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Nursing Care Plan Tutorial | How to Complete a Care Plan in Nursing School
 
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Developing a nursing care plan: This nursing care plan tutorial has a free sample care plan resource that you can use to help develop your care plans for nursing school. (see link below). Nursing care plans are often a big part of nursing school, and nurses do use care plans on the job. This video tutorial (lecture) will explain how to complete a nursing care plan. Here is a video on how to complete a nursing care plan with the nursing diagnosis, patient goals, nursing interventions, and evaluation. This care plan is for a patient with nausea. Nursing Care Plan Database: http://www.registerednursern.com/nursing/free-care-plans/ Overview of care plans: http://www.registerednursern.com/nursing-care-plans-free-care-plan-examples-for-a-registered-nurses-rn-students/ Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=registerednursern Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-ultimate-list-of-nursing-medical-supplies-and-items-a-new-nurse-student-nurse-needs-to-buy/ Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nursing-career-help/ Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/RegisteredNurseRN/videos Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWtwCDmLHyX2UeHofCIcgo0 "Nursing Skills Videos": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUhd_qQYEbp0Eab3uUKhgKb "Nursing School Study Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWBO40qeDmmaMwMHJEWc9Ms "Nursing School Tips & Questions": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVQok-t1X5ZMGgQr3IMBY9M "Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUkW_DpJekN_Y0lFkVNFyVF "Types of Nursing Specialties": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfW8dRD72gUFa5W7XdfoxArp "Healthcare Salary Information": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVN0vmEP59Tx2bIaB_3Qhdh "New Nurse Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVTqH6LIoAD2zROuzX9GXZy "Nursing Career Help": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVXjptWyvj2sx1k1587B_pj "EKG Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU-A9UTclI0tOYrNJ1N5SNt "Personality Types": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU0qHnOjj2jf4Hw8aJaxbtm "Dosage & Calculations for Nurses": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUYdl0TZQ0Tc2-hLlXlHNXq "Diabetes Health Managment": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXtEx17D7zC1efmWIX-iIs9
Views: 238092 RegisteredNurseRN
Measure Nutrition Now | How important are Measurement Tools?
 
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"Measurement is what everybody is talking about now" says Kathy Spahn, President & CEO of Helen Keller International. According to Michael B. Zimmermann, Head of Laboratory of Human Nutrition ETH Zürich, measurement is important to be able to prove if an intervention works. Are there any other reasons why measurement matters? Together with our partner GAIN we wanted to find out how important measurement tools are. For this purpose we've asked Kathy Spahn, Michael B. Zimmermann and ten more experts and published a video that brings together their different views. Gathered for the Micronutrient Forum in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in June 2014, we've discussed how measuring the extent of micronutrient deficiencies can provide better information for designing high-impact interventions. We have asked the following experts: Marc Van Ameringen, Executive Director, GAIN Prof. Dr. Michael Bruce Zimmermann, Head of Laboratory of Human Nutrition, ETH Zurich Dr. Rolf Klemm, Vice President Nutrition, Helen Keller International Elizabeth Parkes, Cassava Breader, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture Dr. Omar Dary, Health Science Specialist (Nutrition), USAID Dr. Klaus Kraemer, Director, Sight and Life Dr. John Fiedler, Health & Nutrition Economist, International Food Policy Research Institute Dr. Fabian Rohner, President, GroundWork LLC Prof. Dr. Anna Lartey, Director of Nutrition Food and Agriculture Organization United Nations Mary Christine R. Castro, Deputy Executive Director, Nutrition Center of the Philippines Kathy Spahn, President & CEO, Helen Keller International Hazvinei Mugwagwa, Manager North America, Nutrition Improvement Program DSM Web: http://www.bioanalyt.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BioAnalyt LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/bioanalyt
Views: 1832 BioAnalyt
Using evidence to inform nutrition policies - eLENA
 
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Malnutrition in all its forms affects people all over the world. Effective interventions targeting malnutrition exist, however policy makers and programme managers often do not have access to the latest, most relevant information needed to make evidence-informed decisions. The WHO e-Library of Evidence for Nutrition Actions (eLENA) is an online library of evidence-informed guidance for nutrition interventions, providing policy-makers, programme managers and others convenient access to the latest WHO nutrition guidelines, recommendations and related information for a wide variety of nutrition interventions. eLENA can help countries to develop and refine evidence-informed nutrition policies and programmes that target their particular nutrition challenges, and in doing so, help to achieve global nutrition and related health goals. Visit eLENA at http://www.who.int/elena/en/
Nursing Process Overview: ADPIE (Assessment, Diagnosis, Planning, Implementation and Evaluation)
 
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This video provides a a brief overview of the nursing process. It is good for beginners and students preparing for the NCLEX-RN. More videos are available about specific parts of the nursing process in this playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLs4oKIDq23AfdIxE8NvwnhbORnb_dE_RJ Critical Thinking Part 1: Definition, Connection to the Nursing Process, Benefits and Levels. http://youtu.be/GnrPz1AlnW0 Critical Thinking Part 2: Components and Development http://youtu.be/ovu6Q1orjH4 To learn about SMART goals see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k9TuE4--IuY&feature=share&list=UUmjoIHKlxtimgqZEAauWnHw Sample Assessment: http://youtu.be/rssf7Y8xd8A
Views: 153996 NurseKillam
Nursing Care Plan Tutorial
 
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How to construct a nursing care plan using the nursing process.
Views: 322577 ruabadfishtoo
Care planning made easy
 
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Understand what a care plan is and what it is used for and how a care plan is developed. Be able to use the care plan for resident nutritional care.
COPD Nursing Care Plan Tutorial
 
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FREE Nursing School Cheat Sheets at: http://www.nrsng.com/careplantemplate Tired of professors who don't seem to care, confusing lectures, and taking endless NCLEX® review questions? . . . Welcome to NRSNG.com | Where Nurses Learn . . . Prepare to DEMOLISH the NCLEX. Follow Us::::::::::::::::::::::::: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nrsng/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nrsng Twitter: https://twitter.com/nrsngcom Snapchat: @nrsngcom Resources::::::::::::::::::::::: Blog: http://www.NRSNG.com FREE Cheat Sheets: http://www.nrsng.com/freebies Books: http://www.NursingStudentBooks.com Nursing Student Toolbox: http://www.NRSNG.com/toolbox MedMaster Course: http://www.MedMasterCourse.com Visit us at http://www.nrsng.com/medical-information-disclaimer/ for disclaimer information. NCLEX®, NCLEX-RN® are registered trademarks of the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, INC. and hold no affiliation with NRSNG.
Views: 8640 NRSNG
Constructing a Nursing Care Plan, Part 3: Developing Patient Goals
 
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...with Nursing Professor Lori Cerone. Capital Community College, Hartford, CT
Views: 18320 SeeItNow @ CCC
How to Write SOAP Format for Mental Health Counselors
 
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CLICK HERE ►► http://www.soapnoteexample.com/ In this brief presentation on SOAP Note Format we will: Discuss the difference between Subjective and Objective data Show concrete examples of subjective and objective data Help you gain confidence using SOAP format SOAP is a very popular format MH therapists use to document important details from the clients session. Subjective data is what the client: States, reports, complains of, describes etc. this is the clients viewpoint. Examples of subjective data the clinician would record are: The client stated he is feeling much less depressed than when he began counseling The client reports she feels nauseas after taking her depression medication The client complained of feeling unmotivated to look for a job The client described having a loud argument with her husband and shared this often happens when they have been drinking alcohol. Client described feeling anxious and scared this morning while driving to therapy Take away tip: subjective data has to do with what the client shares, reports, describes or otherwise expresses. It’s not always easy to determine what is subjective and what is objective, one way to look at it is the objective data is the therapist’s observable and measureable and factual contribution. Examples of objective data the clinician would record are: Objective data should focus in on: Mental health and mood status Motivation Behavior Physical health Emotions Level of functioning Personality issues In other words many of the same criteria used in your DSM V diagnosis For example the clinician might write: Client was motivated to accomplish goals as evidenced by completion of homework assignment Client wrung hands throughout session Client was experiencing a headache during the session Client’s emotions were labile – he swung from inappropriate laughing to crying. Take away tip: Remember the Objective data is mainly measurable and observable. The Assessment is where the therapist brings it all together and expresses his thoughts about what is going on with the client, based on the S and the O. Some therapist also use this space to update the DSM diagnosis or to Rule out or rule in a diagnosis. In any case, if there is a formal diagnosis the assessment should certainly tie into the formal diagnosis. If one is using formal DSM diagnoses there must be enough evidence in the client assessment to support the diagnoses. Also, in focusing on the assessment portion of the clinical note will help the therapist to keep track of and record any mental health criteria changes. When writing the assessment it is a good time to ask yourself if the client still meets the diagnostic criteria. Does the data support the diagnosis. The assessment should focus on those criteria that contribute to understanding the problem better and/or reaching an appropriate and accurate diagnosis. For example the clinician might write under assessment: Client continues to experience depression NOS Client has occupational and family stressors Client expressing inappropriate anger Client exceptionally fearful of being abandoned Client test results showed hypothyroidism Take away tip: Remember the Assessment is where you make sense of and assimilate the subjective and objective data. The Plan essentially is the action steps and/or the clinical interventions. It is presumably the plan and clinical interventions that drive treatment forward and encourage the client to meet their goals and objectives. Under the Plan section of the SOAP the therapist might write things like: That both the client and counselor are committed to doing, i.e. the client rescheduled for following week Plus interventions: The client is committed to attending the domestic violence support group Therapist will continue EMDR and biblio-therapy Next session therapist will use guided meditation and assist client in learning relaxation skills. Other interventions such as nutritional, medical or physical fitness interventions and the like that contribute to the clients therapeutic goals and objectives should be noted. Take away tip: Remember the Plan is essentially a record of the action you and your client are committed to taking. In Summary, remember to review SOAP note format tips regularly. The more confidant you are in how to document your sessions, the easier and more enjoyable this part of your job will be. Plus and most importantly the SOAP format will help you to stay focused on what is therapeutically important. For tools and forms to make your job easier go to http://www.soapnoteexample.com/ or http://IntakeForms.net/ or click the link in the description below this video. For more Counseling Forms tips subscribe to my Counseling Forms YouTube Channel
Views: 7777 Counseling Forms
NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT
 
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Views: 357 KRZ0501
Webinar: CHRONIC DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM PLANNING IN PUBLIC HEALTH: WHAT'S THE EVIDENCE
 
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A 90 minute webinar, led by Maureen Dobbins, Scientific Director of Health Evidence, reviews and discusses four chronic disease reviews, including key messages and implications for practice: * Booth, M., O'Brodovich, H., Finegood, D. (2004). Addressing childhood obesity: The evidence for action. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Institute of Nutrition, Metabolism and Diabetes.http://www.healthevidence.org/view-article.aspx?a=20969 * Farmer, A.P., Legare, F., Grimshaw, J., Harvey, E., McGowan, J.L., et al. (2008). Printed educational materials: Effects on professional practice and health care outcomes. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Issue 3, Art. No.: CD004398. http://www.healthevidence.org/view-article.aspx?a=18385 * O'Brien, K., Nixon, S., Tynan, A.M., Glazier, R.H. (2010). Aerobic exercise interventions for adults living with HIV/AIDS. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Issue 8, Art. No.: CD001796. http://www.healthevidence.org/view-article.aspx?a=18467 * Shiell, A., Spilchak, P., Ladhani, N., Hawe, P., Lorenzetti, D. (2008). A systematic review of population health approaches to prevent type II diabetes: Report to the Public Health Agency of Canada. Calgary, AB: Population Health Intervention Research Centre (PHIRC). http://www.healthevidence.org/view-article.aspx?a=20974
Views: 649 Health Evidence
Mainstreaming Nutrition in Agriculture Development Plans
 
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East and Central Africa CAADP Nutrition Programme Development Workshop 25th February - 1st March 2013 in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Views: 220 NEPAD
6 Steps to Effective Program Evaluation Planning
 
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In this 3-minute video, Dr. Bernadette Wright introduces how to plan an effective program evaluation, so you can use the results to improve your program and increase your positive impact.
Medical vs. Nursing Diagnosis and Collaborative Problems: Know the difference and connection
 
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As a nurse it is important to understand the difference between a medical diagnosis, a nursing diagnosis and a collaborative problem. ... A medical diagnosis identifies a specific disease or condition. In the hospital it is commonly simply referred to as the patient’s diagnosis. This diagnosis is made by a physician after they assess the patient’s history, signs and symptoms as well as conduct diagnostic tests as needed. The medical diagnosis will then be treated by the physician. You can check out the link below for more examples and information about specific medical diagnoses including signs, symptoms and diagnostic tests. A nursing diagnosis identifies a client’s response to their health that the nurse can manage. These diagnoses serve as the basis for the next steps in the nursing process which include planning, intervention and evaluation. Nursing diagnoses need to fall within the scope of what nurses are licensed to treat because nurses are accountable for outcomes related to these diagnoses. When the nurse assesses the patient, they use their clinical judgement to identify specific client problems and responses that are identified using standardised language from NANDA International. Using this standardised language is important for communication among nurses. It also has helped to promote research into client issues that were previously underexplored. A nursing diagnosis handbook will come in handy as you work through the process of turning your assessment data into a nursing diagnosis. For a current list of nursing diagnostic labels please see the link below this video. There are quite a few so we will talk more about how to formulate your nursing diagnoses in the next video. In short - A medical diagnosis identifies a disease that the physician treats. A nursing diagnosis identifies an actual or potential response to a disease or situation that the nurse focuses on. For example, a patient admitted with a medical diagnosis of breast cancer may have a nursing diagnosis of disturbed body image among others. The physician would be concerned with treating the medical diagnosis by ordering surgery, chemotherapy or radiation. The nurse would develop a plan with the patient to help them deal with any shame, embarrassment or guilt they are experiencing. The term “collaborative problem” is sometimes used in multiple ways so be sure to clarify what your teacher means if they ask you to identify or discuss a collaborative problem. A nursing diagnosis may have an intervention that requires collaboration. For example, to manage acute pain with medication it first needs to be prescribed. The diagnosis of acute pain is still a nursing diagnosis. Some textbooks define a collaborative problem as an issue that another discipline has identified that requires a nursing intervention. This issue would then be placed on the interdisciplinary care plan. Chances are that if you are asked to write a collaborative problem statement your teacher is referring to an RC diagnosis. Carpenito’s nursing diagnosis handbook shows how to place a diagnostic label on complications that nurses cannot treat independently. Carpenito defines Collaborative problems as potential complications of a client’s condition that a nurse cannot treat independently. They will probably occur with a specific disease, injury or treatment. Just like the name suggests, collaborative problems are treated collaboratively by both physicians and nurses working together, often in collaboration with other health care team members. In your nursing diagnosis handbook they may be listed under associated nursing diagnoses or in a separate section. Nurses work to prevent collaborative problems from developing. When collaborative problems exist nurses have the responsibility to monitor the patient’s status, intervene or get the physician to intervene when necessary and evaluate how effective interventions are. In short - Nurses cannot treat collaborative problems independently. They do however monitor for and attempt to prevent these potential complications. If the nurse can provide the primary treatment for a complication it is a nursing diagnosis. Related Links Videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=flLK28z3rPA&list=PLs4oKIDq23AfdIxE8NvwnhbORnb_dE_RJ Medical Dx: http://www.fpnotebook.com/index.htm List of Nursing Dx: http://www.lifenurses.com/nursing-diagnosis-and-11-gordons-functional-health-patterns/ NANDA website: http://www.nanda.org/ Recommended Handbook: Carpenito or Ackley Research eBook on Amazon: http://amzn.to/1hB2eBd Selected References Carpenito, J. (2013). Nursing Diagnosis: Application to Clinical Practice. Philadelphia: Lippincott. Doenges, M. E., & Moorhouse, M. F. (2008). Application of nursing process and nursing diagnosis. Philadelphia: Davis. Potter, P. A., & Perry, A. G. (2014). Canadian fundamentals of nursing (5th ed.). Toronto: Elsevier.
Views: 19915 NurseKillam
"Enteral Nutrition" by Nancy Braudis, RN for OPENPediatrics
 
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Please visit: www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu Please note: OPENPediatrics does not support nor control any related videos in the sidebar, these are placed by Youtube. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause. Enteral Nutrition, by Nancy Braudis. My name is Nancy Braudis, and I am a clinical nurse specialist in the Cardiac ICU at Children's Hospital Boston. The topic today is enteral nutrition in infants and children with congenital heart disease. The objectives of this presentation are to understand the importance of early enteral nutrition, identify the risks associated with enteral nutrition, and to reduce barriers to providing optimal nutrition in infants and children with congenital heart disease. Importance of Nutrition. Providing enteral nutrition is important because of the high risk of growth failure in infants and children with complex congenital heart disease. Many infants with congenital heart disease have lower birth weights-- especially those with Tetralogy of Fallot, complete atrioventricular canal, ventricular septal defects, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Providing important nutrients will help to optimize growth and development, improve tissue healing, and reduce the risk of infection. The high rate of growth failure that develops in infants may be related to inadequate nutritional intake-- infants require more calories than they are able to take in. Reduced gastrointestinal absorption-- the body is unable to absorb the nutrients that are required for adequate growth. High energy expenditure-- infants with congenital heart disease are thought to have an increased metabolic rate because of the increased workload on the cardiac and respiratory systems. Physical growth is the most important parameter in the assessment of nutritional status. Periodic assessments should be made to determine if weight, height, length, and head circumference are within normal limits for age. Children who are hospitalized should have daily assessments of weight and monthly assessments of height or length to determine the effectiveness of a feeding plan. Nutritional Goals. Infants with complex congenital heart disease require approximately 120 to 150 calories per kilogram per day to achieve significant growth. In studies evaluating nutritional intake, it was found that most patients only receive 50% to 70% of their actual caloric requirements. Standard guidelines identify a target weight gain for infants of 10 to 35 grams per day. Calorie counts are done to determine the daily intake of calories. To calculate calories, take the total volume of formula in 24 hours-- example, 600 milliliters-- and divide by 30 milliliters. Then multiply by the calories per ounce-- example, 20 calories-- and divide by the infant's weight-- example, 5 kilograms. The answer is 80 calories per kilogram per day. A feeding plan should be developed to improve caloric intake. The goal should be 120 to 150 calories per kilogram per day. So either the volume of feedings or the concentration of calories of the feedings should be increased to reach the nutritional goal. Please note, if you do not use ounces at your institution, the equation would instead read-- 600 milliliters in 24 hours. Since there are 30 milliliters in 1 ounce, the formula has 20 calories per 30 milliliters, or 0.67 calories per 1 milliliter.
Views: 332 OPENPediatrics
Welcome to Tom Irving Nutrition | Clinics
 
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The Tom Irving Nutrition Clinic is the face to face arm of Tom Irving Nutrition Ltd. This facet of Tom's consultations/programmes involves classic clinical structure defining your nutritional needs, forming a nutritional diagnosis, implementing a plan and intervention, and guiding you through the process until we reach your goals. Can't get to face to face clinics? Get in touch at www.tomirvingnutrition.co.uk/free-consultation/ and enter your details to work electronically or to attend my Harley Street Clinic in London.
Assessment and Non Pharmacological Interventions
 
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Assessment and Non Pharmacological Interventions
Views: 859 ORGovDHS
Stroke Nursing Care
 
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Nursing School Shouldn't be so DAMN Hard! FREE NCLEX® Courses at: http://www.NRSNGacademy.com Stroke nursing care and assessment for nursing students. This video covers how to assess and care for a stroke patient for nurses and nursing students. Learn the difference between ischemic and haemorrhagic strokes and how management of these patients differs. Tired of professors who don't seem to care, confusing lectures, and taking endless NCLEX® review questions? . . . Welcome to NRSNG.com | Where Nurses Learn . . . Prepare to DEMOLISH the NCLEX. Blog: http://www.NRSNG.com Apps: http://www.RNcrush.com | http://www.Simclex.com Books: http://www.NursingStudentBooks.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NRSNG Visit us at http://www.nrsng.com/medical-information-disclaimer/ for disclaimer information. NCLEX®, NCLEX-RN® are registered trademarks of the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, INC. and hold no affiliation with NRSNG.
Views: 38568 NRSNG
Brain Foods for Brain Health
 
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Dr. Liz Applegate’s presentation discusses specific foods and dietary supplements that may enhance brain health and transform diet to one that supports healthy aging and memory performance. Dr. Applegate is Director of Sports Nutrition and a Distinguished Lecturer at the University of California, Davis. Her educational focus is eating for optimal health and performance. She writes a column for Runner’s World, appears on national TV & radio and speaks to people of all ages about practical and science based approaches to optimizing oneself through diet. This lecture is part of UC Davis Health System’s Alzheimer’s Disease Center 2016 Community Lecture Series sponsored by Sunrise Senior Living and Aegis Living. It was delivered live at the Lesher Center for the Arts in Walnut Creek, California on November 29, 2016. Learn more about UC Davis Health System’s Alzheimer’s Disease Center here: http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/alzheimers/
Views: 62551 UC Davis Health
NSW Strategic Plan for Children and Young People
 
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The safety, welfare and wellbeing of children and young people are important to the New South Wales Government, which is why, in a national first, they passed legislation to set up the office of the Advocate for Children and Young People and included provisions to develop, in consultation with the Minister responsible for youth, John Ajaka, a three-year whole-of-government Strategic Plan for Children and Young People. This kick-started an elaborate and collaborative process, where Andrew Johnson, the newly appointed Advocate for Children and Young People, listened to more than 4,000 children and young people from diverse backgrounds and life experiences from all corners of New South Wales, so that they themselves set the themes and directions of the Plan. In collaboration with local and state government departments, including an Interdepartmental Advisory Group, non-government organisations and civil society who work with, by and on behalf of children and young people on a daily basis, a large cross-section of New South Wales was able to be included in the development of the Plan. The Plan integrates with the Premier’s Priorities and enact its goals of tackling childhood obesity, improving education results, reducing youth homelessness, creating jobs, improving service levels in hospitals, reducing domestic violence and improving government services, to name a few. All of this collaborative work led the Plan to be focused on six key areas. They are; safe, connect, respect, opportunity, wellbeing and voice. The objective of “Safe” is that children and young people are free from abuse, neglect, violence and serious injury. Like all six themes of the Plan, “Safe” outlines what government is doing and will do, and five indicators to measure success. The objective of “Connect” is that children and young people have a sense of belonging and connectedness with people and place on and offline. The objective of “Respect” is that children and young people are treated with respect, demonstrated by supporting and valuing their strengths, diversity and potential. The objective of “Opportunity” is that children and young people have relevant skills for life, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs and entrepreneurship. The objective of “Wellbeing” is that children and young people are healthy and well through the provision of affordable, accessible and timely services. The final theme is “Voice”. The objective of “Voice” is that children and young people are empowered to be involved in the decisions that affect them. The guiding principles will help focus the activity that will be subject to Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning. Children and young people survey pools and polling will be set up so that the Plan’s progress can be discussed and assessed by children and young people themselves. There will be mid-Plan and end of Plan reports, regular regional meetings, forums and conferences, plus guides and checklists to support the learning and collation of research. Findings will be used to create best practice examples to assist and engage with children and young people. All of this is only a fragment of what’s contained in the full Plan. Read it to learn more about how we can all play our role in enabling children and young people to be safe, be connected, be respected, have access to opportunities, better wellbeing, and have a voice. We have listened, we have heard, now we are responsible. That’s the Plan. www.acyp.nsw.gov.au
Views: 3140 acypNSW
Diabetes Mellitus Pathophysiology & Nursing | Diabetes Nursing Lecture NCLEX | Type 1 & Type 2
 
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Diabetes mellitus pathophysiology and nursing nclex lecture review on diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2. Diabetes mellitus is where a patient has insufficient amounts of insulin to use the blood glucose in the body. Therefore, the patient will experience extreme hyperglycemica. In this lecture, I highlight the key players in diabetes mellitus, causes, different types of diabetes (type 1, type 2, and gestational), complications, and nursing assessment of the diabetic patient. Diabetes Mellitus Quiz: http://www.registerednursern.com/diabetes-mellitus-nclex-quiz/ Part 2 Video on Pharm & Nsg. Management: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bK82X1KrCgg Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/diabetes-mellitus-lecture-nclex-review-notes/ Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=registerednursern Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-ultimate-list-of-nursing-medical-supplies-and-items-a-new-nurse-student-nurse-needs-to-buy/ Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nursing-career-help/ Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/RegisteredNurseRN/videos Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWtwCDmLHyX2UeHofCIcgo0 "Fluid & Electrolytes Made So Easy": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWJSZ9pL8L3Q1dzdlxUzeKv "Nursing Skills Videos": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUhd_qQYEbp0Eab3uUKhgKb "Nursing School Study Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWBO40qeDmmaMwMHJEWc9Ms "Nursing School Tips & Questions": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVQok-t1X5ZMGgQr3IMBY9M "Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUkW_DpJekN_Y0lFkVNFyVF "Types of Nursing Specialties": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfW8dRD72gUFa5W7XdfoxArp "Healthcare Salary Information": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVN0vmEP59Tx2bIaB_3Qhdh "New Nurse Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVTqH6LIoAD2zROuzX9GXZy "Nursing Career Help": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVXjptWyvj2sx1k1587B_pj "EKG Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU-A9UTclI0tOYrNJ1N5SNt "Personality Types": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU0qHnOjj2jf4Hw8aJaxbtm "Dosage & Calculations for Nurses": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUYdl0TZQ0Tc2-hLlXlHNXq "Diabetes Health Managment": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXtEx17D7zC1efmWIX-iIs9
Views: 291224 RegisteredNurseRN
Nutrition & Aging | Aging Matters | NPT Reports
 
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Of the diseases that can affect how we age, malnutrition is not an obvious one. However, researchers say more and more older adults are malnourished, including people who may look healthy or who may even be overweight. The documentary "Nutrition and Aging" examines the hidden epidemic of malnutrition and undernutrition among older adults in the United States. National reports consistently show that Tennessee is among the worst states when it comes to percentage of adults age 60 and older who face the threat of hunger or lack access to quality food, what is known as “food insecurity.” Aging presents other challenges to maintaining a balanced diet, including changes to how bodies process foods and nutrients, how our digestive system works, and how foods taste. Some older people develop difficulty swallowing; others are not able to shop for or prepare meals, while others find the cost of groceries to be a deterrent. The result of these numerous factors is that one in four older adults has some form of malnutrition. Learn more at: https://goo.gl/6iNMfV
Views: 551 NPT Reports
Weight Watcher Triggers
 
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Describes items in the Weight Watchers assessment that trigger Focus Statements, Goals and Interventions in the care plan for weight loss or gain.
Views: 132 Chuck Moody
SMART Goals are not Smart: They Don't Increase Physical Activity
 
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We’ve all heard goal setting is an important component for success. We’ve been told to set goals that are both short and long term, ones that focus on behaviour and outcomes, and most commonly, that they should be SMART. The problem is, so many of these ideas are just dead wrong. McEwan and colleagues did a meta-analysis of all the physical activity interventions that focused on goal setting. They found 52 interventions and compared the different types of goals in the different studies to see which ones had the biggest effect sizes. McEwan and colleagues found no significant difference between goals that were specific and those that were vague. Goals don’t have to be specific and measureable: vague goals work just as well for people who are starting to be more active, and relative goals are better than any benchmarks or guidelines. Collaborating on a goal didn’t make it more likely that the person was going to achieve it. There was no significant difference between goals set by the client, the health professional, or following a discussion between the two. In fact, effect sizes were the smallest for collaborative goals, and largest for those set by the client. This means if the client comes with some outlandish goal that might be hard for them to achieve, it’s better to let them have it and then revisit it after a while, rather than working with them to lower the bar. Goals that were revised on a weekly or fortnightly basis were more likely to promote adherence than those which were revised either daily or not at all. This doesn’t mean you need to collaborate on setting goals. Instead, it’s just helpful for you to check in every week or so and ask if the clients want to revise what they set as their goal. As another testament to this, McEwan and colleagues found the effect of goal-setting was amplified by the use of some complementary behaviour change techniques, or BCTs. What didn’t seem to work was rewards. Some people think rewards might help people focus on the goal, but comparisons that included rewards generally led to lower effect sizes than similar comparisons without rewards. Instead, it seems to help to give clients clear strategies for making progress. Creating action plans can be a very helpful method for helping to bridge the gap between a goal and the current behaviour. In this meta-analysis, providing a set of strategies increased the effect sizes by around 18% (from .498 to .588). When using these strategies together, you have what’s called the “high-performance cycle” by Latham and Locke (1991). People set goals, get strategies for improvement, track their performance, get feedback on how they’re going. We’ve come a long way from the SMART acronym and so far it’s not looking good. The final part to discuss is the T for time-bound, remembering the example from the World Health organisation of 150 minutes per week. Weekly goes like this one did not increase people’s physical activity by themselves. If I was told to do my exercises three times a week, it doesn’t seem to influence my adherence Instead daily goals led to improved physical activity, particularly in combination with weekly goals. Daily goals by themselves have an effect size of .60, and with weekly goals this rises to .947, both of which are significant.
PES Nursing Diagnoses: Problem, Etiology & Symptoms including “secondary to” “unknown” and “complex”
 
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Many books use the PES format to talk about the possible parts of a Nursing Diagnosis. PES stands for Problem, Etiology and Symptoms. In this video I define each of these components as well as show you how to add in other components that are used in three and four part nursing diagnoses. The Problem should be identified using a NANDA label whenever possible. The “problem” is what the client needs, which with some types of nursing diagnoses may not be problem focused. Sometimes the NANDA label will be general and ask you to add a more specific description of the problem to this section. Remember to include qualifiers to the general diagnostic concept as appropriate. Be careful when writing your problem statement that judgmental language is not included. The problem statement should sound neutral to avoid offending clients or influencing treatment decisions. The Problem and Etiology are connected by the phrase “Related to”, which is typically abbreviated as r/t. This phrase is always used because it does not imply a direct cause and effect relationship. Nursing diagnoses are worded this way to leave open the possibility that there may be factors contributing to the problem that have not yet been identified. The Etiology identifies the factors that are causing the problem. For actual nursing diagnoses the etiology identifies the main contributing factors. With potential diagnoses risk factors are used as the etiology. This etiology should help to individualize care for your client. The Etiology needs to be as specific and precise as possible. Do not write this section vaguely hoping that the symptoms section will explain what is going on with the patient. Write your Problem and Etiology as specific as possible before adding the signs and symptoms to the end. “Secondary to” is used to make a statement more precise and clarify the etiology. Specify a pathophysiology or disease that is contributing to the problem. Keep in mind that it is not always necessary to use the “secondary to” phrase. You want to keep your diagnoses as clear and concise as possible. If a client has the defining characteristics of a nursing diagnosis but you do not know the cause or contributing factors you can say there is an “unknown etiology.” In very few cases the etiology may be so complex that you cannot include it in a nursing diagnosis concisely. This situation occurs when there are too many factors causing the problem to state. In these rare circumstances the phrase “complex etiology” may replace the etiology. Symptoms are then listed at the end of your diagnosis following the clause “as manifested by” which is abbreviated. References Ackley, B., & Ladwig, G. B. (2006). Nursing diagnosis handbook: A guide to planning care. St. Louis: Elsevier. Carpenito, J. (2013). Nursing Diagnosis: Application to Clinical Practice. Philadelphia: Lippincott. Doenges, M. E., & Moorhouse, M. F. (2008). Application of nursing process and nursing diagnosis. Philadelphia: Davis. Potter, P. A., & Perry, A. G. (2014). Canadian fundamentals of nursing (5th ed.). Toronto: Elsevier. Wilkinson, J. M. (2007). Nursing Process and Critical Thinking (4th ed.). New Jersey: Pearson. Check out the links below and SUBSCRIBE for more youtube.com/user/NurseKillam Related Videos: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLs4oKIDq23AfdIxE8NvwnhbORnb_dE_RJ Connect with me on Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/youstudynursing https://www.facebook.com/NursesDeservePraise Twitter: @NurseKillam https://twitter.com/NurseKillam Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laura.killam LinkedIn: http://ca.linkedin.com/in/laurakillam
Views: 10012 NurseKillam
Nurse Awesome-Careplan Assessment
 
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Chatting about how to make assessment phase of your careplan easier
Views: 971 Permission ToBe U
The Mwanzo Bora Nutrition Program
 
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The Mwanzo Bora Nutrition Program (MBNP) is implemented by the U.S. non-governmental organization Africare (www.africare.org) at the head of a consortium of local and international partners, and focuses on improved nutrition in the first 1,000 days of the life of a child. Working in partnership with the Government of Tanzania (GoT), the program targets young children under five years old and their parents/caregivers specifically to reduce stunting and anemia. Africare and its consortium partners have managed the MBNP since 2011, with funding from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) through the Feed the Future (FtF) initiative and the Global Health Initiative (GHI). After nearly seven years of working in six regions of the Tanzania Mainland (Dodoma, Iringa, Manyara, Mbeya, Morogoro and Songwe), and in Zanzibar, Africare has invited nutrition stakeholders to learn how the strategies have contributed to a significant reduction in stunting and overall improved nutrition for Tanzanian women and children. “Mwanzo Bora has been a game-changer in so many communities where stunting is a major challenge,” said Cary Alan Johnson, Africare Country Director, “Mwanzo Bora Nutrition Program mothers and babies are healthier, families are raising children with unlimited potential.” At the May 9th event, Africare will present findings from the assessment of the MBNP interventions. The event will include presentations from key government and nutrition partners working in Tanzania. Africare will also show a video highlighting the role of community health volunteers in promoting nutrition in Tanzania. “I never knew a child is supposed to receive only mother’s milk for [the first] 6 months without any additional food or fluids., said Sara Mwambano, a MBNP participant. “The project taught us this, encouraged us to adopt the practice, and to teach others to do the same”. MBNP is aligned with the Government of Tanzania’s National Multi-sectoral Nutrition Action Plan, and USAID’s Multi-sectoral Nutrition and Global Food Security Strategies. A key focus of the MBNP is to promote 17 key health and nutrition behaviors that impact the first 1,000 days of the life of a child using two specially designed virtually facilitated kits: The 1000 Days (Parent) Kit or “Mkoba wa Siku 1000” for optimal nutrition practices in the first 1,000 days of the life of a child, giving caregivers clear and feasible steps to take during each stage of growth. The Dietary Diversity (DD) Kit which promoted supportive behaviors such as joint household decision-making in improved household food production and consumption, hygiene and income generation. The MBNP 1,000 Day SBCC kit (“Mkoba wa Siku 1000”) has been so successful that GoT has adopted it as a national tool to be used to implement nutrition practices and interventions in the country. The GOT is putting in place mechanisms for rolling out the kit in the country with a goal of harmonizing nutrition messaging and behavioral change communication to optimize resources, transparency, and outreach,” said Joyceline Kaganda, former Managing Director of the Tanzania Food and Nutrition Centre.
Views: 26 AfricareMedia
Food as Medicine: Preventing and Treating the Most Common Diseases with Diet
 
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This is Dr. Greger's 2015 live presentation. Dr. Greger has scoured the world's scholarly literature on clinical nutrition and developed this new presentation based on the latest in cutting-edge research exploring the role diet may play in preventing, arresting, and even reversing some of our leading causes of death and disability. Subscribe to Dr. Greger’s free nutrition newsletter at https://www.nutritionfacts.org/subscribe and get a free recipe from his new HOW NOT TO DIE COOKBOOK. (All proceeds Dr. Greger receives from the sales of his books, DVDs, and speaking engagements go to support the 501c3 nonprofit that runs NutritionFacts.org.) Have a question for Dr. Greger about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/food-as-medicine and he'll try to answer it! http://www.NutritionFacts.org • Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NutritionFacts.org • Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nutrition_facts • Podcast: http://nutritionfacts.org/audio/ • Subscribe: http://http://nutritionfacts.org/subscribe/ • Donate: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/donate
Views: 491319 NutritionFacts.org
Carilion Clinic Community Health Needs Assessment
 
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Many and varied organizations are involved in the essential work of improving and maintaining the health of any given community. It is important to assess the health concerns of each community periodically to ensure that current needs are being addressed. A Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA) every few years will uncover issues, indicate where improvement goals are needed, and track and promote progress in key areas, so that there is demonstrated, ongoing improvement. The work of conducting this CHNA and the public availability of its findings is intended to enable health-oriented organizations across the community to plan effectively the vital work of maintaining and improving health. Learn more: https://www.carilionclinic.org/about/chna
Views: 2787 Carilion Clinic
Hemiplegic patient walking after 3 weeks of intensive physiotherapy treatment
 
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Video from Priyanka (Sport's Physio) . In Stroke, Physical Therapy plays an important role in the process of rehabilitation. As a part of the interdisciplinary team, physiotherapistswork in concert with the managing doctor and other rehabilitation specialists to provide stroke patients with a comprehensive rehabilitation program. The stroke physical therapy rehabilitation program involves a dynamic process of assessment, goal-setting, treatment and evaluation; its coverage spans from the acute stage, through the rehabilitation stage, to the community stage. The whole rehabilitation program is predicated on two general components. The first includes preventive measure targeted at maintaining physical integrity and minimizing complications that will prevent or prolong functional return. These measures should begin immediately post stroke and continue as long as necessary. The second component is restorative treatment aimed at promoting functional recovery. This phase should begin as soon as the patient is medically and neurologically stable and has the cognitive and physical ability to participate actively in a rehabilitation program. In brief, the aims of physical therapy interventions are to promote motor recovery, optimize sensory functions, enhance functional independence, and prevent secondary complications. Goals of Physical therapy Management of stroke patients begins as the acute care during acute hospitalization and continues as rehabilitative care as soon as patient’s medical & neurologicalstatus has stabilized. Moreover, community reintegration of patients continues during the community care stage. 1. Acute Care Aims : 1) Prevent recurrent stroke 2) Monitor vital signs, dysphasia adequate nutrition, bladder & bowel function. 3) Prevent complications 4) Mobilize the patient 5) Encourage resumption of self-care activities 6) Provide emotional support & education for patient & family 7)Screen for rehabilitation and choice of settings  2. Rehabilitation care Aims : 1) Set rehabilitation goals; develop rehabilitation plan and monitor progress 2) Manage sensori-motor deficits 3) Improve functional mobility & independence 4) Prevent & treat complications 5) Monitor functional health conditions 6) Discharge planning (safe residence recommendation, patient & care givers education & continuity of care) 7) Community – reintegration  3. Community care Aims : 1) Assist patient to reintegrate into community 2) Enhance family and caregivers functioning 3) Co-ordinate continuity of patient care  4) Promote health and safety and prevent further hospitalization 5) Give advice on community supports, valued activities and vocational reintegrate
Views: 158 Priyanka Das
Case study JLKUhnkeVideo10
 
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Case study analysis with BScN 2nd year. Guides students from analysis of a case study, systems assessment, through formulation and prioritization of nursing diagnosis. Further, it guides students to identify nursing sensitive outcomes (SMART) and to interventions and rationales. Thank you.
Views: 58 Janet Kuhnke
Tim Ferriss: "The 4-Hour Body" | Talks at Google
 
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"Four Hour Body" by Tim Ferriss Thinner, bigger, faster, stronger... which 150 pages will you read? Is it possible to: Reach your genetic potential in 6 months? Sleep 2 hours per day and perform better than on 8 hours? Lose more fat than a marathoner by bingeing? Indeed, and much more. This is not just another diet and fitness book. The 4-Hour Body is the result of an obsessive quest, spanning more than a decade, to hack the human body. It contains the collective wisdom of hundreds of elite athletes, dozens of MDs, and thousands of hours of jaw-dropping personal experimentation. From Olympic training centers to black-market laboratories, from Silicon Valley to South Africa, Tim Ferriss, the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The 4-Hour Workweek, fixated on one life-changing question: For all things physical, what are the tiniest changes that produce the biggest results? Thousands of tests later, this book contains the answers for both men and women. From the gym to the bedroom, it's all here, and it all works. YOU WILL LEARN (in less than 30 minutes each): How to lose those last 5-10 pounds (or 100+ pounds) with odd combinations of food and safe chemical cocktails. * How to prevent fat gain while bingeing (X-mas, holidays, weekends) * How to increase fat-loss 300% with a few bags of ice * How Tim gained 34 pounds of muscle in 28 days, without steroids, and in four hours of total gym time * How to sleep 2 hours per day and feel fully rested * How to produce 15-minute female orgasms * How to triple testosterone and double sperm count * How to go from running 5 kilometers to 50 kilometers in 12 weeks * How to reverse "permanent" injuries * How to add 150+ pounds to your lifts in 6 months * How to pay for a beach vacation with one hospital visit And that's just the tip of the iceberg. There are more than 50 topics covered, all with real-world experiments, many including more than 200 test subjects. You don't need better genetics or more discipline. You need immediate results that compel you to continue. That's exactly what The 4-Hour Body delivers. About the Author TIMOTHY FERRISS, nominated as one of Fast Company's "Most Innovative Business People of 2007," is author of the #1 New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and BusinessWeekbestseller, The 4-Hour Workweek, which has been published in 35 languages. Wired magazine has called Tim "The Superman of Silicon Valley" for his manipulation of the human body. He is a tango world record holder, former national kickboxing champion (Sanshou), guest lecturer at Princeton University, and faculty member at Singularity University, based at NASA Ames Research Center. When not acting as a human guinea pig, Tim enjoys speaking to organizations ranging from Nike to the Harvard School of Public Health.
Views: 287592 Talks at Google
Dr. Gary Donovitz - Interview about Testosterone for Women
 
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Gathering Together Experts to Form a Consensus for the Use of Testosterone in Women Gary Donovitz, M.D. Founder & CEO, BioTE AMMG Interviewer: Derrick DeSilva, Jr., M.D. Meet the new medical paradigm Forget the disease-centered, after-the-fact approach to practicing medicine. Age Management Medicine leads you into a new dimension of healthcare that is clinically, scientifically solid with proactive, preventive protocols that deliver better patient outcomes. Typically practiced within the privatepay sector, Age Management Medicine moves you to the forefront—no more third-party interventions—allowing you to focus on what matters: your patients. What is Age Management Medicine? Age Management Medicine is a proactive, preventive approach focused on preservation of optimum human function and quality of life, making every effort to modulate the process of aging prior to the onset of degenerative aging. The basic tenets of Age Management Medicine are patient evaluation through extensive medical history, lifestyle assessment, physical examination and laboratory evaluation to establish personalized proactive treatment plans consisting of proper diet, exercise, stress management and appropriate medical interventions. About AMMG It is the goal of the Age Management Medicine Group (AMMG) to provide education and information on the specialty of Age Management Medicine to physicians and healthcare professionals through evidence-based, continuing medical education conferences, workshops, seminars, publications and Web media. The Group consists of leading industry healthcare professionals, physicians, practitioners, researchers, medical associations and providers of products and services.
MDS 3.0 Section J, Health Conditions
 
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We would like to hear from you. Please send all comments to MDS30Comments@cms.hhs.gov. Thank you for your time.
Views: 10250 CMSHHSgov
Govt launches maternal, child nutrition plan
 
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The government has launched Multi Sector Nutrition Plan (MSNP) 2013-2017 to improve maternal and child nutrition in Nepal.The National Planning Commission (NPC) launched the MSNP Thursday with an aim of eliminating chronic under nutrition in women and children.
Cultural Psychiatry: Lecture #9 The mental health of indigenous peoples pt 1
 
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Cultural Psychiatry: a Critical Introduction. Lecture 9 The mental health of indigenous peoples pt 1. Dr. Laurence Kirmayer discusses the impacts of colonization on health, and identity, adaptation and the problem of suicide in indigenous populations. Part of the Summer Program in Social and Cultural Psychiatry from the Division of Transcultural Psychiatry.
Interview with Zach Bush, M.D. - Age Management Medicine
 
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Interview with Zach Bush, M.D. Founder & Director, Revolution Health Center, Charlottesville, VA CEO, Biomic Sciences Zach Bush, M.D. is one of the few triple board certified physicians in the country, with specialties of internal medicine, endocrinology and metabolism,and hospice/palliative care. His achievements include award-winning cell biology, clinical care, and medical education. He is the founder and director of Revolution Health Center in Charlottesville, Virginia, and is the CEO of Biomic Sciences - the team that has brought forth the novel science and product line of RestoreTM. Dr. Bush presented The Bacterial Biome and Tight Junction Barriers – Ground Zero of Chronic Inflammation, Disease and Aging Lecture Description: Over the last 10 years there has been an explosion of basic science data that has revealed a link between the intestinal microbiome and systemic disease in the human host. The lack of some species, or the presence of other bacterial species correlates with the occurrence of metabolic diseases, immune dysfunction, and many cancers. This correlation has radically changed the landscape of anti-aging and cancer research, and broadened the potential adjuvant therapies and interventions to prevent and reverse chronic disease in the future. This lecture reveals new insights into direct and indirect mechanisms by which the bacterial biome may mediate systemic disease. The effects of a novel family of redox molecules produced by bacteria have been shown to mediate tight junction barrier systems in the human body, reactive oxygen production from the mitochondria, and balance bacterial flora. What is Age Management Medicine? Age Management Medicine is a proactive, preventive approach focused on preservation of optimum human function and quality of life, making every effort to modulate the process of aging prior to the onset of degenerative aging. The basic tenets of Age Management Medicine are patient evaluation through extensive medical history, lifestyle assessment, physical examination and laboratory evaluation to establish personalized proactive treatment plans consisting of proper diet, exercise, stress management and appropriate medical interventions. About AMMG It is the goal of the Age Management Medicine Group (AMMG) to provide education and information on the specialty of Age Management Medicine to physicians and healthcare professionals through evidence-based, continuing medical education conferences, workshops, seminars, publications and Web media. The Group consists of leading industry healthcare professionals, physicians, practitioners, researchers, medical associations and providers of products and services.
Food based approaches best for overcoming  Micronutrient Deficiency say Experts
 
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Food based approaches best for overcoming Micronutrient Deficiency say Experts According to experts, the best way to overcome micronutrient deficiency is by adopting food based approaches which are essentially food-based interventions that include diet diversity and consuming foods that are nutritionally enhanced. Experts found that significant number of children do not receive the recommended amount of nutrition due to limited awareness and unavailability of food items that are nutrient dense and balanced. Micronutrients includes vitamins( like A,B,C,D) and minerals( like Iron,Zinc ) which are very essential for the overall growth and development of an infant and their deficiency can have long term impact on health. As per a report published in Lancet, food based approaches along with healthy behavioral practices (i.e. hand-washing) could prevent deaths of nearly 2 million children under five and can also reduce the risk of repeated illnesses among them.Experts agree that fortified food/grains (the process of adding vitamins and minerals to food) are among the most effective direct interventions to combat the deficiencies of vitamins and minerals in children which is highly prevalent worldwide. The first step to improve child’s nutrition is taking care of mother’s nutrition during pregnancy.After birth, exclusive breastfeeding till the age of six months is the most effective way to ensure that their nutritional demand is met. However, after an infant is six months old, he can no longer rely solely on breastfeeding and needs other food sources to meet daily nutritional requirements. After 6 months, it is necessary that the complementary food fed to infants is rich in micronutrientslike ragi, navadhanya mix and commercially available fortified cereal foods. Dr. Sreedhar, Consultant Pediatrician, Vertias Children's Clinic, Chennai “As micronutrients cannot be produced by the body, they need to be provided through complementary feeding. Many studies have found positive influence of food based approaches with respect to infant's growth and overall development including IQ. It bridges the existing nutritional gap and adds nutritional diversity in the infant’s diet.” “Infants may fail to reach their full potential and may also become prone to infections due to nutritional deficiency during the age of 6 months to 24 months. Thus, it is highly recommended that adequate intake of vitamins and minerals through complementary feeding is given in this crucial phase.” Dr. Sreedhar. Significant knowledge deficit in majority of population is one of the main reasons that burden of vitamin and mineral malnutrition slowing the growth of children and faltering their overall development. Experts believe that facilitating awareness amongst mothers and caregivers through nutrition education and programs should be on the priority list to combat the scourge of micronutrient deficiency
Views: 87 CHENNAIVIEWS
goal setting 2
 
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FAO  In Depth Capacity Assessment of Bangladesh
 
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Ms. Matia Chowdhury, Minister of Agriculture, Mr. Md. Nojibur Rahman, Secretary of Statistics and Informatics Division, Ministry of Planning, Mr. Mukesh Kumar Srivastava, Senior Statistician, FAO-RAP, and Mr. Mike Robson, FAO Representative In Bangladesh emphasize on the activities relating to the collection of good set of information , downsizing the risks in relation to natural or human made shocks. In depth capacity assessment in Bangladesh is coming to an end, which will largely enable all the stakeholders to identify the scopes of intervention. © FAO: http://www.fao.org
Nurse Awesome- Care Plan Diagnosis
 
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A SUPER simple way to create your nursing statement.
Views: 5565 Permission ToBe U
USANA True Health Assessment | Online Health Assessment | https://reset5day.usana.com
 
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http://youtu.be/mgUJIf5cwDU The USANA True Health Assessment is a personalized web based assessment module designed to make your nutritional regimen as cutting edge as the products. It asks questions pertaining to human health, & you get a Risk Assessment, Lifestyle Plan, and a complete listing of your products ranked from top to bottom, based your health needs and wellness goals. Together, these are designed to get you on, and stay on, your road to optimal health. USANA True Health Assessment is an excellent tool for those who want a do it yourself approach to wellness with some powerful take away information. Information you share with our nutrition and wellness experts like your personal and family history, and in minutes send you 3 reports that will provide you with not only great tips for lifestyle adjustments for optimal health, but you will also get recommendations to assist you with customizing your nutritional supplementation. http://youtu.be/mgUJIf5cwDU So take the USANA True Health Assessment at https://shop.usana.com/shop/cart/Landing?distributorId=8697548&language=ENU&shopperSource=distWeb TODAY! Also connect with us on our Facebook Page for news, tips & great recipes too! https://www.facebook.com/5DayResetKit?ref=hl We are also on Twitter at https://twitter.com/usanaresetkit http://youtu.be/mgUJIf5cwDU
Views: 1496 Claudia Hill
PTSD and Acute Stress Disorder (ASD)
 
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Training CEUs for Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC) and Licensed Mental Health Counselors (LMHC) by AllCEUs. https://www.allceus.com/member/cart/index/product/id/59/c/ Unlimited CEUs $59 at http://allceus.com 50 to 90% of the population have been exposed to traumatic events during their life. Most individuals do not develop PTSD. For each exposure Proximity Similarity Helplessness Social Support 6-month stressors Hx of mental illness Initial Interventions Stabilizing Supportive medical care Supportive psychiatric care Ensure availability of basic resources Provide information verbally and in writing to the patient and support persons. Avoidant symptoms avoid thoughts, feelings, or conversations associated with the trauma avoid activities, places, or people that arouse recollections of the trauma inability to recall an important aspect of the trauma feeling of detachment or estrangement from others Hypervigilence Symptoms difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep irritability or outbursts of anger difficulty concentrating hypervigilence exaggerated startle response Grief Stages Denial Anger Bargaining Depression Acceptance During the first 48 to 72 hours after a traumatic event, some individuals may be very aroused, anxious, or angry while others may appear minimally affected or numb. Ongoing Treatment establish a therapeutic alliance increase understanding of and coping with the psychosocial effects of the trauma evaluate and manage physical health and functional impairments coordinate care SSRIs Ameliorate all three PTSD symptom clusters Are effective treatments for comorbid disorders May reduce clinical symptoms Have relatively few side effects Choosing Treatments The patient's age and gender Presence of comorbid medical and psychiatric illnesses Propensity for aggression or self-injurious behavior Recency of the precipitating traumatic event Severity and pattern of symptoms Presence of distressing target symptoms Development of problems in psychosocial functioning Preexisting developmental or psychological issues Debriefing Psychological debriefing or single session techniques are not recommended may increase symptoms in some settings appear to be ineffective in treating individuals with ASD and PTSD Triage assessments in a group setting may identify those in need of intervention, but detailed discussion of distressing memories and events should be avoided in the group setting. Supportive Interventions Encourage acutely traumatized patients to rely on: their inherent strengths their existing support networks their own judgments of the need for further intervention Treatment Goals Reducing the severity of symptoms Preventing or treating related comorbid conditions Improving adaptive functioning Restoring a sense of safety and trust Protecting against relapse Restoring normal developmental progression Integrating the trauma into a constructive schema of risk, safety, prevention, and protection Treatment Plan Observable, measurable goals and objectives Interventions and their rationale CBT Targets the distorted threat appraisal process in order to desensitize the patient to trauma related triggers Stress inoculation training Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Focus on the meaning of the trauma in terms of prior psychological conflicts and development Assure patients that they will decide how deeply to explore the difficult events/feelings Normalize their distress Psychoeducation the expected physiological and emotional responses strategies for decreasing secondary or continuous exposure to the trauma stress reduction techniques the importance of remaining mentally active the need to concentrate on self-care tasks Patients with serious mental illness have higher rates of abuse. Depression, substance abuse, panic attacks and severe anxiety are associated with increased risk for suicide. PTSD has demonstrated the strongest association with suicidal behaviors. Family members of victims are not only secondary victims but also one of the major buffers. Aggressive behavior in patients with PTSD results from the anticipatory bias caused by the trauma. Occurs in the context of reexperiencing symptoms. Techniques targeting symptoms may reduce aggression. Personality Disorders Childhood trauma associated with development of PD Features of PTSD and PDs overlap PTSD may be masked by PD symptoms There are many causes for PTSD. Early intervention may be key to preventing later developmental issues in children. Strengths-based, supportive interventions are the best first-line treatments.
Facilitating Client Centered Learning for LPC, LMHC, and Addiction Counselor CEUs
 
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Facilitating Client Centered Learning based on a new best practice. CEUs are available for this class at https://www.allceus.com/member/cart/index/search?q=facilitating Unlimited CEUs $59 at http://allceus.com **View the New Harbinger Catalog and get your 25% discount on their products by entering coupon code: 1168SNIPES when you check out** Objectives Explain why client-centered learning is important Differentiate traditional teaching methods from client centered Define the LEARNS model Identify ways to create a safe environment Explore different learning preferences and teaching methods Discuss ways to evaluate the effectiveness of client centered learning practices Why is it important? Medication errors Decreased ability to interpret labels and health messages Increased hospitalization Greater use of emergency services An earlier discharge from hospitals Understanding complicated treatment plans Making informed decisions Maintaining a healthy lifestyle Communicating their perspective, needs and values Living within difficult socio-economic conditions Managing chronic conditions Accessing community resources Interacting with many healthcare professionals Learning Theory Comparison Traditional Expert Model Teacher decides what is taught, how and when New information is distinct and not linked Client takes new information and implements it All information is given at once Health messages are one-size fits all Learning is cognitive Client-Partnership Model Client and Teacher identify learning goals and methods New information is linked to prior learning Client undergoes an unlearning process before new information is implemented Information is given over time Information is tailored to the diverse needs of the individual Learning is affective, cognitive, social and behavioral LEARNS Model Listen to client Strengths, Needs, Attitudes and Preferences Establish a therapeutic partnership Adopt an intentional approach to every encounter Reinforce health literacy and curiosity Name new knowledge via teach-back Strengthen self-management via links to community resources Learning is : Affective (Motivation-Caring and Empowerment) Behavioral (Motivation-Acting) Cognitive (Comprehension and Learning style) Social (Support, Motivation, Observational Learning) Create a safe environment Clients feel comfortable asking questions Clients are able to bring someone with them to appointments Professionals are aware that some clients are ashamed or anxious when they do not understand Professionals are aware of the client's knowledge and beliefs about their condition(s) Professionals understand how clients perceive the condition or treatment may impact their family Barriers to a safe environment Too much information Jargon Complicated forms and brochures Relying on just words Failing to periodically check for understanding Difficult to navigate systems Lack of reinforcement and support Universal precautions approach Decrease the complexity of the information provided Use concrete example Limit the number of topics covered in one session Use teach-back to ensure comprehension Focus on critical behaviors Example --Nutritional Counseling Motivational (scare) tactics Lack of focus on a few critical behaviors No concrete examples Lack of teach back Example --Nutritional Counseling Decreased complexity Identified three critical behaviors Had the patient give an example of what she may do Assess client learning needs How are you feeling right now Can you tell me what you know about . . . ASK-TELL-ASK What questions or concerns do you have How do you like to learn new things? What helps you to learn new things? Techniques Tailor your approach and educational design by collaborating with the client and the interprofessional team Engage in more structured and intentional approaches when facilitating client centered learning. Use plain language, pictures and illustrations to promote health literacy. Effective educational strategies Printed and/or Online Materials Reading/comprehension Pictograms (medication compliance, exercises) Interaction (workbook, diaries, charts) Telephone Support Groups Observational learning Role play More techniques Audiotapes To learn new material To facilitate client behavior (Relaxation) Video (injections, fitness, relaxation, cooking...) Computer-based technology Assess Client Learning Occurs over time Things to assess Literacy level Understanding What three things will you do over the next week to help you achieve this goal? What risks do you see What will be hardest for you What support do you need Assessment cont... Things to assess cont... Learning preferences Family role in the treatment process Effectiveness of interventions over time Tell me what you did to.... since our last visit What benefits do you see How is this helping you
Genetic Markers of Cardiovascular Disease - H. Robert Superko, M.D.
 
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Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause death in the USA. CVD is now considered to be an interaction between genetic susceptibility and environmental lifestyle issues. Practical clinical utility of inherited cardiovascular risk testing does exist utilizing both phenotypes and genotypes and includes improved CHD risk prediction and early CHD detection, selection of a treatment most likely to be successful in an era of personalized medicine includes genetic susceptibility and the clinical role of currently available tests. Dr. Superko will also discuss the practical implications of genetic tests including 9p21, 4q25, SLCO1B1, ApoE, and others. What is Age Management Medicine? Age Management Medicine is a proactive, preventive approach focused on preservation of optimum human function and quality of life, making every effort to modulate the process of aging prior to the onset of degenerative aging. The basic tenets of Age Management Medicine are patient evaluation through extensive medical history, lifestyle assessment, physical examination and laboratory evaluation to establish personalized proactive treatment plans consisting of proper diet, exercise, stress management and appropriate medical interventions. About AMMG It is the goal of the Age Management Medicine Group (AMMG) to provide education and information on the specialty of Age Management Medicine to physicians and healthcare professionals through evidence-based, continuing medical education conferences, workshops, seminars, publications and Web media. The Group consists of leading industry healthcare professionals, physicians, practitioners, researchers, medical associations and providers of products and services. For more information visit http://www.agemed.org
The Role of Epigenetics in our Genetic Profile - AMMG
 
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Topic: The Role Epigenetics will play in our Genetic Profile S. Michal Jazwinski, Ph.D. Professor of Medicine, Director of the Center of Aging, Tulane University AMMG Interviewer: Florence Comite, M.D. Meet the new medical paradigm Forget the disease-centered, after-the-fact approach to practicing medicine. Age Management Medicine leads you into a new dimension of healthcare that is clinically, scientifically solid with proactive, preventive protocols that deliver better patient outcomes. Typically practiced within the privatepay sector, Age Management Medicine moves you to the forefront—no more third-party interventions—allowing you to focus on what matters: your patients. What is Age Management Medicine? Age Management Medicine is a proactive, preventive approach focused on preservation of optimum human function and quality of life, making every effort to modulate the process of aging prior to the onset of degenerative aging. The basic tenets of Age Management Medicine are patient evaluation through extensive medical history, lifestyle assessment, physical examination and laboratory evaluation to establish personalized proactive treatment plans consisting of proper diet, exercise, stress management and appropriate medical interventions. About AMMG It is the goal of the Age Management Medicine Group (AMMG) to provide education and information on the specialty of Age Management Medicine to physicians and healthcare professionals through evidence-based, continuing medical education conferences, workshops, seminars, publications and Web media. The Group consists of leading industry healthcare professionals, physicians, practitioners, researchers, medical associations and providers of products and services.