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Thyroid Gland, Hormones and Thyroid Problems, Animation
 
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Regulation of thyroid hormone, hyper- and hypothyroidism: causes, symptoms and treatment, goiter. This video and similar images/videos are available for instant download licensing here https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/galleries/images-videos-by-medical-specialties/endocrinology Voice by: Sue Stern ©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped ENDOCRINE gland located in the neck. It is wrapped around the trachea, just below the thyroid cartilage –the Adam’s apple. The two major hormones of the thyroid are triiodothyronine, T3 and thyroxine, T4. The numbers 3 and 4 indicate the number of iodine atoms present in a molecule of each hormone. T3 and T4 are collectively referred to as THYROID hormones. Thyroid hormone secretion is under control of thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH, from the anterior pituitary. TSH, in turn, is induced by thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, produced by the hypothalamus. The amount of circulating thyroid hormones is regulated by a negative feedback loop: when their levels are too high, they SUPPRESS the production of TSH and TRH, consequently INHIBITING their own production. Thyroid hormones act to INCREASE the body’s metabolic rate. They stimulate appetite, digestion, breakdown of nutrients and absorption. They also increase oxygen consumption, raise the breathing rate, heart rate and contraction strength. As a result, the body’s HEAT production is INCREASED. Thyroid hormone secretion usually rises in winter months to keep the body warm. Thyroid hormones are also important for bone growth and fetal brain development. There are 2 major groups of thyroid problems: HYPOthyroidism: when the thyroid does NOT produce ENOUGH hormones, resulting in a LOW metabolic rate, combined with SLOW respiratory and cardiovascular activities. Common symptoms include fatigue, weight gain despite poor appetite, cold intolerance, slow heart rate, heavy menstrual bleeding and constipation. Iodine deficiency and Hashimoto's thyroiditis are the most common causes. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is an autoimmune disease in which the thyroid gland is gradually destroyed by the body’s own immune system. Hypothyroidism, especially when caused by iodine deficiency, may lead to swelling of the thyroid gland, known as GOITER. In an attempt to fix the low levels of thyroid hormones, the pituitary produces MORE TSH to further stimulate the thyroid gland. The thyroid, while UNable to make hormones WITHOUT iodine, responds to TSH by GROWING in size. Hypothyroidism is managed with thyroxine hormone replacement. HYPERthyroidism: when the thyroid gland produces TOO MUCH hormones, resulting in a TOO ACTIVE metabolism, together with respiratory and cardiovascular rates that are HIGHER than necessary. Common symptoms include irritability, insomnia, weight loss despite good appetite, heat intolerance, heart racing and diarrhea. Hyperthyroidism is most commonly caused by Graves' disease, another autoimmune disorder characterized by presence of an antibody, called thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin, TSI. TSI, similar to TSH, stimulates the thyroid gland to produce hormones. Unlike TSH, however, TSI is NOT regulated by negative feedback mechanisms, leading to UNcontrolled production of thyroid hormones. TSI also stimulates the thyroid gland to grow, which MAY lead to formation of a goiter. Hyperthyroidism may be managed with drugs that suppress thyroid function, radioactive iodine that selectively destroys the thyroid gland, or surgery that removes part of the gland.
Views: 79281 Alila Medical Media
Thyroid Gland - Thyroid Hormones
 
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http://armandoh.org/ Talks in detail about thyroid hormones IMAGE: https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B8Ss3-wJfHrpbWpjVC1ZMVN6c1k https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twitter.com/Armando71021105
Views: 537376 Armando Hasudungan
THYROID HORMONES
 
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For more information: http://www.7activestudio.com info@7activestudio.com http://www.7activemedical.com/ info@7activemedical.com http://www.sciencetuts.com/ Contact: +91- 9700061777, 040-64501777 / 65864777 7 Active Technology Solutions Pvt.Ltd. is an educational 3D digital content provider for K-12. We also customise the content as per your requirement for companies platform providers colleges etc . 7 Active driving force "The Joy of Happy Learning" -- is what makes difference from other digital content providers. We consider Student needs, Lecturer needs and College needs in designing the 3D & 2D Animated Video Lectures. We are carrying a huge 3D Digital Library ready to use.
Views: 15596 7activestudio
Thyroid Gland: Thyroid Hormone Function
 
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This lesson explores the physiological role of thyroid hormones. In particular, thyroid hormone transport into target cells, conversion of T4 to T3, binding the nuclear receptor, genomic regulation, and target gene function.
Views: 44939 Lance Miller, PhD
Thyroid Gland
 
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Explanation of Thyroid Gland and hormone secreted. Also, explanation of various diseases caused due to abnormal secretion of hormones. -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "ASEXUAL REPRODUCTION and VEGETATIVE PROPAGATION" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f40Sd6j1Z8g -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
3 - Thyroid Glands : Hormones Physiology
 
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The video describes the process of formation and control of thyroid hormone
Views: 82340 Aim MDS
Thyroid Gland: Thyroid Hormone Synthesis
 
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This lesson explores how the thyroid gland synthesizes and secretes thyroid hormones. In particular, what thyroid hormones are, iodide transport, the enzyme involved in thyroid hormone synthesis, and how thyroid hormones are secreted from the follicular cells of the thyroid gland.
Views: 56107 Lance Miller, PhD
Thyroid gland - What's the function of the thyroid?
 
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In this animation thyroid gland, its structure and function along with the hormones produced are described. Watch the animation "Thyroid problems - most common thyroid problems, symptoms and treatment" to learn more about different thyroid problems. Healthchannel makes complex medical information easy to understand. With 2D and 3D animations checked by medical specialists, we give information on certain diseases: what is it, what are the causes and how is it treated? Subscribe to our Youtube channel and learn more about your health! Healthchannel Youtube channel: http://www.youtube.com/cherishyourhealthtv Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=cherishyourhealthtv Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Healthchannel-cherishyourhealth/277559669029535 Have a look at our other channels as well: http://www.youtube.com/gezondheidspleintv http://www.youtube.com/user/sehtaktv Thanks for watching! Don't forget to like our video and leave a comment.
Thyroid Gland
 
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The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped organ located in the base of your neck. It releases hormones that control metabolism—the way your body uses energy. Hormones are the body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs to affect many different processes, including Growth and development Metabolism - how your body gets energy from the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood The thyroid's hormones regulate vital body functions, including: Breathing Heart rate Central and peripheral nervous systems Body weight Muscle strength Menstrual cycles Body temperature Cholesterol levels and more The thyroid gland is about 5 cm long and lies in front of your throat below the prominence of thyroid cartilage sometimes called the Adam's apple. The thyroid has two sides called lobes that lie on either side of your windpipe, and is usually connected by a strip of thyroid tissue known as an isthmus. Some people do not have an isthmus, and instead have two separate thyroid lobes. How the Thyroid Gland Works The thyroid is part of the endocrine system, which is made up of glands that produce, store, and release hormones into the bloodstream so the hormones can reach the body's cells. The thyroid gland uses iodine from the foods you eat to make two main hormones: Triiodothyronine (T3) Thyroxine (T4) It is important that T3 and T4 levels are neither too high nor too low. Two glands in the brain—the hypothalamus and the pituitary communicate to maintain T3 and T4 balance. The hypothalamus produces TSH Releasing Hormone (TRH) that signals the pituitary to tell the thyroid gland to produce more or less of T3 and T4 by either increasing or decreasing the release of a hormone called thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). When T3 and T4 levels are low in the blood, the pituitary gland releases more TSH to tell the thyroid gland to produce more thyroid hormones. If T3 and T4 levels are high, the pituitary gland releases less TSH to the thyroid gland to slow production of these hormones. Why do we Need a Thyroid Gland T3 and T4 regulate your heart rate and how fast your intestines process food. So if T3 and T4 levels are low, your heart rate may be slower than normal, and you may have constipation/weight gain. If T3 and T4 levels are high, you may have a rapid heart rate and diarrhea/weight loss. If too much T3 and T4 in your body (hyperthyroidism): Anxiety Irritability or moodiness Nervousness, hyperactivity Sweating or sensitivity to high temperatures Hand trembling (shaking) Hair loss Missed or light menstrual periods Some people might experience exopthalmus; If too little T3 and T4 in your body (hypothyroidism): Trouble sleeping Tiredness and fatigue Difficulty concentrating Dry skin and hair Depression Sensitivity to cold temperature Frequent, heavy periods Joint and muscle pain Call your doctor immediately if you’re suffering from any symptoms of the mentioned above. All the best
Views: 10364 Alyaa Gad
Thyroid Gland Function
 
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Views: 8764 susannaheinze
Endocrine System - Thyroid & Pituitary Glands & Hormones
 
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Endocrine System includes Tyhroid Gland as well as the Pituitary Gland that is controled by the hormones of Hypothalamus. I explained almost all the hormones that can be found in these glands and it is really important to learn them all. http://www.biodigitalhuman.com/. Music. Easy Lemon 60 Second by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-... Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Continue Life by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-... Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Breast Anatomical Illustration: Original author: Patrick J. Lynch. Reworked by Morgoth666 to add numbered legend arrows. - Patrick J. Lynch, medical illustrator This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license. Please, subscribe to get our newest videos and lessons: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... My Facebook fan page: https://www.facebook.com/FahriceDjozic3
Views: 5308 Easy and Simple!
Human Physiology - Thyroid Hormone Feedback and Function
 
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“Human Physiology” is a free online course on Janux that is open to anyone. Learn more at http://janux.ou.edu. Created by the University of Oklahoma, Janux is an interactive learning community that gives learners direct connections to courses, education resources, faculty, and each other. Janux courses are freely available or may be taken for college credit by enrolled OU students. Dr. Heather R. Ketchum is an Associate Professor of Biology. Video produced by NextThought (http://nextthought.com). Copyright © 2000-2014 The Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma, All Rights Reserved.
Views: 33026 Janux
Thyroid and Thyroid hormone function
 
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Dr Mike discusses the thyroid gland and function of the thyroid hormones (T3 and T4). This video includes: - Role of iodine in thyroid hormone production - How T3 (triiodothyronine) and T4 (thyroxine) is produced - Role of the hypothalamus (thyrotropin releasing hormone) - Role of the anterior pituitary gland (Thyroid stimulating hormone) - Role of selenium in T3 production - Where thyroid hormones work in the body? - Hyperthyroidism (Graves diseases) - Hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis) And more!!
Endocrinology | Synthesis of Thyroid Hormone
 
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Ninja Nerds, Join us in this video where we discuss the synthesis of thyroid hormone, and the steps needed to produce this hormone. ***PLEASE SUPPORT US*** PATREON | https://www.patreon.com/NinjaNerdScience ***EVERY DOLLAR HELPS US GROW & IMPROVE OUR QUALITY*** FACEBOOK | https://www.facebook.com/NinjaNerdScience INSTAGRAM | https://www.instagram.com/ninjanerdscience/ ✎ For general inquiries email us at: NinjaNerdScience@gmail.com
Views: 13680 Ninja Nerd Science
Endocrine System, part 1 - Glands & Hormones: Crash Course A&P #23
 
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Hank begins teaching you about your endocrine system by explaining how it uses glands to produce hormones. These hormones are either amino-acid based and water soluble, or steroidal and lipid-soluble, and may target many types of cells or just turn on specific ones. He will also touch on hormone cascades, and how the HPA axis effects your stress response. Table of Contents Endocrine System 2:32 Glands Produce Hormones 2:58 Amino Acid Based and Water Soluble 4:18 Steroidal and Lipid Soluble 4:44 Hormone Cascades 6:15 HPA Axis Effects Your Stress Response 6:30 *** Crash Course Psychology Poster: http://www.dftba.com/crashcourse *** Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Sandra Aft, Brad Wardell, Christian Ludvigsen, Robert Kunz, Jason, A Saslow, Jacob Ash, Jeffrey Thompson, Jessica Simmons, James Craver, Simun Niclasen, SR Foxley, Roger C. Rocha, Nevin, Spoljaric, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jessica Wode ***SUBBABLE MESSAGES*** TO: Laura Hewett FROM: Amy Paez Greetings from the other side of the world! DFTBA -- TO: Wesley FROM: G Distance is created by the Desert Otherworld, therefore we shall not be destroyed. ***SUPPORTER THANK YOU!*** Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: Mickey Maloney, Dan Smalley, Stephen DeCubellis, Vanessa Benavent, Andrew Galante, LankySam!, David Costello, Vanessa Benavent, Kenzo Yasuda, Tessa White -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1959973 CrashCourse
Thyroid Gland | Structure , Functions & Diseases
 
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The thyroid gland, or simply the thyroid is an endocrine gland in the neck, consisting of two lobes connected by an isthmus. It is found at the front of the neck, below the Adam's apple. The thyroid gland secretes thyroid hormones, which primarily influence the metabolic rate and protein synthesis. The hormones also have many other effects including those on development. The thyroid hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) are created from iodine and tyrosine. The thyroid also produces the hormone calcitonin, which plays a role in calcium homeostasis. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thyroid
Views: 21690 Hussain Biology
Thyroid Hormone Production
 
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http://www.handwrittentutorials.com - This tutorial takes a look at the production of thyroid hormones in the Thyroid Gland. This includes the transport of iodine and the production of thyroglobulin in the Thyroid Follicles. For more entirely FREE tutorials and accompanying PDFs visit http://www.handwrittentutorials.com
Views: 268307 Handwritten Tutorials
Thyroid Gland: Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Thyroid Axis - Role of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH)
 
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This lesson explores the regulation of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) synthesis and secretion, as well as how TSH regulates the synthesis and secretion of the thyroid hormones T3 and T4. TSH is synthesized and secreted by thyrotrophs within the anterior pituitary. Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) stimulates the synthesis and secretion of TSH, while T3 inhibits the synthesis and secretion of TSH in a negative-feedback loop. TSH stimulates the synthesis and secretion of T3 and T4 by regulating most aspects of T3 and T4 synthesis and secretion. For help preparing for an exam on this and other topics, visit http://www.aniveo.com
Views: 16823 Lance Miller, PhD
Thyroid Hormone Regulation - Negative Feedback Loop [Hypothalamus and Anterior Pitutiary]
 
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The production and release of thyroid hormones, thyroxine and triiodothyronine, is controlled by a feedback loop system which involves the hypothalamus, the anterior pituitary gland and the thyroid.  The hypothalamus secretes a hormone, called thyrotropin-releasing hormone, which in turn, stimulates the pituitary gland to produce thyroid stimulating hormone. We will abbreviate these with T R H and T S H. The T S H, the thyroid stimulating hormone, than stimulates the production of the thyroid hormones, thyroxine and triiodothyronine, by the thyroid gland. T S H binds to the T S H receptor which is located on thyroid cells. The T S H receptor is a member of the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily and this basically means that it’s integrated in the cell membrane of the thyroid and stimulates intracellular activity. To be more specific, this process activates most functional aspects of the thyroid epithelial cell that we discussed in the previous video, including iodide pumping; thyroglobulin synthesis, iodination, endocytosis and proteolysis; thyroid peroxidase activity; and hormone release. If you have not seen the first video, click on this box to view it. Also a link to the video can be found in the description. This hormone production system is regulated by a negative feedback loop so that when the levels of the thyroid hormones, T3 and T4, increase, they prevent the release of both thyrotropin-releasing hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone. This system allows the body to maintain a constant level of thyroid hormones in the body. This is also the mechanism to prevent both hypo and hyperthyroidism, which means not enough or too much thyroid hormone production, respectively. It should also be mentioned that cold temperatures also stimulate the release of thyrotropin releasing hormone by the hypothalamus, which means that the thyroid hormones will also be elevated to increase the basic metabolic rate. This causes the body to produce more heat to compensate the cold temperature. Another factor that also affects this feedback loop is the amount of stress. During stress, more cortisol will be produced by the adrenal glands, which, on its turn, can decrease the amount of TSH released. So this decreases the amount of thyroid hormones in the end and signs of hypothyroidism may develop. Click Here For Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmPKx-AhYPU
Views: 36790 TheMedicalZone
Thyroxine : Mechanism of Action of Thyroid Hormones
 
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More videos of this series- http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLz27Rlp3y6XvpbG1vycTd8sJ7g2oHP0dH Visit our website: http://doctorprodigious.wordpress.com . Visit our website: http://doctorprodigious.wordpress.com/
Views: 66200 Dr. Prodigious
How to remember hormone and their functions with easy trick
 
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How to remember hormone and their functions with easy trick - This lecture explains tricks and tips to remember the name and function of hormones secreted from different glands in human body. This video states the name of hormones secreted from thyroid gland, adrenal gland, parathyroid gland, pancreas and the function of all the secreted hormones are also mentioned in this video. This video will guide you to remember hormone names and their functions in details with the help of this simple trick video. For more information, log on to- http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching the video lecture mnemonics on hormones name and functions with easy tricks.
Views: 34956 Shomu's Biology
Thyroid Hormones and Thyroid Function Tests
 
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An overview of the synthesis, regulation, and function of thyroid hormones, as well as the interpretation of thyroid function tests.
Views: 101526 Strong Medicine
Thyroid Gland and Thyroid Hormones - [T3, T4, Thyroglobulin, Iodide Trapping etc.]
 
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In this video will have a look at the Thyroid Gland and the process of thyroid hormone production. The Thyroid secretes hormones that govern many of the metabolic and growth functions in your body, the hormones are called thyroxine and triiodothyronine, commonly called T4 and T3, respectively. Under the influence of a hormone secreted by the Anterior Pituitary gland, which is called thyroid stimulating hormone, the thyroid will manufacture and secrete T3 and T4 thereby raising their blood levels. Thyroid hormone production: About one fifth of ingested iodides are selectively removed from the circulating blood by the cells of the thyroid gland and used for synthesis of the thyroid hormones. The iodides first have to leave the circulation and enter the thyroid cells. This is achieved by the action of a sodium-iodide symporter, which co-transports one iodide ion along with two sodium ions across the basolateral membrane into the thyroid cell. This symporter uses the sodium gradient that is created by another pump: the sodium-potassium ATPase pump. Once inside the follicular epithelial cells, Iodide is transported into the follicle: across the apical membrane: by pendrin. Thyroglobulin contain tyrosine amino acids to which the iodide ions will bind. T3 and T4 are produced within the thyroglobulin molecule. Conversion of the iodide ions to an oxidized form of iodine. This process is promoted by the enzyme peroxidase. The second steps is organification of thyroglobulin. Which means the Iodination of Tyrosine and Formation of the Thyroid Hormones. This process results in both monoiodotyrosine (MIT) and diiodotyrosine (DIT). DIT and MIT will combine to form T3 and T4. Another important thing to remember is the fact that not all DIT and MIT will combine, therefore the current thyroglobulin will contain all before mentioned forms: MIT, DIT, T3 and T4. Also the proportions in T3 and T4 are different: each thyroglobulin molecule contains up to 30 thyroxine (or T4) molecules and just a few triiodothyronine (or T3) molecules. Interestingly, in this form, the thyroid hormones are stored in the follicles in an amount sufficient to supply the body with its normal requirements of thyroid hormones for 2 to 3 months. Therefore, when synthesis of thyroid hormone is decreased, the physiologic effects of deficiency are not observed for several months. Now we will have a look at the process of releasing the hormones into the circulation. The apical surface of the thyroid cells close around the thryroglobulins. This creates pinocytic vesicles in the cells. The vesicles will fuse with lysosomes to digest and cleave the thyroglublin molecules and release thyroxine and triiodothyronine in free form. These T3 and T4 molecules will diffuse into the surrounding capillaries, so they enter the blood circulation. In the circulation, they will combine with plasma proteins known as thyroxine-binding globulin. Because about 75 percent of the iodinated tyrosine in the thyroglobulin will remain monoiodotyrosine and diiodotyrosine, this is not functional and therefore should not enter the circulation. Instead, the iodine is cleaved from them by a deiodinase enzyme, making the iodine available for recycling in new hormones. About 93 percent of the thyroid hormone released from the thyroid gland is normally thyroxine and only 7 percent is triiodothyronine. However, in the peripheral tissues, T4 will be turning into T3 for a great part: its deiodinated. So, simply said, the function of the thyroid gland is to take iodide, found in many foods, and convert it into thyroid hormones: thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). So what is the role of these thyroid hormones actually? The general effect of thyroid hormone is to activate nuclear transcription of large numbers of genes, hereby causing a higher basic metabolic rate, mainly through induction of increased protein synthesis. The net result is generalized increase in functional activity throughout the body. Increased activity is for example seen in the cardiovascular system, growth rate, and the central nervous system. Without thyroxine and triiodothyronine from the thyroid gland, almost all the chemical reactions of the body would become sluggish and the person would become sluggish as well. A final, clinically important, thing to know: During development (inside the womb) the thyroid gland originates in the back of the tongue, but it normally migrates to the front of the neck before birth. Sometimes it fails to migrate properly and is located high in the neck or even in the back of the tongue. Do you want to know how the hypothalamus and the Thyroid stimulating hormone from the pituitary gland are regulating the thyroid hormone production: https://youtu.be/QG-UbtFEc_c
Views: 25974 TheMedicalZone
How Does Pituitary Gland Work? Hormones of Hypophysis Functions & Disorders Animation -TSH FSH Video
 
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The pituitary gland is often referred to as the "master gland" of the body, since it regulates many activities of other endocrine glands. Located above the pituitary gland is the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus decides which hormones the pituitary should release by sending it either hormonal or electrical messages. In response to hormonal messages from the hypothalamus, the pituitary gland releases the following hormones: GH (growth hormone) – increases size of muscle and bone TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) – stimulates the thyroid gland to release T3 and T4 to stimulate metabolism in other cells throughout the body FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) – stimulates ovarian follicle production in women; stimulates sperm production in men LH (luteinizing hormone) – stimulates ovaries to produce estrogen in women; stimulates sperm production in men Prolactin – stimulates breast tissue in nursing mothers to produce milk ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) - causes the adrenal glands to produce important substances that have properties similar to steroids In response to electrical messages from the hypothalamus, the pituitary gland releases the following hormones: ADH (antidiuretic hormone) - stimulates the kidneys to reabsorb fluid and produce less urine Oxytocin – initiates labor, uterine contractions and milk ejection in mothers The pituitary gland, or hypophysis, is an endocrine gland about the size of a pea and weighing 0.5 grams (0.018 oz) in humans. It is a protrusion off the bottom of the hypothalamus at the base of the brain. The hypophysis rests upon the hypophysial fossa of the sphenoid bone in the center of the middle cranial fossa and is surrounded by a small bony cavity (sella turcica) covered by a dural fold (diaphragma sellae). The anterior pituitary (or adenohypophysis) is a lobe of the gland that regulates several physiological processes (including stress, growth, reproduction, and lactation). The intermediate lobe synthesizes and secretes melanocyte-stimulating hormone. The posterior pituitary (or neurohypophysis) is a lobe of the gland that is functionally connected to the hypothalamus by the median eminence via a small tube called the pituitary stalk Hormones secreted from the pituitary gland help control the following body processes: Growth Blood pressure Some aspects of pregnancy and childbirth including stimulation of uterine contractions during childbirth Breast milk production Sex organ functions in both males and females Thyroid gland function The conversion of food into energy (metabolism) Water and osmolarity regulation in the body Water balance via the control of reabsorption of water by the kidneys Temperature regulation Pain relief Sleeping patterns (pineal gland) Some of the diseases involving the pituitary gland are: Central diabetes insipidus caused by a deficiency of vasopressin. Gigantism and acromegaly caused by an excess of growth hormone in childhood and adult respectively. Hypothyroidism caused by a deficiency of thyroid-stimulating hormone. Hyperpituitarism, the increased (hyper) secretion of one or more of the hormones normally produced by the pituitary gland. Hypopituitarism, the decreased (hypo) secretion of one or more of the hormones normally produced by the pituitary gland. Panhypopituitarism a decreased secretion of most of the pituitary hormones. Pituitary tumours. Pituitary adenomas, noncancerous tumors that occur in the pituitary gland. Somatotrophins: Human growth hormone (HGH), also referred to as 'growth hormone' (GH), and also as somatotropin, is released under the influence of hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), and is inhibited by hypothalamic somatostatin Thyrotrophins: Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), is released under the influence of hypothalamic thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and is inhibited by somatostatin. Corticotropins: Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and Beta-endorphin are released under the influence of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Lactotrophins: Prolactin (PRL), also known as 'Luteotropic' hormone (LTH), Gonadotropins: Luteinizing hormone (also referred to as 'Lutropin' or 'LH'). Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), both released under influence of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) The intermediate lobe synthesizes and secretes the following important endocrine hormone: Melanocyte–stimulating hormone (MSH). This is also produced in the anterior lobe. When produced in the intermediate lobe, MSHs are sometimes called "intermedins". Posterior: Magnocellular Neurons: Antidiuretic hormone (ADH, also known as vasopressin and arginine vasopressin AVP), the majority of which is released from the supraoptic nucleus in the hypothalamus. Oxytocin, most of which is released from the paraventricular nucleus in the hypothalamus.
Views: 162824 AniMed
Thyroid Gland
 
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The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped organ located in the base of your neck. It releases hormones that control metabolism—the way your body uses energy. Hormones are the body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs to affect many different processes, including Growth and development Metabolism - how your body gets energy from the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood The thyroid's hormones regulate vital body functions, including: Breathing Heart rate Central and peripheral nervous systems Body weight Muscle strength Menstrual cycles Body temperature Cholesterol levels and more The thyroid gland is about 5 cm long and lies in front of your throat below the prominence of thyroid cartilage sometimes called the Adam's apple. The thyroid has two sides called lobes that lie on either side of your windpipe, and is usually connected by a strip of thyroid tissue known as an isthmus. Some people do not have an isthmus, and instead have two separate thyroid lobes. How the Thyroid Gland Works The thyroid is part of the endocrine system, which is made up of glands that produce, store, and release hormones into the bloodstream so the hormones can reach the body's cells. The thyroid gland uses iodine from the foods you eat to make two main hormones: Triiodothyronine (T3) Thyroxine (T4) It is important that T3 and T4 levels are neither too high nor too low. Two glands in the brain—the hypothalamus and the pituitary communicate to maintain T3 and T4 balance. The hypothalamus produces TSH Releasing Hormone (TRH) that signals the pituitary to tell the thyroid gland to produce more or less of T3 and T4 by either increasing or decreasing the release of a hormone called thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). When T3 and T4 levels are low in the blood, the pituitary gland releases more TSH to tell the thyroid gland to produce more thyroid hormones. If T3 and T4 levels are high, the pituitary gland releases less TSH to the thyroid gland to slow production of these hormones. Why do we Need a Thyroid Gland T3 and T4 regulate your heart rate and how fast your intestines process food. So if T3 and T4 levels are low, your heart rate may be slower than normal, and you may have constipation/weight gain. If T3 and T4 levels are high, you may have a rapid heart rate and diarrhea/weight loss. If too much T3 and T4 in your body (hyperthyroidism): Anxiety Irritability or moodiness Nervousness, hyperactivity Sweating or sensitivity to high temperatures Hand trembling (shaking) Hair loss Missed or light menstrual periods Some people might experience exopthalmus; If too little T3 and T4 in your body (hypothyroidism): Trouble sleeping Tiredness and fatigue Difficulty concentrating Dry skin and hair Depression Sensitivity to cold temperature Frequent, heavy periods Joint and muscle pain Call your doctor immediately if you’re suffering from any symptoms of the mentioned above. All the best
Views: 545 iUnderstand.tv
8 Signs That Indicate Problem With Thyroid Gland
 
04:26
8 Signs That Indicate Problem With Thyroid Gland The thyroid, located in the neck, is a vital body gland, as it is responsible for numerous functions in the body. It produces hormones that regulate the metabolism, so the imbalance of those hormones severely affects the natural balance of the body. Yet, the thyroid dysfunction is hard to be diagnosed, as its symptoms are similar to other health issues. Therefore, it is of high importance to recognize its symptoms and solve these problems on time. These are the 8 symptoms of thyroid issues that should not be ignored: Frequent pains in the muscles or joints– This is an indication that should not be ignored, so you must visit your doctor and check whether you are experiencing thyroid issues. Bloating and swelling – Hypothyroidism can often lead to bloating. On the other hand, if you notice swelling or puffiness in the face, you should immediately check your thyroid gland. Trembling and anxiety – Sometimes, the excessive production of thyroid hormones may lead to accelerated metabolism and thus can make you feel irritated, nervous, shaky, and you can also experience concentration issues. Weight changes – Hypothyroidism can lead to unexplained weight gain, and on the other hand, hyperthyroidism can lead to rapid weight loss. Irregular menstruation – Thyroid problems can cause two kinds of abnormal menstruation: hypothyroidism leads to extremely difficult and long menstruation and hyperthyroidism causes small flow or no menstrual cycle at all. Change in mental functions – Reduced levels of thyroid hormones cause constant fatigue and feelings of tiredness and dizziness. Abnormal reaction to the temperature outside – In the case of thyroid gland disorders, people may react differently to the temperature outside than others. In the case of hyperthyroidism, people feel abnormal warmness, while the ones with hypothyroidism feel unnatural cold. Hair loss, facial pallor – The thyroid gland issues can also be manifested by hair loss, weak, brittle and dry hair. https://youtu.be/nISFLnLPoTc
Views: 418915 Susana Home Remedies
The Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland, Animation.
 
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Endocrine functions of the hypothalamus and hypophysis. This video and similar images/videos are available for instant download licensing here https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/galleries/images-videos-by-medical-specialties/endocrinology Voice by: Brittany Steele ©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia The hypothalamus and the pituitary gland are at the center of endocrine function. The hypothalamus is part of the brain, while the pituitary, also called hypophysis (hy-POFF-ih-sis), is an endocrine gland. The hypothalamus links the nervous system to the endocrine system via the pituitary gland. The two structures are located at the base of the brain and are connected by a thin stalk. The hypothalamus produces several hormones, known as neurohormones, which control the secretion of other hormones by the pituitary. Pituitary hormones, in turn, control the production of yet other hormones by other endocrine glands. The pituitary has two distinct lobes: The anterior pituitary, also called adenohypophysis (AD-eh-no-hy-POFF-ih-sis), communicates with the hypothalamus via a network of blood vessels known as the hypophyseal portal system. Several neurohormones produced by the hypothalamus are secreted into the portal system to reach the anterior pituitary, where they stimulate or inhibit production of pituitary hormones. Major hormones include: - Gonadotropin-releasing hormone, GnRH, a hypothalamic hormone, stimulates the anterior pituitary to produce follicle-stimulating hormone, FSH, and luteinizing hormone, LH. FSH and LH, in turn, control the activities of the gonads – the ovaries and testes. - Corticotropin-releasing hormone, CRH, promotes the secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone, ACTH, which in turn stimulates production of cortisol by the adrenal gland. - Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, promotes the release of thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH, and prolactin. TSH, in turn, induces the thyroid gland to produce thyroid hormones. Prolactin stimulates the mammary glands to produce milk. - Prolactin-inhibiting hormone, PIH, inhibits production of prolactin. - Growth hormone–releasing hormone, GHRH, promotes production of growth hormone, or somatotropin, which has widespread effects on the growth of various tissues in the body. - Growth hormone–inhibiting hormone, GHIH, or somatostatin, inhibits production of growth hormone. The posterior pituitary, also called neurohypophysis, communicates with the hypothalamus via a bundle of nerve fibers. These are essentially hypothalamic neurons with cell bodies located in the hypothalamus while their axons EXTENDED to posterior pituitary. These neurons produce hormones, transport them down the stalk, and store them at the nerve terminals within the posterior pituitary, where they wait for a nerve signal to trigger their release. Two hormones have been identified so far: - Vasopressin, also known as antidiuretic hormone, ADH, acts on the kidneys to retain water. - Oxytocin causes the uterus to contract during childbirth and stimulates contractions of the milk ducts in lactating women. All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 38566 Alila Medical Media
Thyroid Gland - Thyroid Follicles - Parafollicular Cells - Thyroid Hormones - T3 T4 and Calcitonin
 
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Check out the following links below! Over 1000+ Medical Questions: http://www.5minuteschool.com DONATE + SUPPORT US: http://paypal.me/5minuteschool Patreon: https://goo.gl/w841fz Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/5MinuteSchool Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/5minuteschool My personal Instagram: http://instagram.com/shahzaebb Contact us: contact@5minuteschool.com ______ In this video we talk about the thyroid gland, thyroid follicles, parafollicular cells and hormones which are produced. ◅ Donate: http://www.5minuteschool.com/donate ◅ Website: htttp://www.5minuteschool.com ◅ Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/5minuteschool ◅ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/5minuteschool ◅ Email: contact@5minuteschool.com
Views: 4319 5MinuteSchool
Thyroid Gland
 
12:06
Donate here: http://www.aklectures.com/donate.php Website video: http://www.aklectures.com/lecture/thyroid-gland Facebook link: https://www.facebook.com/aklectures Website link: http://www.aklectures.com
Views: 40255 AK LECTURES
Thyroid Hormone 2 - Feedback
 
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http://www.handwrittentutorials.com - This tutorial explores the feedback action of thyroxine on the Hypothalamus and Pituitary gland. It is the sequel to the video: 'Thyroid Hormone 1 - Control'. For more entirely FREE tutorials and accompanying PDFs visit http://www.handwrittentutorials.com
Views: 82128 Handwritten Tutorials
Endocrine System, part 2 - Hormone Cascades: Crash Course A&P #24
 
09:34
In the second half of our look at the endocrine system, Hank discusses chemical homeostasis and hormone cascades. Specifically, he looks at the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, or HPT axis, and all the ways your body can suffer when that system, or your hormones in general, get out of whack. Table of Contents Chemical Homeostasis 1:04 Hormone Cascades 2:37 HPT Axis 3:25 Crash Course Psychology posters available now at DFTBA.com! http://www.dftba.com/crashcourse *** Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Sandra Aft, Brad Wardell, Christian Ludvigsen, Robert Kunz, Jason, A Saslow, Jacob Ash, Jeffrey Thompson, Jessica Simmons, James Craver, Simun Niclasen, SR Foxley, Roger C. Rocha, Nevin, Spoljaric, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jessica Wode ***SUBBABLE MESSAGES*** TO: Rachel FROM: Alex I Love You! -- TO: Crash Course FROM: James Earle I loved Subbable. I'll see you on Patreon. ***SUPPORTER THANK YOU!*** Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: Megan McChristy, Matthew Feickert, Tara D. Kane, Gage Ledbetter, Benjamin Perea, Chad Walter, Janel Christensen, Alura Embrey, Ken Johnson, Harland Wirth -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 967681 CrashCourse
Gland thyroid: How does it work?
 
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this video is to observe the way in which the thyroid gland works, showing how it produces the hormones secreted. for physiology obstetricia , universidad autonoma.
Views: 17237 Henry OutControl
Thyroid and Parathyroid glands 2-2-16
 
13:56
Description of the thyroid gland, its hormones (T3, T4, and calcitonin), and some thyroid disorders. Description also of the parathyroid glands and parathyroid hormone.
Views: 5324 Ren Hartung
Endocrine gland hormone review | Endocrine system physiology | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
11:39
Welcome to the Endocrine System. Get ready to learn about one of the most important ways that our body parts communicate! By Ryan Patton. . Created by Ryan Scott Patton. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-endocrine-system/rn-the-endocrine-system/v/hypothalamus-and-pituitary-gland?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/hematologic-system-diseases/rn-myeloproliferative-disorders/v/what-is-primary-myelofibrosis?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 848727 khanacademymedicine
Thyroid Gland Physiology made simple- in HD
 
22:42
Please watch: "LEARN HEART SOUNDS IN 20 MINUTES!!!" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NrdZhCXtc7Q -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- ▶▶▶ Watch More Videos at http://www.ftplectures.com◀◀◀ The thyroid gland physiology entails the production of thyroid hormones, thyroxine which is needed for growth, CNS maturation, and metabolism in the body.
Views: 146258 ftplectures
The Endocrine System Explained - Major Glands | Hormones Produced
 
17:53
Uses animation to describe the major endocrine glands, the hormones they produce, and the contributions that these hormones make to growth, reproduction, metabolism, and homeostasis https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0LHEYTEAyndlUqRJYtBZEg
Thyroid Gland - Chemical Coordination & Integration - NEET & AIIMS preparation videos
 
18:12
BUY to Enroll in FULL NEETPrep Online Video Course. Call or Whatsapp at 8527521718. NEETPrep Online Video course contains 500+ hours of videos covering all 97 chapters(PCB) in NEET Syllabus. Enroll today to SMARTLY prepare for NEET Exam.
Views: 42584 NEETprep
Thyroid problems - most common thyroid problems, symptoms and treatment
 
04:11
This animation is about most common thyroid problems. Hypothyrodism, hyperthyrodism and goiter and their causes are explained. Also symptoms which occur in these disorders are mentioned. Finally, we discuss the possible treatments. Watch the animation "Thyroid gland - Structure and function" to learn more about the thyroid's function and different hormones it produces. Healthchannel makes complex medical information easy to understand. With 2D and 3D animations checked by medical specialists, we give information on certain diseases: what is it, what are the causes and how is it treated? Subscribe to our Youtube channel and learn more about your health! Healthchannel Youtube channel: http://www.youtube.com/cherishyourhealthtv Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=cherishyourhealthtv Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Healthchannel-cherishyourhealth/277559669029535 Have a look at our other channels as well: http://www.youtube.com/gezondheidspleintv http://www.youtube.com/user/sehtaktv Thanks for watching! Don't forget to like our video and leave a comment."
The Endocrine System
 
13:47
Paul Andersen explains the major elements in the endocrine system. He explains how glands produce hormones which target cells. He differentiates between water soluble and lipid soluble hormones. He then describes the hormones and actions of ten glands; pineal, anterior pituitary, posterior pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, pancreas, adrenal cortex, adrenal medulla, testes and ovaries. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
Views: 1340878 Bozeman Science
Thyroid Hormone 1 - Control
 
06:34
http://www.handwrittentutorials.com - This tutorial explores the control of Thyroid Hormone, in particular the function of the Hypothalamus and Pituitary gland. For more entirely FREE tutorials and accompanying PDFs visit http://www.handwrittentutorials.com
Views: 106104 Handwritten Tutorials
Thyroid and Parathyroid Glands
 
22:42
This video considers the hormones produced by the thyroid and parathyroid glands.
Views: 21282 Ray Cinti
THE FUNCTIONS OF THE THYROID GLAND
 
01:41
THE FUNCTIONS OF THE THYROID GLAND The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped organ located in the base of your neck. It releases hormones that control metabolism—the way your body uses energy. The thyroid's hormones regulate vital body functions, including: Breathing Heart rate Central and peripheral nervous systems Body weight Muscle strength Menstrual cycles Body temperature Cholesterol levels Much more! The thyroid gland is about 2-inches long and lies in front of your throat below the prominence of thyroid cartilage sometimes called the Adam's apple. The thyroid has two sides called lobes that lie on either side of your windpipe, and is usually connected by a strip of thyroid tissue known as an isthmus. Some people do not have an isthmus, and instead have two separate thyroid lobes. How the Thyroid Gland Works The thyroid is part of the endocrine system, which is made up of glands that produce, store, and release hormones into the bloodstream so the hormones can reach the body's cells. The thyroid gland uses iodine from the foods you eat to make two main hormones: Triiodothyronine (T3) Thyroxine (T4) It is important that T3 and T4 levels are neither too high nor too low. Two glands in the brain—the hypothalamus and the pituitary communicate to maintain T3 and T4 balance. The hypothalamus produces TSH Releasing Hormone (TRH) that signals the pituitary to tell the thyroid gland to produce more or less of T3 and T4 by either increasing or decreasing the release of a hormone called thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). When T3 and T4 levels are low in the blood, the pituitary gland releases more TSH to tell the thyroid gland to produce more thyroid hormones. If T3 and T4 levels are high, the pituitary gland releases less TSH to the thyroid gland to slow production of these hormones. Listed below are other symptoms of too much T3 and T4 in your body (hyperthyroidism): Anxiety Irritability or moodiness Nervousness, hyperactivity Sweating or sensitivity to high temperatures Hand trembling (shaking) Hair loss Missed or light menstrual periods The following is other symptoms of too little T3 and T4 in your body (hypothyroidism): Trouble sleeping Tiredness and fatigue Difficulty concentrating Dry skin and hair Depression Sensitivity to cold temperature Frequent, heavy periods Joint and muscle pain
Views: 207 Arif Ahmad khan
How Does the Thyroid gland Work?
 
27:49
Your thyroid gland is highly regulated at multiple steps in the body. In order for the thyroid gland to function optimally there are no less than 6 important steps that must work correctly. These steps include: 1. TRH secretion 2. TSH secretion 3. Thyroid gland secretion of thyroid hormones 4. Thyroid hormone conversion 5. Thyroid hormone cellular activation 6. Feedback loop Problems can occur at all 6 stages and may not be picked up with standard lab tests. Learn the basics of thyroid physiology and how the thyroid gland functions in this video. If you enjoyed this video please subscribe on youtube or leave a comment on my podcast here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/dr-westin-childs-podcast-thyroid-weight-loss-hormones/id1141207688?mt=2 More information in the video and the full blog post can be found here: https://www.restartmed.com/thyroid-gland/ You can read more on my website here: https://www.restartmed.com/ This video is not intended to be used as medical advice. If you have questions about your health please consult your physician or primary care provider. Dr. Westin Childs goes to great lengths to produce high quality content but this is NOT a substitute for medical care.
Views: 589 Dr. Westin Childs
Thyroid Gland : Physiology And Regulation
 
15:35
In this video ,I have discussed about the Thyroid Gland physiology and Regulation of Thyroid Hormone Secretion , Negative feedback mechanism has been discussed.
The pancreas, testes and ovaries are endocrine glands | Biology | Anatomy
 
05:10
To purchase this program please visit http://www.greatpacificmedia.com/ Segment from the program The Endocrine System: Molecular Messengers, Chemical Control. DVD Description Our Endocrine System DVD first looks at the chemical structure of various hormones, the hormone receptors found on target cells, and the feedback mechanisms that regulate hormone levels. After explaining the difference between exocrine and endocrine glands the program then looks at the various endocrine glands and organs including: the hypothalamus; the pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid and adrenal glands; the pancreas, testes and ovaries; and organs such as the thymus, kidneys, stomach, small intestine and heart that produce hormones.
Views: 52025 greatpacificmedia
The Thyroid Gland | Complete Anatomy
 
01:56
Subscribe to 3D4Medical channel to learn more about the human body: https://goo.gl/8k5KzR The thyroid gland is a small, butterfly-shaped organ that can be found at the front of the neck. It lies at the level between the fifth cervical vertebrae and the 1st thoracic vertebrae. It is highly vascular and weighs about 25g. It may be small but it is very important, as it secretes hormones that act on several parts of your body, affecting them in different ways. The thyroid gland secretes Calcitonin, as well as T3 and T4, which are commonly known as the thyroid hormones. Calcitonin regulates bone growth while the thyroid hormones regulate growth and development in young people, and play an important role in maintaining a healthy metabolism. An excess of thyroid hormones results in overstimulation of the sympathetic nervous system, leading to an increased heart rate, palpitations, hyperventilation, tremors, heat intolerance and angina. A deficiency will result in a reduced heart rate, tiredness, cold intolerance and so on. Thyroid hormones also have an important role to play in glucose metabolism; they stimulate digestive tract motility to aid in absorption, increase the production of glucose by gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, and enhance the uptake of glucose into cells. Therefore, those suffering from hyperthyroidism commonly experience weight loss, and increased appetite, while those with hypothyroidism will experience weight gain and constipation. Thyroid hormones also play an important role in maintaining normal sleep and sexual function. The secretion of the thyroid hormone from the thyroid gland is regulated by other endocrine structures in the brain, the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. The three structures work through a feedback system which is determined by the amount of thyroid hormone in the bloodstream. When the levels of thyroid hormone are low, the hypothalamus picks up the signal and secretes a precursor hormone TRH. TRH stimulates the secretion of Thyroid stimulating hormone or TSH from the pituitary gland. TSH stimulates the secretion of Thyroid hormone which goes on to affect the metabolism of the heart, liver, kidney, muscles and reproductive organs. On the other hand, When thyroid hormone levels are high there is a reduction in the amount of TSH and thyroid hormone secreted. And this, in turn reduces its effects on digestive and reproductive systems, the bones, muscles,as well as the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Download Complete Anatomy on Mac: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/complete-anatomy/id1141323850?mt=12&at=1010l8cc&ct=yt&pt=87498 Download Complete Anatomy on iOS: https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/app/complete-anatomy/id1054948424?mt=8&at=1010l8cc&ct=yt&pt=87498 Download Complete Anatomy on Windows: http://clkuk.tradedoubler.com/click?p(259740)a(2916157)g(22579734)url(https://www.microsoft.com/store/apps/9nblggh40f2t?cid=youtube):
Views: 3905 3D4Medical
Thyroid gland by Dr. Prashant Thakur part 2/2
 
07:37
Thyroid gland by Dr Prashant Thakur, this (part 2) video contains histological diagram of thyroid gland that is follicular and parafollicular cells their shape filled with premature thyroxine hormone that is thyroglobulin along with type of hormone secreted from thyroid gland. Most important part of this video is mechanism of synthesis of thyroxine hormone that is step of thyroxine synthesis. Mechanism of thyroxine hormone synthesis include trapping of iodine with thyroglobulin results into formation of tri-idothyronin & a tetraidothyronin. Tri-idothyronin is four time potent than Tetraidothyronin because T3 has less affinity to bind with plasma proteins. T4 is otherwise known as Thyroxine, 90% secretion of T4 while remaining 10% is T3. #Dr Prashant Thakur #career hub #thyroid gland #thyroxine hormone #mechanism of synthesis of thyroxine hormone #cells of thyroid gland #hormones secreted from thyroid gland
Views: 2277 career hub
Functions of Thyroid Hormones
 
15:00
To assist introductory A&P students, this is the second part of my thyroid tutorials that addresses the functions of the thyroid gland, primarily thyroid hormones. This tutorial should be used in conjunction with the preceeding tutorial on thyroid hormones.
Views: 18203 Nichole Warwick