Dad but this is what I'm observing when the child's with me. When it's time for the phone call with Dad and Dad calls the child might be involved in playing with his siblings and his cousins and he's having a fabulous time and that's what children should be doing. The child is totally distracted. He has the phone call with the father and then he comes back and he's crying and he's upset. He goes in his room and shuts himself in. So she said I really don't think that it’s best for these calls to continue. She said by the same token when I call to have my telephone call while the child is with father, the child is really nervous on the phone. He's worried that I'm mad at him and he's worried that the father's mad at him and she said I just don't think it's good for these calls to continue right now. So I was really surprised and I was pleased at mom's position on this because there's so many people out there who would have insisted and said no I need to have contact with the child because I want to know how they're doing and this is an agreement that they made. But really what mom is looking at just what's going to make the child happiest. She is putting her child first in her custody case. Now Mom doesn't have any concerns about Dads parental fitness or anything like that. And there is a lot of other factors that could come into play in different types of cases. You have to look at those as well but Mom’s head was at and is in the right place because she's looking at what is best for the child and what's making the child happy. As a side note the child is having some problems and mom is hoping that the parties can explore counseling for the child to help him work through these problems. The child is about seven years old so counseling might be appropriate in this situation and by all means look at that if you think it might help in your case. Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com
Views: 1849 Command the Courtroom
Can a Parent Who is Not Seeing Their Child Get Joint Custody?
 
05:04
http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Today I want to talk about whether a parent who is not seeing or spending time with his or her child or children stands a chance of getting joint custody or parenting time. Can this result in one parent getting sole custody of the child? Will it result in a restriction of parenting time allowed for one parent? The answer to that question is it really depends on a number of factors. These factors are called ‘The Best Interest of the Child Factors”. If you haven’t already download my ‘Best Interest Factors Checklist’ by going to: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Whatever State you are in you should research your child custody statutes. And in those child custody laws there is going to be a list of factors that the court is going to consider in making a decision about custody and or parenting time. Again, this list is commonly referred to as ‘The Best Interest of the Child Factors” And not ONE factor controls, in other words the judge usually looks at the Interplay between a bunch of different factors. Not one factor is going to outweigh all of the other factors. So the fact that a parent is not spending time with the child is not the only thing the judge is going to look at regarding whether the parents will get equal decision making or equal parenting time with the child. Now another thing I pose to you is you really have to look at the reason the parent is not spending time with the child or that there is no communication with the child. Some examples for instance: Is the other parent is getting in the way and impeding that relationship or refusing visitation? Are there indications of parental alienation by one of the parents? If that is the case then I think that is not a very good thing for the parent who is getting in the way of the relationship and essentially preventing the other parent from spending time with his or her child or children. At least in Arizona child custody laws one of our best interest factors is Which parent is more likely to promote a frequent, meaningful and continuous relationship with the other parent. If one of the parents is not doing that then I would say that is a strike against that parent. Now not all states may list that as a best interest factor in their custody laws and statutes, it is still something you can and should bring up to the judge during your custody hearing. You can tell the judge, yes judge I have not been seeing my child because he or she, the other parent hasn’t been letting me. The second thing to consider is if the other parent is letting you see your child or children and you already have been awarded parenting time but you are NOT seeing the child then why not? You should be exercising all the parenting time that you allowed to see with your child that is possible. If you are exercising less than the court has ordered then I would say that will be a problem for you. IWendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com
Views: 14695 Command the Courtroom
Parenting Plan Template
 
03:26
Parenting Plan Template http://www.parentingwithgrace.com/hfvq This is a parenting plan that every parent should consider. Usually when we hear the term "parenting plan" we think of visitation and shared custody. While a parenting plan is a necessity in those situations, it is not the only place a plan is needed. This parenting plan has some key elements that help us in situations. Plans should be individualized and tailored to our children's needs, our culture, and should address any given situations. The goal and focus of a plan is to guide and coach our to make better choices to make the correct decisions. Download a free eBook that will help with discovering a more effective to discipline. http://www.parentingwithgrace.com/hfvq
Winning a Child Custody Relocation Case is Very Difficult
 
05:06
http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Relocation cases are some of the most difficult cases that judges have to decide in a child custody case.* Please read the disclaimer below: *This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with a licensed attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case. Judges have told me in these type of cases there is a clear winner and a clear loser. If the judge rules that the child can relocate with a parent then that parent 'wins' and the other parent loses and vice versa. The burden of proof is on the person seeking to have the children relocate with them. That means that they have to prove to the judge that relocating the child is in the child's best interest. Depending on where you live there is a list of factors, on top of the normal 'Child's Best Interest Factors' that the judge needs to look at to decide whether relocation is in the child's best interest. So where ever you live, you need to do relocation research and find out what the relocation laws are in your state. You need to know each and every factor the judge is going to look at because you have to adjust each and every one of them. In your relocation hearing , If a parent wants to relocate then the judge is going to want to know whether there is still going to be the opportunity for the parent who's left behind to have a substantial and continuing relationship with the children, especially if the parent who is being left behind has had a lot of involvement and bonding relationship with the kids. The fact is, if you are moving your child out of state, the child will be thousands if not more miles away then that relationship, once the child moves, will never be the same. That parent will no longer have the ongoing or weekly visitation that they had before. The parent for example won't be able to attend parent/teacher conferences, be involved in their child's extra-curricular activities. It is really going to affect the level of that parent's participation in their child's lives. If you're the parent seeking to relocate with the children you are going to have to show the judge how that quality of relationship that the other parent shares with the children can continue. I will say that in a lot of my relocation cases where I am representing the parent that is wanting to move with the children, I encourage them to tell the other parent that they can have every single break, that they can have all or most of the summer...all the times that the children are not in school, they can have. In a lot of cases, that does increase the chances for the parent that wants to relocate, however in some cases, it has not made a difference. The reason is because the parent who wants to move has not proven to the judge's satisfaction that moving is in the best interest of the child. If you are the parent wanting to relocate it is not impossible. I've had a lot of judges grant the relocation in spit of the other parent's objections. You just have to really do your research in your state for the factors the judge is going to be looking at. Get your evidence ready and your ducks in a row and be ready to present it. If you are the parent who is opposing the relocation of your child, same advice for you. Look at the relocation factors in your state or jurisdiction. You will need to spin those in a way that the judge will have no choice but to find that relocation is not in the best interest of the children. Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com Please read the disclaimer below: This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with a licensed attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case.
Views: 7158 Command the Courtroom
Creating Parenting Plans for Custody Cases Webinar
 
51:30
In this webinar hosted by the University of Miami Division of Continuing and International Education and facilitator Margaret Pickard, an overview of parenting plans for child custody cases will be given. Families involved in high conflict custody cases require artfully drafted Parenting Plans to successfully manage the families’ future and, more importantly, protect the emotional well-being of their children. In order to successfully manage high conflict cases, a detailed Parenting Plan must be crafted for the parties, to provide guidelines for parental decision making, timeshares, and daily management of custodial issues. In this Weinar, the most common “hot buttons” for parents in conflict will be addressed, including, but not limited to: •Effective Timeshare Schedules; •Neutral Exchange Locations; •Exchange Guidelines; •Guidelines for Phone Calls Between Homes; •Use and Abuse of Technology (e.g., text messaging, parental controls and access to children’s technology); •Teenage Discretion and Loyalty Binds; •Right of First Refusal and War Zones; •Creating Effective Holiday Schedules; and, •Priority Dates for Vacation Plans.
Views: 561 UMDCIE
Developing a Parenting Plan: Part 1 - Sumner County, Tennessee
 
03:32
Developing a Parenting Plan: Part 1 November 4, 2015 by Jay Ingrum Phillips-Ingrum-Headshots-5_finalDeveloping a Parenting Plan: Part 1 of a 4 Part Series Custody: PRP vs. ARP and Joint Custody The primary residential parent (PRP) is the parent with whom the child resides more than fifty percent of the time. The alternate residential parent (ARP) is the parent with whom the child resides less than fifty percent of the time. Joint custody can mean a variety of things to different people. However, when I think of true, joint custody, I think of a 50/50 split of parenting time. By this I mean one week with the mother and one week with the father. Generally, I do not recommend true, joint, 50/50 custody arrangements unless the parties get along extremely well and live very close to one another. Oftentimes, this is not the case. After all, if the parties got along well, then they probably would not be getting divorced. A 50/50 split of parenting time can be very hard on the children. It can be too much back and forth. Children tend to do better knowing this is my home, this is my room, this is where my things are, and these are the rules and the routine that I will follow the majority of the time. It is hard to foster such a routine and continuity when children are going back and forth every week like a “tennis ball in a tennis match.” Visitation: Days with Mother vs. Days with Father Parents should set a visitation schedule that is in the best interest of the children first and foremost. Parents should consider where they each live, their work schedules, the children’s school schedules, and the children’s extracurricular activities. Parents must also understand that the number of days they each receive with the child(ren) will be one factor in determining the amount of child support that one will pay and the other will receive. This should not be the primary consideration in setting a visitation schedule, but it must be a factor in each parent’s decision making process on this issue. Holidays and Your Family Traditions When parents are looking at setting holiday visitation for each parent with the children I always advise them to think of the children first, but to also consider each side of the family’s holiday traditions. I strongly believe that each parent should try to honor each side of the family’s holiday traditions. For example, if the mother’s family opens Christmas presents on Christmas Eve every year, and the father’s side of the family opens Christmas presents on Christmas morning, then the parents should set the children’s Christmas visitation schedule accordingly. However, if both sides of the family have the exact same traditions, then the holiday visitation should alternate in even and odd years. Fall, Winter/Christmas, Spring, & Summer Breaks All of the major breaks from school for the children should be handled in the same way, and that is to alternate them in even and odd years, unless one parent is off work and the other parent is not. Again, the parents should try to work well with one another for the benefit of the children. Temporary and Permanent Parenting Plans are really about the children, not the parents. Be sure to check back next week for Part 2. Also, our office will be posting corresponding videos that mirror this information, but that will include additional information. We hope you find all of this information helpful to you during a difficult time. Phillips & Ingrum Attorneys at Law 117 East Main Street Gallatin, TN 37066 615-452-8030 www.phillipsandingrum.com www.facebook.com/phillipsandingrum The attorneys at Phillips & Ingrum have been serving the Gallatin, Sumner County, Tenn., community for more than 30 years. Our team is well-trained to handle a variety of legal cases on your behalf. Though we focus primarily on civil, criminal and family law, we proudly serve clients in numerous practice areas. http://phillipsandingrum.com/our-work/
Views: 147 Phillips & Ingrum
How to Get Kids to Listen
 
04:51
Why is it so hard for so many parents and teachers to get kids to do as they are told? Because too many adults have followed some very bad advice. Family psychologist John Rosemond offers some useful tips on how to get the little barbarians to listen. Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2ylo1Yt Have you taken the pledge for school choice? Click here! https://www.schoolchoicenow.com Joining PragerU is free! Sign up now to get all our videos as soon as they're released. http://prageru.com/signup Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/29SgPaX JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2c8vsff Script: When was the last time you heard a child referred to as obedient? It’s probably been a while. That’s too bad because the best research tells us that obedient children are happy children. And, from my experience as a family psychologist, the parents of obedient children are happy parents. Since all parents want their children to be happy, the question becomes: How does one get a child to obey? Is there some trick to it? Well, there are certainly are a lot of parents who think so. They believe that proper discipline is a matter of using the right methods, techniques, and strategies: what I call consequence delivery systems. Parents have been using these behavior-modification-based methods since they became popular in the 1960s – seemingly to no avail. Would anyone argue that today’s kids are more obedient than kids were several generations ago? I don’t think so. The reason these methods and techniques don’t work is that proper discipline is not a matter of proper methods. It’s a matter of a proper attitude on the part of the parent. Let me illustrate the point. Let’s say that for a week I observe the classroom of a grade school teacher who has the reputation of being the best disciplinarian in her district. She consistently has fewer behavior problems than any of her colleagues. What is she doing? She’s making her expectations perfectly clear. Which means, first, she communicates in simple, declarative sentences. She doesn’t use fifty words when she could use ten. The more words you use to communicate your expectations, the less confident you sound. Second, she prefaces her instructions to her students with authoritative phrases like “I want you to…” and “It’s time for you to…” She says, “It’s time for you to take out your math books and turn to page 25” as opposed to “Let’s take out our math books and turn to page 25. Okay?” Third, this teacher does not explain the motives behind her instructions to her students. Why? Because she knows that explanations invite arguments. Whenever parents tell me they’re dealing with an argumentative child I know that these well-intentioned people are explaining themselves. They tell their child why they want him to pick up his toys, for example. And he argues, because you can always pick apart an explanation. If you don’t explain yourself when you give an instruction to a child, then the child, being a child, is almost surely going to ask for one. He’s going to ask Why? or Why not? At which point… get ready for a big surprise… your answer should be “Because I said so.” For the complete script, visit https://www.prageru.com/videos/how-get-kids-listen
Views: 1291384 PragerU
How To Be A Great Parent in 6 Easy Steps
 
04:08
I've summarized my nearly 4 years of expert parenting into 6 easy steps. Write these steps down: 1. Listen 2. Don't Share Your Plans 3. Your Job (is this even a step? I don't know) 4. Lead By Example 5. Wipes for EVERYTHING 6. Applaud Their Creativity Subscribe to watch New Father Chronicles Every Wed! https://www.youtube.com/laguardiacross/UCZoaoWgTo61BNTquePdHGuQ?sub_confirmation=1 We got shirts! http://laguardiacross.com/shop Follow us: http://facebook.com/iamlaguardiacross http://twitter.com/laguardiacross http://instagram.com/laguardiacross For business inquiries: karen@karenmariemason.com My name's La Guardia Cross. I make music, art, film, and I co-created 2 baby girls with my wife, Leah. New Father Chronicles began in November of 2014 when my daughter Amalah was 1-week-old. I had no idea what I was doing, so I decided to chronicle my journey on YouTube and make fun of myself along the way. Our 2nd daughter, Nayely, was born in April of 2017. My channel is filled with the silly adventures I have with my girls, infant and toddler interviews, my interpretations of their babble, silly skits, and the things I've learned or unlearned as a parent. Sometimes Leah and I mix it up a bit and share some pretty personal moments as well. Why? Well, we're far from perfect and we've learned a lot from our mistakes.
Views: 179431 La Guardia Cross
Parenting Orders by Aussie Divorce , Alan Weiss
 
01:55
Parents who have separated or divorced, as well as parents who have never been married, can ask a Family Law Court for a parenting order. The most common questions addressed by parenting orders are: • Where will the children live? • How much time will the children spend with each parent? • How will important decisions about the children be made, including where they will go to school and whether they should have elective medical treatment? Australian law presumes that parents should share responsibility for raising a child if they are able to do so. The law also presumes that each parent should have as much time with a child as possible, consistent with the other parent’s rights. When judges make a parenting order, they consider the circumstances so they can fashion an order that is practical. They also consider whether there is a need to protect the child or a parent from family violence. The court is always required to make an order that is in the best interests of the child. That same principle should guide parents as they negotiate parenting issues. If you need advice about parenting orders, you should consult a lawyer. Only a lawyer can give you legal advice. https://www.aussiedivorce.com.au/family-law/parenting-orders/
Taking Baby Steps When Fathers Are Not Getting  Equal Parenting Time
 
03:23
http://commandthecourtroom.com Often times, and it is usually fathers, tell me that they are not getting equal parenting time with their children. They want equal time with their children and to have as much time with their children as the mother has. In many cases the father may not be getting any time at all or sometimes just minimal time. Fathers should have equal parenting rights unless the court has determined that they are unfit. It’s almost always my philosophy to try to work things out outside the court. In cases where the other party is adamant that they will not agree to equal parenting time, I often talk to my client, usually the father usually about considering taking less time as the case is proceeding to get to where he wants to be eventually. Because in my mind some time is better than no time I've been in the position where I get to trial and both parties have dug their heels in and for example my client the father has not wanted to accept any time. He just wanted to maintain his position and say she's done denying me time. But we get to trial and mothers saying the father hasn't had any time with the children so I want a graduated parenting schedule. This graduation would last over several months before they get to equal parenting time. That doesn't serve my client especially if my client is fit and it also doesn't serve the children. What my hope is in advising my client to accept less while the case is proceeding to get that graduated parenting time started, so by the time you get to the end of the case and if you end up in trial, you can tell the judge we've already had this period where father and the children are getting more used to each other. They’re increasing their bond or seen each other more often there's no need for additional graduated parenting time. At the time of trial if you’ve had some time with the child as opposed to no time you're in a better position to tell the judge let's get right to where we want to go. Especially if you're a father or a mother who's fighting for equal time, if you're not getting what you wanted the case is proceeding it doesn't mean that you can't end up where you want to be at the end of the case. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ☎️You may Contact Wendy Hernandez at 602-230-2333 or visit http://www.hernandezfirm.com Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com
Choose the Evidence You Use at Your Child Custody Trial Wisely
 
04:53
http://commandthecourtroom.com When selecting the evidence to show at your custody trial be sure that it actually shows what you want it to show and not something else. I've said it more than once in some of my past videos that if there's any evidence that you think that you might possibly want to use at trial, that you disclose it in advance and in accordance with the laws of your jurisdiction. That way if you decide you want to use certain pieces of it as evidence you actually have the option to use it. You don't have to use all of the evidence that you disclose. But when you're getting ready for trial and you're deciding what evidence that you're going to actually try to admit, I want to encourage you to be really careful about the evidence that you pick. Be careful that the evidence actually shows what you want it to show. I want to give you an example from a trial that I just had last week. In this particular case I was representing the Father. Mother took him back to court because she was wanting to reduce his parenting time from almost equal to every other weekend. Mother submitted a whole bunch of calendars which she said evidenced the fact that Father wasn't exercising the time that he had. In response to that, my client and his mother put together their own calendars and their own documentation showing that he had exercised time with the child and this documentation actually included text messages between the mother of the child and my client and between the mother of the child and my client’s mother. Now the little girl had spent a lot of time with my client’s mother, the paternal Grandmother, because after the divorce both Dad and Mom were trying to get on their feet. But Mother was not admitting this so we disclosed his evidence and I was planning to admit it at trial. But because Mother was the petitioning party, the judge put her case on first and much to my surprise she actually admitted the evidence that we had disclosed. The evidence that showed my client’s documentation contradicting hers and which showed text is between the Mother and my client as well as the Mother and the paternal grandmother. I wasn't really sure why Mother and her attorney chose to admit this evidence but I was kind of happy because I didn't have to lay the foundation and use my time admitting it. So the judge came back with a really quick ruling on this particular case and he pretty much hammered Mother. He told Mother you're not getting what you want and the evidence shows that basically you know there's been a real lack of parenting in this case by both parents. The little girl had spent a lot of time with the paternal Grandmother and this was evidence by the exhibit that Mother admitted which was actually the exhibit that or the evidence that we disclosed in advance. The exhibit consisted of all of those text messages and calendars. The judge spent three to four pages quoting from various text message exchanges between Mother and paternal grandmother about the little girls first day of school and the fact that Mother wasn't present for that. He spoke about the little girl's fifth birthday party and the fact that the Mother wasn't present for that and lots of other things that Mother wasn't present for. So what it looked like to the judge was that Mother was really the tea pot calling the kettle black. Mother was the one who was saying that Dad’s time should be reduced because he was not spending time with their daughter. In fact the evidence admitted by Mother herself showed that she was guilty of exactly what she was accusing my client of doing. Her petition was denied and my client is thrilled that his time hasn't been reduced with his daughter. Mother's plan whatever it was backfired on her. So let that be a lesson to me and I hope that you let it be a lesson to you that when selecting your evidence be sure that it actually shows what you want it to show and not something else so that's going do your case harm. Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com
Views: 11861 Command the Courtroom
Creating a Parenting Plan with Custody X Change
 
02:48
You can easily create the perfect agreement for your situation using Custody X Changes' parenting plan feature. Find out more at http://www.custodyxchange.com
Views: 320 custodyxchange
Relocating Across Town Can Impact Your Parenting Rights
 
05:38
http://commandthecourtroom.com Moving from one part of the city or town to the next CAN have an impact on your child & your custody rights.* Please read the disclaimer below: *This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with a licensed attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case. Local relocation is when one parent is moving from one part of a city or town to another where the distance is for example 45 minutes or an hour away from the other parent. 'Relocation' normally will be used when you are talking about one parent moving either to another city or another state, or . These local relocation cases can really have an impact on a parent's time that they are able to exercise and also on the children. This is a case I am working with now. A few years ago two parties went through a custody proceeding and at the time they were living pretty close to each other, about 10 to 15 mins away from each other. That is a nice distance when parents are sharing children in common. Fast forward a few years later and the mother decided that she wanted to move, so she moved about 45 minutes away from where the father lived. These parents had been sharing equal parenting time where one parent who get the child one week and then the other parent the next week. So what this meant was that the child had to enroll in a new school, one that was close to her mother's new home. The result is that when the child is now with the father, the children are spending a ton of time in the car on the way to and from school and cutting down the quality time that they now share with Dad. In my mind, it is not fair for the mother to move the child without notice to the father in this case. But more importantly, that's not fair to the kids. It's not fun for an adult much less a child to spend hours sitting in rush hour traffic at the beginning of the day and at the end of the day. Plus, they have homework to do and baths to take, get ready for bed, etc. It remains to be seen what will happen in that case, but I had a similar case where the father moved significant distance away and the parents had been sharing equal decision making and parenting time, and the judge said, 'You know what? You moved away so you're not getting equal time anymore. So the father could then only get the kids on the weekend, because the judge would not have the child's day to day lives disrupted. What the judge did was what was in the best interest of the child. So, before you decide to relocate 'locally' think about how the move might affect the lives of your children and how it could, in the long run, negatively affect your parenting time and decision making rights depending on your judge. Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com Please read the disclaimer below: This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with a licensed attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case.
Views: 1822 Command the Courtroom
What is "time-sharing"?
 
00:35
Florida Family law attorney discusses the new terminology for "custody".
The Risk of NOT Settling a Child Custody Case Out of Court
 
06:12
http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Some people choose to settle their child custody & divorce case out of court.* Please read the disclaimer below: *This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with a licensed attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case. There can be consequences in taking your case to the judge instead of settling your differences outside of court. When you go before a judge in custody or divorce court, the judge alone is going to decide your case and it will be based on limited facts in a limited period of time. Judges are also handling thousands of cases every year and they hear these things every day. Also, they are a stranger and do not know you or your children. Having a judge decide your case will always run the risk of you not getting the best outcome that you could have had, had you tried to settle the issues outside of court. With that being said, there are issues that are too complicated or that really can't be settled out of court and you have no choice but to go to trail. But if there is a way to settle some of the issues if not all of the issues then I strongly encourage you to try. As an example I recently was in mediation on a divorce case where there was nearly every issue in the book: child custody, parenting time, division of debt, property, a business, real estate. And I guarantee had they taking these issues before a judge they would have both walked away from the trial with decisions that made them less than happy. When people settle they will also have things that they are not happy with but it is better if you're invested and had a role in that result. In this case everyone was in agreement that my client who is a stay at home Mom to 3 children deserved spousal maintenance. They also agreed that there was a significant amount of debt. And in Arizona the law says the debt that was acquired during the marriage is divided equitiably and in most cases that means equally. So my client who is a stay at home Mom who doesn't have a lot of experience in the workplace, if she went to trial is going to walk away with $50,000 in debt. So both sides put their heads together and the other side agreed that my client would have a hard time paying the debt off. And they also agreed that my client was entitle to a few years of spousal maintenance. So what was agreed upon was the husband was willing to take on 3/4 of the debt in exchange for the wife getting a less amount of spousal maintenance of the course of the next few years. So that was a real attractive proposal for my client because she doesn't know how she would pay $50,000 in debt after the divorce is final. She has a minimum wage job and she needs to have a job that is flexible since she is raising 3 children on her own. So we went a step further and proposed that instead of the husband paying spousal maintenance to my client over a couple of years, say for $1,000 per month that maybe he give her a lump sum up front. Like $20,000 up front instead of $24,000 over the next 2 years. So that would decrease her debt load and she could go into the world as a divorced woman where her finances would be something she could manage. The other side has not decided yet whether to accept our proposal, but the husband really seemed really interested in paying a lump sum in exchange for taking on more of the debt. So that was a creative result that we would not have gotten had we gone to trial. So get creative, do research on the internet and make a proposal that works best for your children. The sky is the limit when you are settling outside of court. Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com Please read the disclaimer below: This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with a licensed attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case.
Views: 5021 Command the Courtroom
A Conference Call in Real Life
 
04:15
Updated and remastered a little bit. Check Out Upside.com/trippandtyler WE CAN HELP YOUR COMPANY MAKE LESS BORING VIDEOS: http://bit.ly/2gCiL9r SUBSCRIBE to Tripp and Tyler: http://bit.ly/19gTRke Want exclusive content (unreleased videos, etc)? http://eepurl.com/lqSmf Want to use this video at a meeting or event: http://trippandtyler.tv/licensing OUR PODCAST: http://apple.co/1VDQz54 Our other Internet websites: Facebook: http://facebook.com/trippandtyler Twitter: http://twitter.com/trippandtyler Our book! http://trippandtylerbook.com Created by Tripp and Tyler Produced by Green Tricycle Studios Cast: Tripp Crosby Beth PIlgreen Tyler Stanton Jon Raffa Paul Ryden David Robertson Written by Tyler Stanton, Tripp Crosby Directed by Tripp Crosby Camera: David Robertson Sound: Sam White Editor: Sam White Color Correction: David Robertson Sound Mix: David Robertson
Views: 1109286 Tripp and Tyler
Can You Withhold Parenting Time if Your Spouse Fails to Pay Child Support?
 
04:35
http://commandthecourtroom.com Today I want to talk with you about the relationship between parenting time and child support and if one can affect the other.* Please read the Disclaimer below: *This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with an attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case. In my family law practice a lot of people come to me, especially those who are entitled to receive child support. They want to know if they are entitled to withhold parenting time from the other parent due to non-payment of child support. My inclination is to say No, because that is not in the child's best interest. Parenting time and child support are two separate issues. Just like if a parent is obligated by a court order to pay child support...if there is then is a court order in effect that says a parent is entitled to a certain amount of parenting time, then they are entitled to get it. The parent may not be happy because they are not getting child support, but they still must give the other parent the parenting time according their agreement. Because if they don't, they could face the same consequences that the parent who is failing to pay child support faces. So, there are ways to get a parent to pay child support if they are not doing it, other than withholding parenting time. The main way is to file an enforcement action in whatever jurisdiction you are in. An enforcement action is where you tell the court, this is the order that is in effect and the person that is obligated to follow that order is not doing so, and I want the court to enforce the order. So that is one tool a person can use if they are not getting child support. (or if they are not getting parenting time for that matter) Another tool a parent can use which is more serious is 'filing a petition in order to show cause regarding contempt of court'. In my mind contempt of court is more serious because when someone is facing a contempt of court charge, incarceration is one of the potential sanctions that they can get. Let's face it. Nobody wants to be put in jail because they are not following a court order. But if I really want to hammer someone who has not been paying child support for years for example or is tens of thousands of dollars behind on child support, then that is what I might file. I had a young father come to me recently and he was just devastated because his ex is using the children as a tool. She's trying to extort a large amount of child support from him and she's withholding the kids from seeing him. She is telling him that he cannot see the kids unless and until you pay me this amount of money per month. And the poor guy was kind of inclined to do it because he is desperate to see his kids because it has been a long time since he has been able to do so. My advice to him is you should not give in to threats my the mother. There are ways to go through the court process and get the result that is in the best interest of the kid. If both parents are fit and it is in the kid's best interest, then they should be seeing both Mom and Dad. So whether you are the Mom or the Dad, and you are not getting the parenting time or you are not getting the child support, use the tools that are available to you. Wendy Hernandez is a family law attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of Command the Courtroom which teaches you how to handle yourself in court and achieve the best outcome when representing yourself in your divorce or child custody case. Download my FREE ‘Child’s Best Interest Checklist’ at http://www.commandthecourtroom.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom Web: http://www.commandthecourtroom.com My Law Firm: http://www.hernandezfirm.com
Views: 1495 Command the Courtroom
Ways to Avoid Making the Judge Angry in a Family Law Case
 
07:45
http://commandthecourtroom.com These are some ways that could keep a judge in a family law case from getting angry at a party. Please read the Disclaimer below: *This video recording is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as the rendering of legal advice. The viewing of this recording does not create an attorney-client relationship. An attorney-client relationship is only formed when you have signed an engagement agreement. We cannot guarantee results. Past results do not guarantee future results. Consult with a licensed attorney for information regarding the specifics of your case. The main thing you can do this is to be reasonable in what you are asking for. Deciding what is reasonable is, I know, sometimes hard to gauge because this is your life, this is your children, etc. When you're really biased it's hard to see the other side it's hard to see the other side as being reasonable but to the best of your ability when you're going through a case when it comes to whatever request that you're making or whatever position you're taking I think that you should always put your self in the position of the judge. The judge is ultimately is the most important person in your case. I recently had a couple of different cases where a judge thought that my clients positions are unreasonable and in one case my client didn't see where his position was unreasonable and the judge actually punished him pretty severely. In one case we had a temporary orders hearing and it was like in November of 2015 and as a result of the temporary orders hearing our judge ordered my client to be responsible for paying the car payment on the family vehicle as well as the car insurance on the family vehicle until the time the final hearing came around. so what happened was soon as we were waiting for the final hearing the car tags came due on the family vehicle and my client wanted his soon then soon-to-be ex-wife to pay half the tags she didn't have a job she wasn't working she didn't have full-time access to a vehicle because they were sharing one vehicle and he worked full time so she that she pay for half the tags. So ultimately my clients decided not to pay for the tags even though he had been ordered to pay for all other expenses related to that vehicle. The judge got really upset with him at the final trial because he didn't pay for the registration on that car and he was the one that was earning the money and he had the means to do so and the judge punished him in and this the fact that he didn't pay for the tags came up at least three times in the final minute entry in the judge really let my client have it in other areas. The judge thought the tags were a big thing in this case she brought it up over and over and over again that he was unreasonable his conduct of not just simply paying for the tags was unreasonable by the way she also said that the wife's conduct of not responding to my clients request to pay the tags was also unreasonable. So that's one example of of how things can go really bad if in the judges eyes you're being unreasonable The worst part in that case is however that my client has been ordered to pay a portion of the now ex-wife's attorneys fees and costs and is due in part to judges perception of my clients and reasonableness. Get Free Access to my Child's Best Interest Checklist now! http://www.commandthecourtroom.com If you are going through a custody battle, please download this free checklist and ensure that you have a nearly exhaustive list of factors you should consider presenting during your custody trial. Wendy Hernandez is a Family Law Attorney in Phoenix, AZ and founder of CommandTheCourtroom.com which offers guidance on how to successfully represent yourself in your divorce or custody case. Law Firm Website: http://www.hernandezfirm.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/commandthecourtroom
Views: 54961 Command the Courtroom
Birthday Party Ideas for Minimalists (10 Tips for a Meaningful Celebration)
 
16:21
Birthday Party Ideas for Minimalists (10 Tips for a Meaningful Celebration) The Parenting Junkie shares birthday party ideas! Birthday party ideas for minimalists can be tough. You want to celebrate, but without the materialism! Minimalist kids birthday party are possible! Want to know how to plan a minimalist birthday party? How about retro birthday party games? Need stress-free toddler birthday ideas and inspiration? We’re even discussing non-toy gifts for kids, like Fiver birthday party, experience gift ideas instead of toys, toonie birthday party, and diy birthday gifts. Simple birthday parties and simple birthday games can be easy! DIY party theme ideas make party planning a breeze! Birthday celebration ideas for kids with less stuff means less stress! Minimalism with kids can be done, even with birthdays! Stress free birthdays can happen! ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE(!) MEANINGFUL BIRTHDAY GUIDE HERE: (http://www.theparentingjunkie.com/birthday-guide) SUBSCRIBE TO THIS CHANNEL (https://www.youtube.com/user/theparentingjunkie?sub_confirmation=1) JOIN OUR JUDGEMENT FREE COMMUNITY (https://www.facebook.com/groups/loveparentingwithavital/) MORE VIDEOS YOU’LL LOVE Minimalism with Kids - House Tour (https://youtu.be/a1RS_soKaJc) Minimalist Newborn Essentials You Don’t Need (https://youtu.be/l-jAwGnHQjM) Minimalism & Toys - the only 10 toys you “need” (https://youtu.be/YTYcWpPW2mk) 10 Toys to Get Rid Of Now (https://youtu.be/hSM1RFTDvW0) Day in My Life - homeschooling life with 3 littles (https://youtu.be/x2NBxw5cXkc) Big Room Declutter - 7 Reasons Why We Have Too Much (https://youtu.be/mmHghjR_6O0) *** AS SEEN IN THIS VIDEO The Gathering [book] (https://amzn.to/2Ntzikc) *** TWEET THIS VIDEO: Say HI! on social media: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/parentingjunkie/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theparentingjunkie Twitter: https://twitter.com/parentingjunkie ***Product links provided here may or may not be affiliate links. This makes no purchase difference to you, but will help support The Parenting Junkie’s work. Thank you. #parentingjunkie #minimalismwithkids #minimalistbirthday
Views: 3863 The Parenting Junkie
Bike Lanes by Casey Neistat
 
03:04
follow me on snapchat - caseyneistat check out my second channel - https://www.youtube.com/snapstories on http://instagram.com/caseyneistat on https://www.facebook.com/cneistat on https://twitter.com/CaseyNeistat
Views: 21377917 CaseyNeistat
14 Ways To Tell If Someone is Suicidal
 
06:35
Suicide is a very sad but very real situation for many people around the world. Here is a list of potential signs to look for if you think someone you know may be considering suicide. How to tell if someone or a friend or family member is suicidal is another way of saving a life. **Do note that one of these signs alone does not mean someone is suicidal. Usually, it's a combination of these signs.** If you are feeling depressed or contemplating suicide please remember that you are not alone. If you’re looking for affordable and convenient therapy to deal with stress, anxiety, or depression, please check out our sponsor BetterHelp: https://hasofferstracking.betterhelp.com/aff_c?offer_id=2&aff_id=364 Suicide Hotlines: America: 1-800-273-TALK (8255) Canada: 1-866-531-2600 Australia: 13 11 14 United Kingdom: +44 (0) 8457 90 90 90 Beijing: 0800-810-1117 Hong Kong: +852 28 960 000 Japan/Tokyo: 81 (0) 3 5286 9090 Brazil: 55 11 31514109 or (91) 3223-0074 Mexico: 9453777 Germany: 0800 111 0 111 Russia: (495) 625 3101 India: 91-22-27546669 Iran: 1480 South Africa: 0800 12 13 14 This is only a short list of a few countries, however there is always somebody to reach out to. Also we are aware number 10 is repeated twice, it was too late to change it once the issue was realized. Apologies. Article: http://www.psych2go.net/signs-of-suicide/ Script Writer 1: Elliot F. Voice Over & Post scripting: https://www.youtube.com/user/DesigningDonna Animation by: Emma Schrederis https://vimeo.com/e94 More Psych2Go here: http://youtube.com/psych2go Website: http://psych2go.net Twitter: http://twitter.com/psych2go Facebook: http://facebook.com/psych2go Tumblr: http://psych2go.me For licensing inquiries, contact psych2go@outlook.com
Views: 4445300 Psych2Go
Addressing Parenting Time in Child Support Orders
 
57:56
In recent years, the Office of Child Support Enforcement has supported several pilot programs aimed at establishing concurrent child support and parenting time orders. This webinar will first give a brief summary of important considerations regarding the prevalence of domestic violence survivors in the child support system, screening practices, and the relationship between parenting time, child support payment, and child well-being. Next, colleagues from the Texas Council on Family Violence will describe promising practices pertaining to the state child support system establishment of parenting time orders. They will share how collaborative efforts with the Texas Child Support Division have made the system safer for survivors of domestic violence. Because Texas is one of the few states with a longstanding mandate under state law to address parenting time in the child support process, our presenters can give a unique perspective on the potential and pitfalls for families experiencing domestic violence. Presenters: Krista Del Gallo, Policy Manager, Texas Council on Family Violence, Mona Muro, Policy Coordinator, Texas Council on Family Violence, and Lorie Sicafuse, PhD, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges
Views: 119 NCJFCJ
Red Flags for Identifying Child Predators- Pregnancy & Parenting- ModernMom
 
03:22
Expert Patty Fitzgerald discusses how to spot a child predator. Click below to subscribe to our channel for more great videos! A few red flags for child predators include anyone intent on spending one-on-one time with your child, anyone who lavishes your child with excessive compliments and anyone who offers more help than usual for no compensation. Beware of these child predator warning signs with information from a child safety educator in this video on keeping your kids safe. ModernMom is an online community designed for the woman behind the mom, where mothers of all kinds can share experiences and learn from other women around the world. A comprehensive guide and community, ModernMom.com features smart and practical advice on topics such as parenting, finances, career, health, wellness, beauty, entertainment and more. With one click, women can also access a worldwide network of moms who are ready to chat, ask questions and share their most clever tips and advice on our active message boards. ModernMom's two CEOs are Brooke Burke and Lisa Rosenblatt. Subscribe to ModernMom.com TV - http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=modernmom ModernMom.com TV - http://www.youtube.com/modernmom ModernMom Website: http://www.modernmom.com ModernMom on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/ModernMom/197177430011 ModernMom on Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/ModernMom ModernMom on Google+: http://plus.google.com/106528258549530074974/posts
Views: 17055 ModernMom
Stressors of Parenting on Marriage & How to Deal with Them - Podcast 59
 
43:43
Parenting comes with it’s own set of stressors that can really put a strain on your marriage. But parenting doesn’t have to damage your relationship with your spouse! Today on the podcast Nils Smith, Christina Dodson, and Dr. Kim talk about the stressors of parenting and how to deal with them in a healthy way. They share real life examples and practical advice on how to parent together in a way that brings life to your marriage. Tune in to learn more about how to deal with the stressors of parenting!
Views: 144 awesomemarriage
How to Create an Effective Action Plan | Brian Tracy
 
07:38
Everyone has goals, but some people seem to be more successful than others in achieving them. That’s because people who accomplish goals at a higher rate are those who have developed a personal action plan. In this video, I'll share my best strategic planning skills so that you can create your own action plan. http://bit.ly/2tJ0q4Y Goal setting and achievement can be a difficult process, but with the right action plan anything is possible! Click the link above if you want to gain clarity on exactly what you want to achieve in every area of your life in just 14 days. “Your problem is to bridge the gap between where you are now and the goals you intend to reach.” @BrianTracy (Click to tweet: http://ctt.ec/8hv42) ___________________ Learn more: Subscribe to my channel for free offers, tips and more! YouTube: http://ow.ly/ScHSb Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/BrianTracyPage Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/BrianTracy Google+: +BrianTracyOfficialPage Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/BrianTracy Instagram: @TheBrianTracy Blog: http://bit.ly/1rc4hlg personal action plan, time management, how to plan, planning, plan your day, setting goals, goal-setting, planning tips, daily planning,
Views: 471014 Brian Tracy
Subscriber makes my wife cry.| asCEDbyme
 
10:05
Thank you guys so much for all that you say and do for us! I'm going to make these videos more visually pleasing next time. It's important to us that we show you guys we read all of your mail you guys send us. Much love! SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS. Ced Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/ascedbyme/ Ced Snapchat - ascedbyme Ced Twitter - https://twitter.com/ascedbyme Charlotte's Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/ca.pt/ IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO SUBMIT AN INTRO VIDEO OR A TESTIMONIAL THURSDAY HERE ARE ALL THE GUIDELINES. Send to me Email: Ced@ascedbyme.com INTRO VIDEO GUIDELINES. Example: Hey, My name is John, I’m from ________________ and you're watching asCEDbyme. Example for intro to the Vlogs. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUiqk4ahiMA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nLudz... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X76si... Try to keep the video under 10 seconds! This is meant to be short. (You can be as creative as you want! Always try new things ... group of friends, singing, throwing a ball .. anything!) TESTIMONIAL THURSDAY GUIDELINES. Testimony Thursday: Time limit - 90-120 seconds. Can be more than one person (example; husband and wife, mother-daughter, father-son etc.) No Swearing Try to give as much context as you can. Cite a bible verse that relates to your testimony. WHEN YOU SUBMIT YOUR VIDEOS MAKE SURE YOU PUT IN THE SUBJECT WHAT IT IS YOUR SENDING: EITHER ASCEDBYME INTRO OR TESTIMONY THURSDAY ——— Editing Software: Adobe Premiere Pro CC - 2017 EQUIPMENT. CAMERAS: SONY RX100 M5 https://www.sony.com/electronics/cyber-shot-compact-cameras/dsc-rx100m5 SONY A6500 https://www.sony.com/electronics/interchangeable-lens-cameras/ilce-6500-body-kit Lenses: Soon 10-18 mm F4 http://www.bestbuy.com/site/sony-10-18mm-f-4-wide-angle-zoom-lens-for-most-nex-e-mount-cameras-black/1687411.p?skuId=1687411 Sony 35mm F 1.8 http://www.bestbuy.com/site/sony-35mm-f-1-8-prime-lens-for-most-nex-e-mount-cameras-black/1687281.p?skuId=1687281 DRONE: https://www.amazon.com/DJI-Phantom-Professional-Quadcopter-CP-PT-000549/dp/B01N639RIJ Music By: https://soundcloud.com/flayvors/flavors-dusk-beat-tape
Views: 147001 asCEDbyme
How to Write the Perfect Essay
 
09:12
***FREE download of one of my successful Harvard essays: https://ivyadvise.com/p/welcome Writing the perfect essay is like drawing the perfect circle. Meaning that no matter what you do you'll always end up with a zero? No, meaning it's impossible, but with the right tools, you can get pretty darn close. You guys requested it, so I thought I'd share some of my best tips and tricks for writing essays. I've been writing essays for almost two decades now, so this video is a long one. Strap yourself in and get ready, 'cause this is about to be a ride. Also, the first essay format I give you comes from my French education on writing essays (i.e. start with a question, develop your ideas, answer the question, open essay up to new question). The second essay format I give you comes from my American education on writing essays (i.e. state a thesis, argue your thesis, restate your thesis). I'm partial to the French way of writing essays, because I think it makes more sense for life (i.e. you have a question you want to answer, you try to answer it, when you do you move on...). However, the American way of writing essays can be helpful for trying to argue a point. Write the way that you think will best suit you in your given circumstance! More Info on American Academic Essay Formatting: http://www.bucks.edu/media/bcccmedialibrary/pdf/FiveParagraphEssayOutlineJuly08_000.pdf Link to Successful Harvard Application Essay: https://youtu.be/S-b6rl7bl90 Outline for My Harvard Essay: Paragraph 1 - **Introduces question: Am I an oxymoron? **Introduces context: I am a product of my environment (unsaid: I am about to explain my environment). Paragraph 2 - **Develops idea of life as a contradiction: Contrast siblings' age with mine, contrast exposure to maturity with childish enthusiasm. Paragraph 3 - **Develops idea of life as a contradiction: The gap between the contrasts seems to close as I get older, but a different gap emerges--that between my normal school life and my art classes. Paragraph 4 - **Develops idea of life as a contradiction: Art class is my exploration of another side of life. Paragraph 5 - **Develops idea of life as a contradiction: This "other side of life" has inspired me create simply for my own pleasure. This mindset has seeped into other areas of my life. Paragraph 6 - **Develops idea of life as a contradiction: A dream of mine is to create a charter school--this dream stemmed from my exposure to academic life. Seemingly unrelated, art nonetheless has been crucial in helping me understand how to make that dream a reality. Paragraph 7 - **Summarizes essay: "My world consists of math books and track meets, it's the wonders of a painting class and the parenting of siblings..." **Answers question: Some might think my life is an oxymoron, I call it balanced. Woo almost finished! But because I'm a YouTuber and these words are ingrained in my DNA--don't forget to LIKE, COMMENT, and SUBSCRIBE. Support me: https://www.patreon.com/yesreneau Video Gear Used for This Video: **Camera - Canon t5i http://amzn.to/2dld16N ** Lens - Sigma 30mm f/1.4 http://amzn.to/2e3ccyx **Microphone - Rode VideoMic Pro http://amzn.to/2dld1Ur **Tripod - Manfrotto Compact http://amzn.to/2eeUG9O Music - "La, La, La" by Otis McDonald Stalk me - Twitter: https://twitter.com/yesreneau Tumblr: https://yesreneau.tumblr.com Insta: https://www.instagram.com/yesreneau/
Views: 349227 YesReneau