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Is Honey Good for Diabetes
 
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Is Honey Good for Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, Is honey good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). I have a 2 year old grandson. He is a joy and one of my favorite activities with him is to introduce him to some of the characters of even my childhood. Winnie the Pooh is one of his favorites. Pooh and his constant quest for honey with his friends in the Hundred Acre Wood amazes us still. Honey is 80% sugar and 20% water. Honey, if stored in air tight containers will never spoil. In fact there were sealed honey vats found in the tomb of King Tut that contained edible honey, despite over 2,000 years beneath the desert sands. Honey is the only food we know of that includes every substance necessary to sustain life. Honey is filled with things like enzymes, vitamins, minerals, and water. It’s also the only known food that contains pinocembrin, an antioxidant associated with helping our brain functions. Sounds like a great food doesn’t it? Well, for the person with diabetes we really need to focus on that first fact, 80% sugars. Some people think that since honey has all the good stuff in it and it is sweet, we can substitute it for sugar and be fine. And they may be right. A recent study looked at eating the same amount of honey and the same amount of table sugar in people with Type 2 diabetes. Those that ate honey did have a bigger spike 30 minutes after the meal. But then their blood sugar leveled out and remained lower than the table sugar eaters over the next 2 hours. Another study, however, showed an increase in A1C over an 8 week honey replacement program. But, in a very recent study (2014) conducted at the Department of Pharmacology, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, researchers looked at various other studies and conducted their own in laboratory rats to determine the effects of honey combined with metformin as part of the treatment plan for type 2. The results were rather encouraging. They concluded “These research findings reinforce the therapeutic prospects of using honey....as an adjunct to standard anti-diabetic drugs in the management of diabetes mellitus.” This study says the antioxidants and other nutrients in honey are extremely beneficial and may also help in the treatment of heart and other diseases that affect those with diabetes. So, is honey good for diabetes? Surprisingly yes. Even the Malaysian researchers were surprised when they stated, “This is a bit startling as honey is sweet and rich in sugars…” Now, don’t go out and eat a jar of honey. But it appears you can substitute it for sugar or add it to your oatmeal and actually help control your diabetes. Again, portions are the key. I hope this answered your question is honey good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 139879 Beat Your Diabetes
Is Peanut Butter Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Peanut Butter Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is peanut butter good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). I am sure we have all heard about who invented peanut butter, right? Yes, the ancient Aztecs developed mashed peanuts many many years ago. Oh, you thought I was going to say George Washington Carver? Well, he did “invent” something similar to what we call peanut butter today. Marcellus Gilmore Edson was awarded U.S. Patent 306,727 (for the manufacture of peanut butter) in 188. Carver was only 20 at the time. But probably closer to what we use today was developed by Dr John Harvey Kellogg (yes, the cereal guy) in 1895. But what we probably know more as peanut butter today was developed by a St Louis doctor who made a spread for this patients who needed protein but had trouble chewing. This spread was first introduced at the St Louis World’s Fair in 1904. Regardless of who invented it, I really like peanut butter. I personally am a Jif guy with all due respect to the Skippy and other brand lovers. Nutritionally peanut butter is a powerhouse. Two tablespoons of peanut butter contain approximately 12 grams of healthy poly- and monounsaturated fats, and nearly 8 grams of protein. Peanut butter also contains no cholesterol. The carbohydrate content of peanut butter is minimal, with less than 7 grams per serving. The glycemic index of peanut butter is a very low 14 which brings the glycemic load to absolutely ZERO. Peanut butter will not elevate your blood sugar and it also helps regulate your blood sugar with all the amino acids and proteins. When eaten with high-GI foods, peanut butter also helps lower the spike of blood sugar after eating. Carol S. Johnson, Ph.D., led a study at Arizona State University where researchers compared the blood-sugar levels of two meals. One meal consisted of a buttered bagel and juice. The second meal replaced the butter with peanut butter which resulted in a minimal rise and fall of blood sugar, while the buttered bagel raised the level considerably more. So YES, peanut butter is very good for diabetes. Eat up! Just be careful with the jelly! I hope this answered your question is peanut butter good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 39323 Beat Your Diabetes
Is Quaker Oats Good For Diabetes
 
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Is Quaker Oats or Oats in General Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is Quaker Oatmeal oats good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid) by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH This is kind of a tricky question. Because we can think we are talking about the same thing when we say Quaker Oats and Quaker Oatmeal, and in some ways we are but in other ways we aren’t. Oats are the whole grains or kernels that are the seed of Oat Grass, while oatmeal commonly refers to the cereal or porridge made by cooking processed oats in a hot liquid. Coarsely ground oat kernels are also called oatmeal while finely ground oats creates oat flour. Are you still with me? To further complicate the matter, oatmeal is actually made of oat groats, which are oat kernels from Oat Grass with the husks removed. So now that we are totally confused, let me see if I can clear the mud. Oats or oat groats, are the grain component in Oatmeal. Oats plus liquid and other food components make up oatmeal. Oatmeal has a low glycemic index. It has properties to help maintain glucose levels. We know that those of us with diabetes like those types of foods. Oatmeal can also promote heart health. Oatmeal is also high in fiber and aids in digestion. So it sounds like oatmeal is a great breakfast choice for those with diabetes. But wait, as Robb Wolf put it, “Does anyone remember the product Wilford Brimley was the spokesperson for years ago? Right, Quaker Oatmeal. Does anyone know what Wilford Brimley now promotes? Diabetes testing supplies.“ What he meant by that is be careful when choosing Oatmeal. Quaker Old Fashion Oats are a fine choice for breakfast. Cook them up, add a little skim milk and cinnamon and who wee, you got a great start to your day. High in fiber, low is sugar, aid in digestion with a low glycemic impact, wonderful. Where you need to be careful is with some types of Quaker Oatmeal. Quaker has oatmeal flavors such “Maple and Brown Sugar” and “Cinnamon Roll” which are packed with sugar and very high in carbs. So, to make a complicated answer out of what seemed at first to be an easy question, Quaker Oats can be a fantastic choice for those with diabetes. Most Quaker Oatmeals, do not! The average sugar content in Quaker Instant Oatmeal is about 12 grams. Buy Quaker Old Fashion Oats and make your own oatmeal. I hope this answered your question is Quaker Oatmeal oats good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 157031 Beat Your Diabetes
Is Drinking Lots of Water Good For Diabetes?
 
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Can drinking a lot of water help me with my diabetes? Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is drinking lots of water good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). If you have had diabetes for any period of time, you know that when your blood sugar is elevated, you get thirsty. As a matter of fact, one of the first signs you probably had with diabetes was a tremendous thirst and frequent urination. Without getting uber-technical, basically when your blood sugar is up, your body can no longer absorb water into its cells. This causes your body to dump the water and you to drink more to try and replenish your dehydrating cells. So there are times that we must drink lots of water to help us deal with our diabetes. But what about those times when our blood sugars are pretty good, is it still ok to drink lots of water? I have heard my whole life, that if you wait until you get thirsty to get something to drink, you have waited too long and you are already starting to dehydrate. That old saying was backed up recently by Dr James Pendargast. He suggest that those with diabetes drink water throughout the day whether thirsty or not. During the summer, it is even good to add a small amount of salt in the water, or a sugar free sports packet to help replace what is lost through urine and sweat. Too much water without a small amount of salt can cause sodium levels in the body to dip to dangerously low levels. A new study suggests that those with diabetes should have 1cc of water for every calorie eaten throughout the day. I’ve done the math for you, so don’t worry. If you have 2000 calories in a day, you should be drinking 8.5 cups of water as well. The ratio is about 4.25 cups per thousand calories, give or take a cc. So is drinking lots of water good for diabetes? Depends on your definition of a lot, but if it’s over 8 cups per day, then yes it is. Water is a natural cleanser for kidneys for those with diabetes, it helps flush some of the sugar from our bodies and helps regulate our blood sugar. I hope this answered your question is drinking lots of water good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 42403 Beat Your Diabetes
Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetes
 
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Are Sweet Potatoes Good or Bad for Diabetes? Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Titus Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and a type2 diabetic. Today I'm going to answer the question, are yams good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes shopping list, 'The Diabetes Shopping List: Foods to Eat and Foods to Avoid' by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Is it a sweet potato or a yam? Well, there is a lot of confusion in the United States about just that question. What you have called yams your entire life is probably just an orange sweet potato. According to the North Carolina Sweet Potato Commission, true yams come from the Caribbean and while they may look similar to the sweet potato, there are differences including taste, content of sugars and are very low in beta carotene. So for the purposes of the question, we will be talking about those orange root vegetables that you may call yams, but are truly sweet potatoes. The name itself doesn’t sound like it would be good for diabetes does it? Sweet implies sugar which is an enemy to those of us who’s body doesn’t produce enough insulin. So at first glance we might immediately say that sweet potatoes can’t be good for diabetics. But don’t judge a food by its name. Sweet potatoes are actually lower in carbs and sugar than say a russet or white potato. The glycemic impact on post meal blood sugar is minimal if eaten in moderation and carefully prepared. This mainly because sweet potatoes are higher in fiber, which helps negate the sugars or carbohydrates. In 2014, PubMed studied the effects on sweet potatoes on those with Type 2 diabetes. The study was small, only 140 participants who took 4 grams of sweet potatoes in capsule form each day with no difference in their normal menu. The result of the study was that after the study, the A1C of the group was lowered by 0.3%. The study concluded that there was insufficient evidence to show that the sweet potato was able to help control blood sugar in Type 2 diabetics. So, are sweet potatoes good for diabetes? Good? Yes. In choices of vegetables for your diabetic diet the sweet potato is an excellent choice. They are high in fiber and low in sugar. Some have even called them a “super food” because they are an excellent source Vitamin A and C. They are also a great source for magnesium, potassium, vitamins B1 and B2 as well as niacin. However, be careful in your thoughts of sweet potatoes being good. They truly a great food, but when items like brown sugar, marshmallows and syrup are added to them for baking, their benefits are negated. I hope this answered your question if yams good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes shopping list by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 14396 Beat Your Diabetes
Is Rye Bread Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Rye Bread Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is rye bread good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid) by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH If you have watched any of our other videos, you know when you see a starchy food like any bread, pasta, grain, etc. we are talking about carbohydrates. So I want to give you just a brief lesson on how carbohydrates affect those with diabetes before we answer the question about rye bread. I searched several books and sites to find a concise, accurate discussion on this topic. The Harvard School of Public Health had a great article on the topic, here is a portion of it. “When people eat a food containing carbohydrates, the digestive system breaks down the digestible ones into sugar, which enters the blood. As blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that prompts cells to absorb blood sugar for energy or storage. As cells absorb blood sugar, levels in the bloodstream begin to fall. When this happens, the pancreas start making glucagon, a hormone that signals the liver to start releasing stored sugar. This interplay of insulin and glucagon ensure that cells throughout the body, and especially in the brain, have a steady supply of blood sugar. Carbohydrate metabolism is important in the development of type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the body can’t make enough insulin or can’t properly use the insulin it makes.” So you see why carbs are so important. What we are looking for are foods low in carbs OR in carbs that our body doesn’t digest, I call these pass through carbs. The fiber content in whole grains “pass through” are not digested and help keep you regular. So, what about rye bread? Rye is a cereal. It resembles wheat but is longer and different in color. It is difficult to separate the germ and bran from the endosperm of rye. This makes most rye bread “whole grain” and results in a large quantity of nutrients, in contrast to refined wheat flour. Whether rye bread is good for you depends on the actual ingredients. Rye is a very healthy and nutritious cereal grain packed full of nutrients and health benefits. It is a grain similar to wheat, and like wheat, whole grain rye is much healthier than refined. Is rye bread good for diabetes? Yes it, just be sure to look at the ingredients. Whole grain rye bread is very low in carbs with virtually zero sugars. I hope this answered your question rye bread good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 17522 Beat Your Diabetes
Is Watermelon Good For Diabetes
 
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Is Watermelon Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and a I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is watermelon good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid) by clicking the link here: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH I can say without any reservation that, to me, there is nothing better on a hot summer day than an ice cold slice of watermelon. Ever since my childhood watermelon has been sort of a comfort food for me. As a child I would see how far I could spit the seeds as the “juice” of that melon ran down my chin and made my t shirt a little bit pink. When I was first diagnosed with diabetes, a friend of mine told me I had to say “goodbye” to my old friend the watermelon. Why? He said it was a sweet fruit and those with diabetes can’t have sweet things. My heart sank. That was until I talked with my doctor. Boy was my friend wrong! According to my doctor, watermelon was a great food for me to eat. Watermelon contains natural sugar and carbohydrates. Watermelon actually has fewer calories than most fruit and is packed with a wide array of nutrients. Another benefit of watermelon is that is has a lot water in it! This makes one feel much fuller much faster as does the high fiber content. There is actually very little sugar in watermelon which means it has very little impact on blood glucose levels. As a matter of fact, my doctor told me watermelon would actually HELP with my diabetes. How? 1. It contains a great deal of nutritional value. Watermelon is rich in Vitamins A, C, B1 and B6. It has loads of potassium and magnesium. It is fat free and cholesterol free! 2. It contains lycopene. Watermelon is perfect for those with diabetes because it is rich in lycopene which is a potent antioxidant. 3. It is full of amino acids. Several studies have confirmed that since watermelon contains loads of amino acid called L-citrulline, it plays a big role in preventing high blood pressure. So, is watermelon good for diabetes? Well, if you don’t know by now you haven’t really been listening. Watermelon may well be one of the best foods you can eat as a diabetic. Don’t go overboard and eat the whole thing at once, but enjoy a couple of slices and know you are actually helping your body with that sweet, delicious fruit. I hope this answered your question is watermelon good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book by clicking the link here: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 52522 Beat Your Diabetes
Are Peanuts Good For Diabetes
 
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Are Peanuts Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, are peanuts good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid) by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Now don’t think I am crazy, but I have great memories about peanuts. My grandpa and I would go to town sometimes and we would get an ice cold bottle, an actual glass bottle, of Coca Cola, a package of peanuts, drink about ¼ of the bottle, then pour the peanuts right in there with Coke and eat them out of the bottle. If you ever did that, please comment below so I don’t feel alone. Alright, time for another quick 1 question quiz. True or False: Peanuts are nuts. Sounds like a trick question doesn’t it? The answer is False. While “nut” is in their name, peanuts are in fact legumes. Peanuts actually grow underground, as opposed to nuts like walnuts, almonds, etc. that grow on trees (and are sometimes referred to as "tree nuts"). Peanuts, along with beans and peas, belong to the single plant family, Leguminosae. Research released recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that eating nuts (including peanuts) substantially lowers the likelihood of developing Type 2 diabetes. According to a study conducted by Dr. Rui Jiang from the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, eating 30 grams of nuts or peanuts per day, five times a week, can reduce the risk of Type 2 diabetes by 33% without significant weight gain. As I have discussed before, glycemic index of a food indicates how quickly carbs in food will turn into sugar in your body. Peanuts have a very low GI. At 26-28% protein, Peanuts are nature’s powerhouse, providing 12% of the daily-recommended protein allowance per serving which is more than eggs, dairy and many cuts of meat. They are a healthy source of poly and monounsaturated fats, essential vitamins, minerals and fiber and are low in saturated fats. So, are peanuts good for diabetes? Yes they are. Peanuts are a great source of energy chocked full of good stuff for your body. A handful of peanuts everyday will give you a boost like you wouldn’t believe. I hope this answered your question are peanuts good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 32211 Beat Your Diabetes
Is Cheese Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Cheese Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is cheese good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). Well, where do I start with this one? Cheese? How many different types of cheese are there? Well, cheese.com, yes there is a website devoted to just cheese, lists 1,777 different cheeses. If I were to try and answer this question for each one, well, I am not going to answer this question for each one. I will stick to cheeses in general. The great thing about cheese, is that it has a glycemic and glycemic load of zero. Well, actually it has never truly been calculated. That’s because an ounce of cheddar cheese has 0.4 grams of carbs. To calculate the GI of a food, it is based on consuming enough of that food to get 50 grams of carbs. For the GI to actually be calculated, someone would have to eat 7.8 pounds before the actual test could be conducted. If anyone would like to volunteer for that, you could probably do a test for a laxative research firm at the same time. So cheese has a GI and GL of zero, which means you can eat off it you want, right? Wrong, there are other things in cheese that those of us with diabetes need to be careful of. Namely, fat content. When choosing a cheese it is important to look at how much fat is contained. Basically fat and protein are the main contribution cheese brings to the diabetes table (along with calcium of course) Choosing low fat cheeses, those made from skim or 2% milk are the best choices. Cottage cheese made from skim milk has only 2.2 grams of fat per service. Compare that with regular cottage cheese which has almost 5 times the amount of fat. Mozzarella isn’t a bad choice. Generally speaking the softer cheeses are lower in fat content. Regardless of what cheese you like, a serving or 2 of cheese per day is not going to raise your blood sugar. But look for the low fat variety of your favorite cheese. They really are pretty good. Is cheese good for diabetes? Yes it is. BUT, beware of processed cheeses. While they may be lower in fat than many cheese products, many of them contain carbs in the form of sugar. These “cheeses” can have an impact on your blood sugar. I hope this answered your question is cheese good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 42229 Beat Your Diabetes
Is Yogurt Good for Diabetes
 
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Is Yogurt Good or Bad for Diabetes? Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Titus Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and a type2 diabetic. Today I'm going to answer the question, is yogurt good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes shopping list, 'The Diabetes Shopping List: Foods to Eat and Foods to Avoid' by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH If you were to walk through your local grocery store and stop by the “yogurt aisle” you might be overwhelmed. An array of colors, sizes and types that could send your head spinning: Greek. Goat’s Milk. Fruit at the bottom. Lowfat, nonfat, full fat Icelandic Organic Soy The list goes on and on. Yogurt is one of the oldest and most popular fermented foods in the world. Wait, did I say fermented? Yes I did. Yogurt is produced by bacterial fermentation of milk. “Yogurt cultures” specifically “Lactobacillus delbrueckii bulgaricus & Streptococcus thermophiles” ….we will just call them yogurt cultures, cause the milk to ferment by converting lactose into lactic acid, which thickens the milk and gives it the tangy taste characteristic of yogurt. In November, 2014 a study published in the BioMed Central Journal focused on the relationship between yogurt and diabetes. The study was conducted under the direction of Dr. Frank Hu, a professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard. The study was massive including 460,000 subjects. The results showed that one serving of yogurt per day showed an 18% decrease in the development of Type 2 diabetes. While the study was aimed at whether or not yogurt could prevent Type 2 diabetes, Hu also explained that preventative aspects were also studied. "Yogurt is not magic for curing or preventing diabetes," Hu said in an interview with WebMD. "That's the bottom line and the message we want to convey to our consumers, that we have to pay attention to our diet pattern. There is no replacement for an overall healthy diet and maintaining [a healthy] body weight." Another interesting aspect of the study was that different types of dairy was used as the basis for daily intake, but yogurt seemed to be the only dairy that showed any significant effect. Exactly how the yogurt may help is not certain. Many experts felt the probiotics in yogurt ("good" bacteria) were the main reason for the beneficial outcomes. The take-home message, Hu said, is that more study is needed, but that yogurt seems to have a place in a healthy diet. So, is yogurt good for diabetes? Yes and no. Yogurt is certainly a healthy choice but only if you are careful what type of yogurt you choose. Plain Greek yogurt is the best choice having only about 4 grams of sugar per 6 ounce serving. Some flavored yogurts can have as much as 29 grams of sugar per 6 ounce serving. You need to read the labels to see if the sugar content is going to have more of a negative effect on your body than the positive gains of the probiotics. I hope this answered your question if yogurt is good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes shopping list by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 21464 Beat Your Diabetes
Are Lemons Good For Diabetes?
 
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Are Lemons Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, are lemons good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). I am not a fan of sitting down and eating a lemon. I don’t do sour very well. But I love adding a lemon wedge to water or tea. A little lemon juice is great on fish. There are several ways to enjoy lemons without actually eating the lemon. But those of us with diabetes there is at least a glimpse of a new benefit that was uncovered back in 2006 by researcher Un Ju Jung. Jung identified 2 flavonoids that are present in lemons, hesperidin and naringin. These flavonoids are thought to be why some cultures us lemons for medicinal purposes. The theory was that they helped with lipid and glucose control. This would aid in heart health as well as dibetes control. The study was conducted on mice with diabetes. They were given the 2 flavonoids. The results of his study suggests that hesperidin and naringin are beneficial for improving hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia in type-2 diabetic animals by partly regulating the fatty acid and cholesterol metabolism and affecting the gene expression of glucose-regulating enzymes. In other words, the flavonoids helped lower lipids and blood sugar in mice. These results back up a similar study conducted in 1998 in Japan. But the results have not truly been replicated in humans. A 2015 meta-analysis in Primary Care Diabetes found that eating citrus fruits didn't seem to lower the risk of type 2 diabetes. Citrus fruits do contain flavonoids, naringin, and hesperidin, that have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant effects, says a 2014 study in Advances in Nutrition. However, there's still not a whole lot of research into these compounds and their use in treating diabetes in humans. But, The American Diabetes Association includes lemons on their list of superfoods due to soluble fiber and the high amount of vitamin C. Both soluble fiber and vitamin C can benefit people with diabetes. Lemons also have a low glycemic index, and some studies even show that lemon may lower the glycemic index of other foods. So, are lemons good for diabetes? I will give this one a yes. They are proven to at least help us control our blood sugar to a certain extent and more research continues on the flavonoid factor. I hope this answered your question are lemons good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 49761 Beat Your Diabetes
Is Eggplant Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Eggplant Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is eggplant good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). Caution, you will not believe that this item is not a vegetable. I got into very interesting discussion over my video about green peas, by the way, did you know the green pea is a fruit? Guess what? So is the eggplant. Yepp! It is on the list of non-starchy vegetables, but the eggplant, like the green pea AND the tomato is a fruit. As a matter of fact, it is related to the tomato. Eggplant is said to cause insanity in folklore. So be careful. AND, not only is a fruit, it is now a color as well. Do a search for yourself, eggplant is actually a color! It is also known as an aubergine in parts of the world, especially in Britain. But why eggplant? The theory is that back in the 1700’s the eggplant variety brought to America was smaller and whitish yellow. Thus, an plant that looked like an egg. There are still small white varieties around today. Nutritionally, the eggplant is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Vitamin K and B6, Thiamin, Folate, Potassium and Manganese, and the eggplant is a very good source of Dietary Fiber. 1 cup of eggplant has just 33 calories and only 8 grams of carbs with 2 of those being dietary fiber. The GI of the eggplant is only 15. This makes the GL Zero! So are eggplants good for diabetes? Yes! Eggplant is a very good choice for your plate if you have diabetes. I did a search for eggplant recipes and there are very many good ones. I never knew how versatile this fruit was. People grill them, stuff them, roast them, they are put in soups and stews and on kabobs, and used in curries and stir-fries. Just be careful in your preparation. Just because eggplant is good for diabetes, doesn’t mean eggplant parmesan is. And if you win any money on knowing that eggplant is a fruit, consider giving me a gratuity. I hope this answered your question is eggplant good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 10332 Beat Your Diabetes
Why is My Blood Sugar So High In The Morning
 
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Get my prediabetes and diabetes type 2 management guide here to control your blood sugar better https://goo.gl/z7bR6y Morning blood sugar readings can sometimes be all over the place. Depending on what you had for dinner or what snacks you had during the evening. What time you took your medicine can play a factor as well. But if you have consistently high blood glucose readings every morning, it could be one of three reasons that we are going to discuss in this video. DAWN PHENOMENON Researchers feel the most common reason for high blood glucose levels in the morning is the dawn phenomenon. The glucose is going up from sources other than digested food. Some of it is produced by the liver from stored starch and fatty acids. Livers that produce too much glucose are one of the main ways diabetes causes high blood glucose levels. Other organs also produce small amounts of glucose. This is called “gluconeogenesis” for those of you who like the technical stuff. Organs produce glucose to keep blood glucose from going too low at night or other times of not eating. From about 2 AM to 8 AM, most people’s bodies produce hormones, including cortisol, glucagon, and epinephrine. All these hormones increase insulin resistance and tell the liver to make more glucose. The idea is to get you enough glucose to get out of bed and start the day. Everyone has a dawn phenomenon. Otherwise they’d be too weak to get breakfast. But in people without diabetes, insulin levels also increase to handle the extra glucose. People with diabetes can’t increase insulin levels that much, so their early morning blood glucose levels can rise dramatically. Experts disagree on how many people have a dawn phenomenon. Estimates range from 3% to 50% of Type 2s and from 25% to 50% of Type 1s. Is dawn phenomenon a serious problem? It can be serious. According to the American Diabetes Association, “Some people with dawn phenomenon find that their glucose continues to rise until they eat in the morning. For others, levels will settle down a few hours after waking, regardless of whether or not they eat.” According to columnist Wil Dubois, the higher your A1C, the more likely you are to have a significant dawn phenomenon. It could be that spending a number of hours each morning out of control is having a significant effect on your overall control. Some people have high glucose levels in the morning because their medicines wear off overnight. This could be true of medicines like insulin, and metformin. If you are taking any long-acting medicine, consider asking your doctor about changing meds, doses, or times THE SOMOGYI EFFECT In some cases, medicine can be too strong. If your glucose goes too low in the night, you could have a rebound high in the morning. This is called the Somogyi effect. If you are waking up high and are suffering pounding headaches, or find your sheets sweat-soaked, the odds are you are having lows in your sleep…You need to visit with your doctor about taking less meds. According to Dubois, the new insulins are much less likely to cause a Somogyi reaction. But because of cost, people are going back to NPH insulin. NPH is cheaper, shorter-acting, and more likely to cause a low, leading to a rebound high in the morning. WANING INSULIN If you take insulin and have been experiencing high blood sugar in the morning, your insulin may simply be wearing off too soon. If this is the case, your doctor can adjust your dosage or change what time you are taking the insulin to prevent high glucose levels. Pinpointing the Cause for Effective Treatment If your blood sugar is fairly even when you go to bed and at 3 a.m. but is higher in the morning, you are probably experiencing dawn phenomenon. If your blood sugar is low at 3 a.m., but high in the morning, you probably suffer from the Somogyi effect. If your blood sugar is elevated at 3 a.m. and then higher still in the morning, you probably have waning insulin. Even if you’ve identified the reason behind your high morning number, never attempt to correct it on your own. Instead, talk with your doctor. Together, you can find a treatment plan that gets you back on track in the morning. How can this situation be corrected? Once you and your doctor determine how your blood sugar levels are behaving at night, he or she can advise you about the changes you need to make to better control them. -Changing the time you take the long-acting insulin in the evening so that its peak action occurs when your blood sugars start rising -Changing the type of insulin you take in the evening -Taking extra insulin overnight -Eating a lighter breakfast -Increasing your morning dose of insulin -Switching to an insulin pump, which can be programmed to release additional insulin in the morning
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Is Coffee Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Coffee Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is coffee good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). Americans consume 7.3 billion gallons of coffee each year. Surprisingly that is the 4th most consumed beverage annually in the US. Number 1? Soft drinks. No 2? Not so soft drinks. There are several studies that have been conducted over years that have concluded that those who are regular coffee drinkers have a significantly lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Yet, there are also many studies that show that those with Type 2 diabetes have trouble controlling their blood sugar if they are regular coffee drinkers. This doesn’t seem to make sense. Well, what do you think of when you think coffee? Most of you just thought or even said, “caffeine.” Researchers thought the same thing recently when they decided to study the effects of caffeine on those with type 2 diabetes, not just coffee. They found that it is, in fact, the caffeine that causes the inability in many to control their blood sugar. The study was conducted by Dr James Lane who found that after given caffeine pills with meals, those with diabetes saw an 8% increase in their blood sugar compared to times they were given a placebo. Lane remarked this is a significant rise. But how can caffeine keep you from developing diabetes, and also worsen the symptoms for those with diabetes? It can’t. And Harvard researcher, Dr Rob Van Dam says, it is not the caffeine in coffee that is preventing some from developing diabetes. In fact, van Dam says, it is possible that decaf coffee may be able to help people with diabetes keep their blood sugar under control, whereas regular coffee has a damaging effect on blood sugar. But that has yet to be studied. Regardless of the reason, there is apparently something in coffee that can help prevent or possibly control diabetes. But another fact is apparent, it is not caffeine. So, is coffee good for diabetes? Well, no it is not. Regular coffee is certainly not good for diabetes period. And Dr James Lane advises that those with diabetes not drink any kind of coffee. There is not enough research to back a claim that decaf coffee will help control blood sugar. I hope this answered your question is coffee good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Is Whole Wheat Bread Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Whole Wheat Bread Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is whole wheat bread good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). As a backdrop to this video, you may want to look at our videos on “Rye Bread and Diabetes” and “Wheat and Diabetes” for reference material. When we talk about “whole wheat” we are basically saying that the whole grain of wheat is being used to make something. The grain is made up of 3 parts, the endosperm, the germ and the bran. The endosperm makes up about 83 percent of each kernel. The bran makes up about 14.5% and the germ 2.5%. Breads, crackers, pasta, flour, cereal, condiments, beer, just a short list of how we use wheat. It is hard to find processed foods without some type of wheat product in it. Wheat has been around since the cradle of civilization. Wheat is not bad, but has changed. The endosperm is the starchy part of wheat. When white flour is made, the endosperm is all of the grain that is used. So much of the fiber and nutrients are lost because the bran and germ house the bulk of that material. So because whole wheat bread has all this stuff in tact it must be better for you than white bread, right? Not exactly. If you have seen many of our videos, you know I am a firm believer in the glycemic load as a measure for whether or not a food might be good or bad for diabetes. Let’s compare whole wheat with white bread on that basis. Whole wheat has a GI of 69 and GL of 9. Both are at the upper level of low on the scales. White bread has a GI of 73 and GL of 10. Not a great deal of difference is there? The main difference is seen in whole GRAIN bread where the GI is 51 and the GL is 7. So is whole wheat bread good for diabetes? It is, but not as good as whole grain bread and not really any worse than white bread. Breads, like many other foods, must be eaten in moderation. I hope this answered your question is whole wheat bread good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Is Tuna Good For Diabetes
 
02:49
Is Tuna Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is tuna good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). I am a big fish lover. I like to catch fish, eat fish, I even make fishing lures as a hobby. So when this topic came across my desk, I was excited. I have never fished for tuna, but I love researching fish. As a general rule, seafood is a great choice for those of us with diabetes. There are several reasons for this: Most seafood is very low in the unhealthy saturated fats. What fats are in fish is unsaturated. Seafood is a great natural source of omega3 fatty acids. Seafood is loaded with good protein. There are no carbs in seafood, a huge plus for those of us with diabetes. As far as tuna specifically, it is also a great source for Vitamin D. But we need to be careful when choosing tuna at the grocery store. Unless you live where you can get tuna fresh, you are going to have to buy canned tuna and not all cans are alike. It is important that you look for tuna packed in water if possible. Why? Because the other alternative is packed in oil which can add fat and calories to the tuna. We must also be careful in our thoughts that tuna and tuna salad are the same. They are not. Most tuna salads add either mayonnaise or salad dressing that will add a lot of fat and calories. The good thing, however, is that mayonnaise is low in carbs. So it is a balancing act. Adding a little bit of mayo to your tuna is ok, just be careful about adding too much and make a wise choice if you are going to make a sandwich with it. The tuna itself is a great choice, just be careful what you add to it or how you prepare it. There are many ways to enjoy tuna. I like mine drained of the water and little bit of sriracha. There are literally thousands of tuna recipes out there that can be diabetes friendly. So, yes, tuna is a very good choice for someone with diabetes. I hope this answered your question is tuna good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Is Dark Chocolate Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Dark Chocolate Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is dark chocolate good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). Before we get going, I want you to remember, we are talking about dark chocolate and not milk chocolate, and there is a huge difference. What if you saw a headline in the newspaper saying that people with diabetes should eat chocolate daily to help reduce their blood glucose levels and insulin dependency? Well, a group of researchers from the University of Hull and the Hull York Medical School have found that dark chocolate has significant health benefits for people with Type 2 diabetes. A 2010 study conducted by Steve Atkin, Professor of Diabetes and Endocrinology, concluded that HDL or ‘good’ cholesterol is improved and overall cholesterol balance is enhanced when patients consume 45g of dark chocolate each day. This is the first study of its kind to report on the effects of giving chocolate to individuals with Type 2 diabetes over a period of 16 weeks. Dark chocolate containing 85% cocoa solids was given to one group with a placebo which contained no cocoa solids but was dyed the same color as the dark chocolate was given to another group. The patients were given instructions to eat no other chocolate, but to otherwise eat their normal diet. According to Atkin, “People with Type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to develop cardiovascular disease and since one of the main contributory factors to heart disease is a low level of HDL or ‘good’ cholesterol, the findings that dark chocolate can improve this, means the results of this study are hugely significant.” He continues: “Chocolate with a high cocoa content should be included in the diet of individuals with Type 2 diabetes as part of a sensible, balanced approach to diet and lifestyle. This study demonstrates that it can offer a potential reduction in cardiovascular risk without detrimental risks on weight, insulin resistance or glycemic control.” Who would’ve thought that dark chocolate could be helpful to those of us with diabetes? My research also found a very interesting fact about dark chocolate. It has a very low GI of 23 and a very low GL of 5. So, is dark chocolate good for diabetes? Surprisingly, yes it is! But, if you have never had dark chocolate before, don’t expect it to taste like a Hershey bar. Dark chocolate is a somewhat bitter. Also, this study was conducted with a pretty high quality dark chocolate. 85% cocoa solids is very high and can be expensive. Most commercial dark chocolate, Dove’s for example, is about 71% cocoa solids. The higher the cocoa content, the better. I hope this answered your question is dark chocolate good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Are Carrots Good For Diabetes?
 
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Are Carrots Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, are carrots good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). I cannot even say the word carrot without thinking of that waskily wabbit Bugs Bunny. The funny thing is non-cartoon rabbits eat mostly hay and green leafy things. If you give a rabbit an entire carrot with leaves still intact, it will disregard the root and eat just the top. It'll be like, "What's this orange thing?” The science is pretty sound that carrots, by virtue of their heavy dose of Vitamin A (in the form of beta carotene), are good for your eye health. A 1998 Johns Hopkins study, as reported by the New York Times, even found that supplemental pills could reverse poor vision among those with a Vitamin A deficiency. But as John Stolarczyk knows all too well as curator of the World Carrot Museum, the truth has been stretched into a pervasive myth that carrots hold within a super-vegetable power: improving your night-time vision. But carrots cannot help you see better in the dark any more than eating blueberries will turn you blue. The carrot is a root vegetable. Most people love the orange colored taproot but some even like the greens that grow above ground. Carrots also come in purple, black, red, white, and yellow varieties. Carrots are very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Thiamin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate and Manganese, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K and Potassium. A cup of raw carrots will yield 52 calories, 12 carbs and 6 grams of sugar. Depending on which chart you look at carrots have a high GI at 71 or a low GI at 43. The problem is carrots fall into 2 different aspects that can cause the GI to vary greatly. A raw carrot has a higher GI than a cooked carrot, but a lower GI than a canned carrot. Also, some GI scales still have the carrot a bit high because of the standard used to measure 100. Some of the GI scales have sugar at 100 while others have used bread. For my purposes, the GI of the carrot is 45 and the GL is 6. So are carrots good for diabetes? Yes they are. One of my favorite snacks are those little baby carrots. Put them on salads, in soup or stews. Carrots will be a good addition to your diet. I hope this answered your question are carrots good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book by clicking the link in the description box below. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Are Dates Good For Diabetes?
 
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Are Dates Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, are dates good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). Corny joke alert! I can only assume this question is about the fruit and not the act of going out with a companion for a meal and perhaps a movie. A product of the date palm this delicious fruit has been cultivated since approximately 6000 B.C. The date is one of the sweetest fruits in existence and comes in many different varieties. Dates are versatile in that they can be tasty eaten fresh or dried. Dates are loaded with anti-oxidants and are fat free and cholesterol free, which is good for any health-conscious individual, not just for those with diabetes. Several necessary minerals are also found in dates, such as calcium, potassium, manganese and magnesium. Prevention Magazine suggests eating dates straight from the bag, adding them to salads or smoothies, or chopping them and eating with oatmeal. But, a 1 cup of serving of dates contains about 415 calories and nearly 95 g sugar, as well as 110 g carbohydrates. Dates have a low GI. Depending on the type their GI ranges from 35-50 with an average of 42. The average glycemic load of dates is 18. This is not a bad GL, it does fall within the mid-range. Dates contain 3 types of sugar (Fructose, glucose and sucrose) that are capable of giving an extra burst of energy on those lethargic days. Dates are also cholesterol and fat free and contain a good amount of dietary fiber. A 2010 study at King Saud University in Riyadh concluded that, “The hypoglycemic effect of date seed extract combined with insulin, decreases the blood glucose level significantly toward normal when compared to the effect of insulin administered as a single drug for treatment of diabetes.” This study shows the date can be valuable in lowering blood sugars in conjunction with diabetes meds. One problem with diabetes is neuropathy. You know what I mean, tingling or numbness in your feet? It is caused by nerve damage due to diabetes. A 2011 study at the Neuroscience Research Center, Kerman Medical University found that a compound found in dates may be considered as a potential preventative approach for peripheral diabetic neuropathy. So are dates good for diabetes? I must admit I almost said no to this one. But the more I researched, the more I learned that this is an excellent choice to add to your diabetic diet. I would suggest them as a snack. Use them as an energy boost or just a snack when watching TV. I hope this answered your question are dates good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Is Coconut Water Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Coconut Water Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is coconut water good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid) and other tips to better manage your blood sugar to avoid complications. Let me state right up front I am not a fan of the coconut. I have stated this before and my opinion hasn’t changed. One of my biggest fears in life would to be on one of those survivor type TV shows on an island with nothing but coconut to eat. I have never liked the taste or texture, even the smell makes me nauseous. So I would never even consider coconut water as a way to hydrate. But, as I always try my best to do, I went into the research for this video with an open mind. The nutritional breakdown of coconut water is interesting: 46 calories 0.5 grams of fat 9 grams of carbohydrate 3 grams of fiber 2 grams of protein 252 milligrams of sodium 600 milligrams of potassium Coconut water is a relatively low cal/low carb beverage. It also contains a fair amount of sodium and potassium as well as magnesium, calcium, and phosphate. Collectively, these minerals are known as electrolytes. Instead of sugary sports drinks, coconut water has become an all-natural way to replenish electrolytes for many athletes and those who work out regularly. But is it good for diabetes? Pure coconut water is sterile, thus it is safe. It contains very little in carbs but most of those carbs come from sugar. The GI of coconut water is 3, the glycemic load is zero. Therefore as little potential to raise your blood sugar. So yes, coconut water is good for diabetes. BUT, you must read labels on this one. If you choose to try coconut water make sure you are getting pure coconut water. 100% natural and 100% pure coconut water are not the same thing. Sugar is natural. So if a company decides to add sugar to the water to make it taste better, it is 100% natural, but not 100% pure coconut water. I hope this answered your question is coconut water good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 166558 Beat Your Diabetes
Is Grapefruit Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Grapefruit Good For DiabetesDownload Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is grapefruit good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). Headlines in California 2 short years ago touted that grapefruit was the key to weight loss and the cure for diabetes. They touted scientific proof that the grapefruit diet fad of the 80’s now has scientific backing. The 2014 study, conducted at UC-Berkeley, one group of mice an antioxidant called naringin, a bioactive compound in grapefruit juice that has been identified as a key agent in weight loss. Another group of mice got the prescription drug metformin, the most common glucose-lowering drug prescribed for patients with Type 2 diabetes. Researcher Professor Joseph Napoli said: "The grapefruit juice lowered blood glucose to the same degree as metformin. That means a natural fruit drink lowered glucose levels as effectively as a prescription drug." Sounds great doesn’t it? I mean grapefruit juice is much cheaper than metformin, so let’s all throw our drugs out and move to Florida! But wait a minute. There was a slight problem with the study. NONE of the mice actually had diabetes! AND, the study was funded by the California Grapefruit Growers Cooperative. So, let’s take a look at the grapefruit and it’s juice to see how it really affects those of us with diabetes and if or not it is a good choice to add to our diet. If you were to look at the nutritional values of a grapefruit, the 1 thing that will leap off the page is that contains 142% of the recommended daily allowance of Vitamin C. I would say that is a lot. It also packs a pretty good punch with Vitamin A. You will also get some potassium, calcium and iron. What you won’t get is sugar, fat, cholesterol or sodium. And a whole cup of grapefruit sections with the juice is only 69 calories. The best news? Grapefruit has a GL of 4. So, even though I put very little stock in the UCB study about grapefruit being better than metformin in helping control diabetes, it is a great fruit to add to your diet. One quick word about grapefruit juice. Most of them are great. But be careful that you are getting 100% grapefruit juice and not a blend of juices or something with a bunch of additives. Those products can contain sugars and other ingredients that aren’t as diabetes friendly as the real thing. I hope this answered your question is grapefruit good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 7638 Beat Your Diabetes
Is Stevia Good For Diabetes
 
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Is Stevia Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is stevia good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid) by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Stevia is actually a plant naturally grown in Brazil and Paraguay. It is now being grown in many other countries with China now being the largest export of the sweetener derived from the plant. The plant is in the same family as chrysanthemums and sunflowers. The extract taken from the stevia plant has been used for many years as a sweetener, but was actually banned in the United States in 1991 because it was thought to cause cancer. The ban was lifted in 1995, but the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allowed stevia to be imported and sold as a food supplement, but not as a sweetener. In December 2008, the FDA declared stevia Generally Regarded As Safe. Since then the market has been flooded with “stevia” sugar substitutes. Just some of the “brand” names of stevia are: Stevia in the Raw Truvia PureVia Sweet Leaf WalMart has their own “brand” Great Value Stevia Only Sweet And there are plenty of “Generic” stevia based sweeteners available. Stevia extract is 250-300 times sweeter than table sugar. Stevia is generally accepted as a good sugar substitute. A 2003 study by Søren Gregersen found that stevioside reduces postprandial blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetic patients, indicating beneficial effects on the glucose metabolism. Stevioside may be advantageous in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Postbrandial simply means the blood glucose levels after eating a meal. A 2012 study by Naveen Shivanna found that the active ingredients in stevia not only had a positive impact on blood glucose levels, but was found to be an anti-oxidant and had liver protection properties. So, is stevia good for diabetes? My answer is yes. But I do feel you need to read the labels before you buy. Some forms of stevia sold in the US is all natural, but is it all stevia? Others have additives in them to promote longer shelf life. Be sure to read the label to ensure you are getting an all-natural, all stevia sweetener. I hope this answered your question is Stevia good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 23652 Beat Your Diabetes
Are Raisins Good For Diabetes
 
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Are Raisins Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, are raisins good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid) by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH If you research raisins, you are going get a myriad of answers concerning how those with diabetes should react to them. Everything from don’t even look at them, to eat all you want. The answer probably lies somewhere in between. OK, so I am going to assume you don’t know what a raisin is. A raisin is simply a grape that has been sun dried for about a month. The drying process takes the water content from about 75% to 15%. Dried fruit can be part of a healthy diet, but is also a food you need to research. The same could be said for all foods, but dried fruit can be deceiving! Dried fruit has been dried to the extent that the water content of the fruit is gone. A version of the fruit that is concentrated is what is left. Not only is the flavor concentrated, but also the vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fiber. A 2015 study by Dr Harold Bayes of the Louisville Metabolic Research Center found that snacking on raisins reduced blood glucose levels by 16% in those with “pre-diabetes” compared to the control group who at regular processed snacks. This favorable glucose effect of raisins was further supported by a significant reduction in A1c. By reducing blood sugar and maintaining normal A1c levels those with diabetes can help prevent long-term damage to their heart and circulatory system. Now, I want you to look at the term “snacking.” The participants in this study were give 1 ounce of raisins 3 times per day. A 2014 study concluded that raisins are a low-GI and -insulin index fruit that provides a favorable postprandial glucose and insulin response. And that raisins are high in dietary fibre, polyphenols and a number of vitamins and minerals, in addition to being rich in fructose. The study also stated that there is evidence that glycemic control can improve with judicious fructose intake and low-glycemic index. So, are raisins good for diabetes? As a snack, I would say yes. Like many foods I suggest they be eaten in moderation, but the most recent studies have shown them to a good, healthy snack for those with diabetes. I hope this answered your question are raisins good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 31754 Beat Your Diabetes
Is Coke Zero Good For Diabetes
 
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Is Coke Zero Good or Bad For Diabetes? Download Diabetes Management Book: https://www.thediabetescouncil.com/free-diabetes-guides/index.html One of the first fears I had when I was diagnosed with diabetes was that I was going to have to give up soft drinks, pop, soda, whatever you call it where you live. The reason being I was told when I was younger that diet soda caused cancer or you might grow a second head or something. I loved my soft drinks, so I was in kind of a panic. So I set out to find out the real scoop on diet soda, and in particular, Coke Zero, one of my favorites. MYTH - 1 Coke Zero will cause cancer Coke Zero or any other diet soft drink has been linked to cancer thanks to a study conducted by Morando Soffritti. Soffritti used lab rats to test the effects on aspartame utraSweet long term. His conclusion was that aspartame played a significant role as a carcinogen. The problem with his methodology was that Soffritti gave the rats more aspartame than a human could possibly ingest in a life time. Several studies have been conducted since and have found no link whatsoever between aspartame and cancer. As far as Coke Zero is concerned it does use aspartame but not in the concentrations that some other diet sodas use. It also uses Splenda as an artificial sweetener. MYTH - 2 Diet soda is harmless. Because there are no calories, sugars or carbs in diet soda, many people think it is harmless. But there is a higher concentration of acid in diet drinks. As a matter of fact, diet drinks are much more acid than “regular” soda. This can lead to acid reflux and premature tooth decay. MYTH - 3 I can lose a lot of weight by drinking Coke Zero. While Coke Zero and many other diet drinks have no calories or sugars, they also have no nutritional value either. There have actually been studies that link massive consumption of diet soda to weight gain and even diabetes! Is Coke Zero, or any diet soda good for the diabetic? Like with anything else, a diet drink in moderation is fine for the diabetic who needs that sparkly fizz now and then. But it is also a good idea to substitute a few of those Coke Zeros for glasses of water. Coke Zero won’t give you brain cancer or cause you to grow a second head, but it also not the ideal thirst quencher for those with diabetes. I hope this answered your question is Coke Zero good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes shopping list by clicking the link here: https://www.thediabetescouncil.com/free-diabetes-guides/index.html Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 79808 Beat Your Diabetes
Top 10 Snacks for Diabetes
 
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Get the best diabetes management guide here https://goo.gl/hcgQSk Let’s face it. One of the main problems those of us with diabetes have is our hunger and trying to find those in between meal snacks that are satisfying and taste good while also helping us maintain our blood sugar. When it comes to snacks, or any food for that matter, I always look at the Glycemic Load. There are those who will tell you that the Glycemic Index is what matters, but the glycemic index doesn’t really give you a complete understanding of what a particular food will do to your blood sugar. It simply gives you a number based on 50 carbs of a specific food. The glycemic load takes into account what type of carb we are dealing with and how it truly affects your blood sugar postprandial. I say this so that if you see a food on my list of best snacks and on another “experts” list it is on a list of worst snacks, you will know why. I will give you both the GI and GL of each food on this list. I also do not put my lists in any type of order. So here we go: 1. Popcorn. This is a food you will probably see on some worst snacks list because the GI is a medium 55. But the glycemic load of popcorn is a very low 2.8. In its unprocessed form, popcorn is considered a significant source of whole-grain fiber. I love popcorn for……..breakfast! Yes, popcorn with a little sucrose and 2% milk is a wonderful cereal. You may think I am crazy, fair enough, but try it. It truly is a great snack for anytime. Not just when watching a movie. A small microwave bag is the perfect size for a good snack. 2. Greek Yogurt. Greek Yogurt is rich in calcium, high in protein and probiotics. There are few foods healthier than Greek yogurt. They do have some carbs, but they aren’t significant. Greek only has about 4 grams of sugar per 6 ounce serving. Greek yogurt contains significant amounts of potassium, calcium and magnesium, which is shown to improve blood pressure. Calcium, phosphorous and magnesium are important in bone health also. The GI of Greek yogurt is 11, the GL is zero. Put some strawberries and walnuts in a cup of Greek yogurt and you are going to thank me later! 3. Walnuts. Speaking of walnuts. I am convinced walnuts are the overall best food for you. I know they are expensive, that’s why when I can find them on sale or buy them in bulk, I will jump at the chance. Stored properly they can last a while. Walnuts have a GI and GL of zero meaning that they have no significant effect on raising blood sugar, they are extremely heart healthy and they also contain copper, manganese, vitamin B1 and vitamin B6. Plus they are super rich in omega 3 fatty acids. 4. Strawberries/Blueberries. Strawberries –A great alternative to those with a sweet tooth is strawberries. They are sweet, low in calories and make a great snack. Several human studies have established that people who eat plenty of berries, such as strawberries and blueberries, have a lower risk of both diabetes, heart attacks and dementia. Studies have also linked the high vitamin C content of strawberries to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. One cup of fresh strawberries provides 160 percent of your daily need of vitamin C. Wanna really good snack? Blend fresh or frozen strawberries and/or blueberries into a smoothie. Both strawberries and blueberries have a low GI in the low 40’s as an average. They have an average GL of 4. 5. Peanut butter. Has anyone ever told you that someone with diabetes shouldn’t eat peanut butter? Tell them they are nuts. Peanut butter has a glycemic index of 14 and a glycemic load of 6. This low ranking means peanut butter helps stabilize blood sugar and insulin levels. Yes, they have a lot of calories and you will see several carbs on the label. But a tablespoon full of peanut butter is an amazing snack to fill you up. Peanut butter is is very low in Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Niacin and Manganese. 6. Apples. I know, another fruit, but a small apple (about the size of a tennis ball) delivers 77 calories, 21 grams of carbohydrate and 4 grams of fiber. It's also a good source of vitamin C and has a smattering of other vitamins and minerals. The main benefit of an apple is the richness they possess in soluble fiber. This fiber keeps you full and slows down the absorption of sugar into your bloodstream helping regulate blood glucose levels. Apples have a GI of 39 and a GL of 4 7. A dark chocolate bar. 8. Boiled eggs. 9. Sting cheese. 10. I may get laughed off youtube for this one. But #10 is peanut M&Ms.
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Is Pineapple Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Pineapple Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is pineapple good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). As we have discussed in other videos, just because you have diabetes doesn’t mean you have to give up fruit. Fruit is an essential part of a healthy diet even for those of us who have diabetes. Where we need to be smart about fruit is which ones and how much. So what about pineapple? The makeup is pretty simple: pineapples are 86% water and 14% carbs. That doesn’t sound good for the person with diabetes does it? While pineapples are very low in calories they are quite high in sugar. But don’t give up on the pineapple yet. We always have to look at the whole picture of a food before we dismiss it. One factor we must look at when deciding whether or not a food is good or bad for those with diabetes is the Glycemic Index. The lower the GI the better it is for us. In other words, foods with a lower GI has less impact on our blood sugar. Fresh pineapple has a GI of 59. This means it is a medium impact food. Foods with a GI of 50 or less is considered low impact while those with a GI of 70 or more are high. Something else we must look at is glycemic load. This basically measures the likelihood of a food raising your blood sugar after you eat it. You can calculate the GL of a food by multiplying the glycemic index by the amount of carbohydrates per serving and dividing by 100. The pineapple has a medium GI, its glycemic load is only 7, which is considered low, so it isn't likely to cause a large increase in your blood sugar levels if you just eat one serving. So is pineapple good for diabetes. Yes it is, in moderation. But be careful! These numbers are for RAW FRESH pineapple. If you go to your store and buy a can of pineapple expecting it not to affect your blood sugar you would be wrong. If choosing canned pineapple first be sure it is canned with its own juices. Secondly, do NOT get pineapple packed in heavy syrup. The amount of sugar in some canned pineapple is triple the amount of fresh. I hope this answered your question is pineapple good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Is Turmeric Good For Diabetes
 
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Is Turmeric Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is turmeric good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid) by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH I am sure many of you have heard of turmeric, but do you really know what it is? Turmeric is an herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family. It has been used in the Middle East and East India for years and has a peppery flavor. It is a very popular spice now worldwide. You probably recognize the taste as the main spice in curry. But turmeric is much more than a flavoring aid in cooking. I have found in my research that has been used for medicinal purposes for everything from arthritis to flatulence. It is used as an enema and skin cream. But what about the uses for turmeric in regards to diabetes? That is the question posed. Recent claims concerning turmeric have many people taking notice of this spice. Can turmeric prevent or actually reverse Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes? An article published in the International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism in October, 2014 makes a pretty remarkable statement concerning turmeric and diabetes. The article focused on studies from 1998 to 2013. These studies looked at the key component in turmeric, curcumin, and its effects on insulin resistance. The conclusion of the article, after reviewing all the studies, was that curcumin can reduce blood glucose levels. The article also concludes that “more studies evaluating the effects of curcumin on hyperglycemic state and insulin resistance in related disorders such as diabetes are recommended.” Another study, published in the American Diabetes publication, “Diabetes Care” found that after a 9 month curcumin intervention in pre-diabetic subjects, a significant population of those studied did not develop Type 2 diabetes. Now, this is not to say that using turmeric will cure diabetes, as some have claimed. It does suggest that curcumin has properties to help prevent and aid in the control of diabetes. A major plus also is that turmeric is a readily available, relatively inexpensive spice. So, is turmeric good for diabetes? Yes it is. Is it a cure? Well, more research has to be done to determine that. But in my research I have found that turmeric has few, if any, side effects and can help lower blood glucose levels. I am not ready to throw away my diabetes medication yet, but I will consider adding turmeric to my diet. As always, I suggest you consult your health care provider before taking any supplements that contain curcumin and monitor your blood sugar regularly if you do decide to add turmeric to your diet. I hope this answered your question is turmeric good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Is Olive Oil Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Olive Oil Good Or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is olive oil good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). Canola and olive oil are the most used oils in today’s cooking. Both are thought to be heart friendly as well as tastier than vegetable based oils. Olive oil is a fat obtained from the fruit of the Olea europaea (olive tree). It is pressed in many different ways, to give different grades. Olives from different regions have distinct flavors making choosing olive oil a difficult decision at times. The different variations can be a big difference when it comes to olive oil’s health benefits. One of the main problems with olive oil today is consumer confusion and outright consumer fraud. Spain is the largest producer of olive oil but the finest oils still come from Italy. The problem is that some companies actually ship their oil to Italy to be bottled so that they can claim their oil came from Italy. One of the worst practices is that companies will blend oils so that the acidity level is 1% and they can claim it to be “extra virgin.” We will explain how that classification is given soon. For an oil to be marked “virgin” the olive oil must be obtained by a physical pressing and it cannot undergo any other refining process. For an olive oil to be “extra virgin” the olives go through the exact same process except that it can have no more than a 1% acidity level. These oils have the highest levels of polyphenols and omega-3 fatty acids and the lowest levels of saturated fats and omega-6 fatty acids. Many studies have now shown that an olive oil-rich diet can help in the prevention of diabetes, as it reduces glucose levels, LDL cholesterol (bad) and triglyceride levels in blood. Most studies will say however, that if you truly want to reap the benefits of olive oil, it needs to be a good quality extra virgin olive oil and you should not cook with it. Cooking the oil destroys many of the healthy properties. So, is olive oil good for diabetes? A good quality extra virgin olive oil is good for diabetes. But beware, a good quality EVOO is not cheap. Going to your local market and grabbing a $5 gallon jug that says it’s extra virgin is not going to cut it. A good quality EVOO is going to cost you over a dollar an ounce. A 16 ounce bottle of pretty good quality will run about $20. Don’t be fooled by labeling and customer confusion. I hope this answered your question is olive oil good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book . Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Are Radishes Good For Diabetes
 
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Are Radishes Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, are radishes good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid) by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Quick fun fact before we get started about radishes. Radishes first appeared in the United States in Massachusetts in 1629. Does that have anything to do with where or not they are good for people with diabetes? No, but if you are ever on Jeopardy and that question comes up, you owe me money. Radishes are a root vegetable, grown and consumed around the world. The most common use of the radish is as crunchy addition to a salad. Most of you already knew that I am sure. But did you know radishes are packed with nutrients, vitamins and antioxidants. Research has found that the addition of radish in the diet helps to balance the blood glucose level because of its anti-hypertensive properties. Radishes are very low in carbs and calories. A 1-cup serving of sliced raw radishes contains only 19 calories, 4 grams of carbs, 2 grams of fiber and 1 gram of protein. Radishes are also rich in vitamins and minerals, with 29 milligrams of calcium, 270 milligrams of potassium, 17 milligrams of vitamin C and 29 milligrams of folate per 1-cup serving. Now when I said radish, I am sure this is what came to your mind. But did you know there are several varieties of radishes available year-round? And they vary in size, taste, and color. But one of the really cool things about radishes is they all share the same nutritional values. For the person with diabetes, it is well documented that radishes have a low glycemic index, which means that eating them do not impact blood sugar levels. Now I have only had those small red radishes and raw at that. But as I was researching this topic, I literally saw thousands of radish recipes. Everything from soups to drinks to pies. So, are radishes good for the person with diabetes? Yes they are. What is not good about them? High fiber, low cal and carb? They even contain enough water to keep you hydrated. Radishes are indeed good! I hope this answered your question are radishes good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Is Green Tea Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Green Tea Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is green tea good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). If you watched our video on hibiscus tea you know I am from the south and only drink 1 kind of tea, sweet ice tea. But I have been getting questions about these other types of tea and I am really enjoying researching them. Green tea. I have seen this product all over the place but never really looked at it closely. So I decided the first thing I should do is see what it really is. I was first surprised to learn that green tea and black tea originate from the same exact plant species—Camellia sinensis. What determines whether a tea is green or black is the variety of the tea plant and how the tea leaves are processed. For green tea, leaves are taken from the Camellia sinensis plant. They are then quickly heated then dried to prevent oxidation. By contrast, black tea leaves are allowed to fully oxidize before they are heat-processed and dried. So is this green tea really good for you? Christopher Ochner, a research scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital said, "It's the healthiest thing I can think of to drink. Why is green tea so healthy? "It's all about the catechin content," says Beth Reardon, RD, a Boston nutritionist. Catechin is a powerful antioxidant proven to fight and may even prevent cell damage. Green tea seems to help keep blood sugar stable in people with diabetes. Because catechins lower cholesterol and blood pressure, they can help protect against the damage a high-fat diet can cause, Ochner says. Suzanne Steinbaum, DO, a cardiologist, director of women’s heart health at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City citing a 2014 study review said, “We know people with diabetes have problems metabolizing sugar. Insulin comes along to decrease sugar, but with type 2 diabetes, the body isn’t so sensitive to insulin, so blood sugar levels go up. Through a complex biochemical reaction, tea — especially green tea — helps sensitize cells so they are better able to metabolize sugar. Green tea is good for people with diabetes because it helps the metabolic system function. There you go, who am I to contradict a cardiologist who just said Green Tea is good for people with diabetes. I hope this answered your question is green tea good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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What Kind Of Yogurt Is Good For Diabetes
 
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Get my diabetes diet and management guide here https://goo.gl/FJSeF8 If you have watched many of our videos, you probably already know the answer to this question. But, let’s talk about yogurt in general and maybe learn a little bit. If you were to walk through your local grocery store and stop by the “yogurt aisle” you might be overwhelmed. An array of colors, sizes and types that could send your head spinning: Greek. Goat’s Milk. Fruit at the bottom. Lowfat, nonfat, full fat Icelandic Organic Soy The list goes on and on. Yogurt is one of the oldest and most popular fermented foods in the world. Wait, did I say fermented? Yes I did. Yogurt is produced by bacterial fermentation of milk. “Yogurt cultures” specifically “Lactobacillus delbrueckii bulgaricus & Streptococcus thermophiles” ….we will just call them yogurt cultures, cause the milk to ferment by converting lactose into lactic acid, which thickens the milk and gives it the tangy taste characteristic of yogurt. In November, 2014 a study published in the BioMed Central Journal focused on the relationship between yogurt and diabetes. The study was conducted under the direction of Dr. Frank Hu, a professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard. The study was massive including 460,000 subjects. The results showed that one serving of yogurt per day showed an 18% decrease in the development of Type 2 diabetes. While the study was aimed at whether or not yogurt could prevent Type 2 diabetes, Hu also explained that preventative aspects were also studied. "Yogurt is not magic for curing or preventing diabetes," Hu said in an interview with WebMD. "That's the bottom line and the message we want to convey to our consumers, that we have to pay attention to our diet pattern. There is no replacement for an overall healthy diet and maintaining [a healthy] body weight." Another interesting aspect of the study was that different types of dairy was used as the basis for daily intake, but yogurt seemed to be the only dairy that showed any significant effect. Exactly how the yogurt may help is not certain. Many experts felt the probiotics in yogurt ("good" bacteria) were the main reason for the beneficial outcomes. The take-home message, Hu said, is that more study is needed, but that yogurt seems to have a place in a healthy diet. Yogurt is certainly a healthy choice but only if you are careful what type of yogurt you choose. Plain Greek yogurt is the best choice having only about 4 grams of sugar per 6 ounce serving. Some flavored yogurts can have as much as 29 grams of sugar per 6 ounce serving. You need to read the labels to see if the sugar content is going to have more of a negative effect on your body than the positive gains of the probiotics. Greek yogurt is by far the best kind of yogurt you can eat as one with diabetes. As a matter of fact, it is on my list of superfoods! You can check out that video and learn more about why Greek yogurt is my choice.
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Are Eggs Good For Diabetes?
 
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Are Eggs Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, are eggs good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). I must admit I love eggs. My favorite way to eat them is sunny side up. But I also can chow down on a good sausage and cheese omelet. Just about any way you can fix them, I like them. Eggs are a great food to me, as a one with diabetes, because the GI and the GL are ZERO. No carbs, no affect on blood sugar levels. Of course, we are talking about chicken eggs. We have looked at quail eggs in a past video and some people eat other types of animal eggs. Our focus today is on the eggs of the chicken. Which was first brought to North America on the second voyage of Columbus in 1493. But the knock on eggs for years was that eggs raise LDL or “bad” cholesterol and therefore can contribute to heart disease. For those of us with diabetes, that is not good. Because of these reports, many with diabetes shy away from eating eggs. Well, great news from the land down under. A very recent study by Nicholas Fuller, PhD, from the Boden Institute Clinical Trials Unit, University of Sydney, Australia found that that eating two eggs for breakfast, 6 days a week can be a perfectly safe addition to a healthy diet plan for people with type 2. The study went on to note that eating an egg-rich diet for 3 months resulted in better appetite control, and provided a greater sense of fullness throughout the day. "Eggs may also help with greater weight loss and less weight regain than a conventional diet, due to the greater satiety [fullness] and less hunger reported with a high-egg diet," Fuller remarked. If you are an egg lover, like me, this is great news. For years we have been told that eggs cannot be a part of a healthy diet because of the raise in cholesterol. In reality another study suggests that eggs may actually raise the HDL, or good cholesterol in those with diabetes. So are eggs good for diabetes? You bet they are. The study conducted says those of us with diabetes not only CAN eat eggs, it suggest that we DO eat 12 eggs per week. A dozen eggs every week. While the study had participants eat 2 eggs for breakfast, I like them for lunch or dinner as well. Fry them, boil them, poach them, it doesn’t matter, just eat them. I hope this answered your question are eggs good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Is Milk Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Milk Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is milk good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid) and other tips to better manage your blood sugar to avoid complications. I really love milk. To me there is not much better than an ice cold glass of milk and a warm peanut butter cookie for dessert. Now I make my own PB cookies, they are sugar free with no flour so they do not affect my blood sugar a great deal. But I had never really done much research on milk until I was asked this question. So let’s learn together about this beverage so many enjoy. Now first of all, for the purposes of this video, when I say milk, I am talking about good old fashion cow’s milk you buy in the store. I am not talking about goats milk or almond milk or any other kind of product that is associated with milk, not even milk chocolate. Just regular cow’s milk. I was told by several people who know my love for milk, that I shouldn’t drink it because it is not good for diabetes or for weight control. I decided to see if there was any scientific evidence to support their claim. I did not. Instead I found several studies saying just the opposite. A 2008 French study concluded, “Prospective trials have shown an independent negative correlation between dairy food consumption and overweight, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and ischaemic cardiovascular diseases. Large amounts of calcium can reduce intestinal fat absorption. They can also reduce lipogenesis, through an inhibitory effect on calcium calcitriol-mediated intracellular fluxes. Some soluble aminoacids appear to reduce appetite and may also improve tissular insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, arterial pressure and cardiovascular morbidity. Milk and dairy foods are recommended for patients with obesity, diabetes, hypertension and metabolic syndrome, and also for patients at risk.” A 2016 study came to basically the same conclusion stating, “Evidence suggests that there is an inverse association between the consumption of milk products and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. High-fat milk products are not associated with type 2 diabetes. In fact, certain dairy fatty acids may have a beneficial role in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. The association between different types of milk products and the risk of diabetes is less clear, but evidence suggests that yogurt and cheese may be protective against type 2 diabetes.” So is milk good for diabetes? Not only is it good for diabetes, it can possibly prevent it. For those of us with diabetes, we cannot prevent something we have, but milk will certainly help you control your weight, blood sugar and essentially control your diabetes. I hope this answered your question is milk good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book by clicking the link in the description box below. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Is Semolina Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Semolina Good For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is semolina good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid) and other tips to better manage your blood sugar to avoid complications. Semolina is a flour. Now, is it not an f l o w e r but f l o u r. It is made from durum wheat. Semolina is basically the endosperm of durum. I decided to visit my food dictionary to find out more about this flour. I found that there are difference grades of semolina. Grade 1 Semolina flour is finely ground endosperm of durum wheat. Grade 2 Semolina meal is a coarsely ground cereal like farina. Grade 3 Wheatina is ground whole-grain wheat. When other grains, such as rice or corn, are similarly ground, they are referred to as "semolina" with the grain's name added, i.e., "corn semolina" or "rice semolina." We are sticking with Grade 1 for this video. Many articles I read were pretty adamant about one thing. If you want the best pasta ever made, it must be made from durum semolina. Now I love pasta, so I was really interested in finding out more about semolina pasta and the flour it is made from. I was encouraged when I found out that semolina flour had a glycemic index of only 44, a low GI food. The pasta’s made from semolina ranged in GI from low to mid 60’s, still just a medium GI food. Then I decided to take a look at the nutritional value of semolina flour. I was rather shocked to see that a serving of semolina was 601 calories. Most low GI foods are not that high in cals. Then I took a look at the carbs. There are 122 carbs per serving of semolina flour. That is quite high, but I thought, well, this is a wheat so there must be a ton of dietary fiber. I was wrong, only 7 grams. So I did a quick calculation. The glycemic load of semolina flour is 51. That is not good. So is semolina good for diabetes? No it isn’t. The GL is way too high. Anything made with semolina would just cause your blood sugar to yo yo and that is not good. I hope this answered your question is semolina good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Is Cabbage Good For Diabetes?
 
03:13
Is Cabbage Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is cabbage good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). True or false: Cabbage is in the same family of vegetables as lettuce. False, although they look very similar cabbage is actually a part of the cruciferous vegetable family. Believe it or not, lettuce part of the daisy family. Now that we have our botany lesson out of the way, let’s take a closer look at cabbage. Cabbage has been cultivated for more than 4,000 years. It has been grown for food (domesticated) for over 2,500 years. I am sure most of you think of a connection of cabbage and the Irish, however the Celts brought cabbage to Europe from Asia around 600 B.C. Cabbage comes in various colors, the most common being green, red and purple. Cabbage leaves can be smooth or crinkled. A cup of cooked cabbage contains only 35 calories. Cabbage contains high amounts of Vitamin C and K, Magnesium, Folate, as well as antioxidants choline, beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin as well as the various flavonoids. Cabbage has a GI 10 and GL of 1, so it will not affect your blood sugar. A 2007 study at UAE University came to an exciting conclusion concerning cabbage. Diabetes was induced in 60 rats. For a 2 month period the rats were studied and showed all the symptoms of one with Type 2 diabetes. Cabbage extract was then added to the diets of the rats for 60 days. The cabbage reversed the adverse effects of diabetes at the end of the trial period. The extract lowered blood glucose levels and restored renal function and body weight loss in the experiment. The study concluded that the antioxidant and antihyperglycemic properties of cabbage extract may offer a potential therapeutic source for the treatment of diabetes. So is cabbage good for diabetes? Yes it most certainly is. Cabbage is low in cals and carbs, high in fiber, low GI and GL. Plus, it actually has the potential to help lower blood sugar levels and aid in weight loss! What’s not good about that! I hope this answered your question is cabbage good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Fruits to Eat and Avoid If You Have Diabetes
 
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Download my diabetes diet and management guide here: https://goo.gl/tjuN80 I think I want to start with those fruits we should avoid and end this video on a happy not today. Among fresh fruit, there are only a handful that fall above the low level of glycemic load. They are: Banana 11 Grapes 11 Figs 16 Dried Dates 18 Raisins 28 And the last 2 on the list aren’t actually fresh fruit. Dried fruit is a food we really should avoid as one with diabetes. They just compact all the sugars into a small package and really bump up the impact they can have on your blood sugar. Another fruit we need to avoid is any canned fruit packed in heavy syrup. Heavy syrup is honestly just another way to say “SUGAR.” It truly is a can of sugar waiting to elevate your blood sugar. Fruits canned in heavy syrup, on average, will add 40 to 50 grams of sugar per serving! So we should avoid those at all costs. If you need to get canned fruit, get those canned in water or in the fruits own juices, that is a much better substitute. While talking about fruit, we also must be sure we stay away from fruit-like foods like fruit roll ups, fruit chews and the like. Some may say made with real fruit juice and they are, but they are also made with real sugar. Also while speaking of fruit, fruit juices are something you need to be leery of as well. Many of the fruit juices have added sugar and even if not, the juice has little if any dietary fiber which helps to off set some of the sugar’s effect on your blood sugar levels. When thinking about the best fruits to eat, pick those that you like. I think choosing fruits that have edible skin is always good because of the dietary fiber they bring with them. Apples, pears, tomatoes (yes a tomato is a fruit) are all good choices. Berries are good choices for the same reason. Strawberries and blueberries bring a ton of antioxidants and Vitamin C to the table and their skin has a bit of fiber as well. As a matter of fact, apples and strawberries have the lowest GL among the most common fruits enjoyed by humans. Other great fruits are melons. For years, those of us with diabetes were told we couldn’t have melons because they were too high in sugars. The glycemic index of most melons is quite high. But when the glycemic load scale came to light, we saw that even though melons have a high GI, they really have little effect on our blood sugar at all. Watermelon is a wonderful example. Depending on what type, the GI of watermelon can be from 75 to 95. Now there is no way a person with diabetes would have even considered it OK to eat a food with a glycemic index that high, but the glycemic load of watermelon is only about 5, a perfectly fine food to eat. Citrus fruits are another great food. Oranges, grapefruit, lemons, limes all have a low GL in the 1-4 ranges. Each of these fruits bring all important Vitamin C to our bodies which helps our immune system tremendously. Other fruits that are awesome are peaches, mangos, nectarines, cherries, I mean I could really just go on and on. Fresh fruit is a wonderful choice. Also, consider frozen fruit. Most frozen fruit is great as well. Just be sure to get frozen from the field, or without additives. Sometimes those additives are sugar or some other form of unhealthy carb. How do we incorporate fruits into our daily mean plan? Hey, they are great as one of your snacks through the day. Many fruits are also a great addition to things such as greek yogurt, oatmeal, sugar free jello. Many frozen fruits are just ready for a smoothie or a bowl of milk. Cut up a peach or put some frozen peaches in a bowl with some milk and a little sucralose and you will thank me tomorrow.
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What Kind Of Meat Is Good For Diabetes?
 
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Get your diabetes management guide here https://goo.gl/VxBGfY Let me state right up front, that religious issues and other factors aside, I consider meat the flesh from an animal, mammal, amphibian, fish, etc. With that being said, this question really isn’t all that difficult. While I advocate that meat is an important part of the diet for one with diabetes, not all meats are the same. I am in favor of an occasional steak and hamburger each week. I think it helps us feel “normal” sometimes, and those of you with diabetes will know exactly what I mean. Red meat does get a bad rap because of our propensity for heart problems, but I am talking about a few meals each week, not 3 each day. But that advice given, the question didn’t concern my opinion on how often to eat meat. The question is what kind of meat is good for those with diabetes. And so, the overwhelming answer is fish. Why is fish so good for those with diabetes? Most fish and seafood is low in unhealthy saturated fats, trans fat, and cholesterol. The fat that it contains is mostly healthy, unsaturated fat. Seafood is a natural source of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. It’s packed with high-quality protein. Seafood itself does not have any carbohydrate, so it will not cause blood glucose to rise. Most fish cooks quickly and makes for an easy meal that your whole family will enjoy. One key component to think about when discussing good foods for diabetes is the Omega 3’s. Some types of fish are good sources of omega-3 fatty acids. These healthy fats may help to reduce the risk of heart disease by decreasing triglycerides, blood pressure, slowing hardening of arteries, and can also decrease the risk of arrhythmias. Sometimes, these fish high in omega-3s are called “fatty fish”. Though fatty fish are a bit higher in calories than their lower-fat counterparts, they contain mostly good fats and minimal unhealthy saturated fats. We still consider them a great protein choice! Fish that are particularly high in omega-3s include: Salmon Trout Herring Albacore tuna Mackerel Halibut Sardines Besides fish, you can get in more omega-3s by eating walnuts, flax, or by cooking with vegetable oils such as canola, soybean, flaxseed, and walnut oil. In addition to helping with heart health, omega-3s aid in fetal development during pregnancy, curb inflammation, they may protect against Parkinson's disease, and may reduce the risk for Alzheimer's disease and dementia. The Omega 3 factor combined with a great source of protein and the low carb element makes fish the best choice of “meat” for those with diabetes.
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What You Need to Know About Checking Your Blood Glucose
 
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Get my diabetes type 2 and prediabetes management guide here https://goo.gl/dEA1oL Monitoring your glucose daily is simply a vital part of managing diabetes. It also is important because it empowers you to be in charge of your disease. No matter what your treatment plan consists of, blood sugar monitoring gives you immediate feedback into how well your plan is doing. Is it working? “Checking your blood glucose gives you the freedom to make choices without worry, the confidence to learn from your actions, and the motivation to keep striving to do better,” says Linda Dale, Clinical Nurse Specialist in the Outpatient Diabetes Education Program at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Diabetes Center in Ann Arbor, Michigan. “Monitoring tells you that what you’re doing either is working or isn’t, and it serves as motivation to keep up actions that are working or to make changes.” WHAT DO THE NUMBERS MEAN? Knowing what the numbers mean is very important in regards to taking blood glucose readings. If you know everything about getting the numbers, but don’t know what they mean, you are wasting time and effort. Knowing if your blood sugar is too high or too low or just right is vital in treating diabetes. You were diagnosed with diabetes because of these numbers. Your fasting blood glucose level was greater than 126 mg/dl on 2 separate readings. This is the amount of glucose that was present in your blood after a time of not eating. Normal blood glucose levels are less than 100. Blood glucose readings of 100-125 are considered pre-diabetes. You are shooting for a fasting blood glucose level of 80-130 before each meal which is called pre-prandial. A post-prandial reading (which is 1-2 hours after eating) should be less than 180. A reading of less than 80 is considered hypoglycemic. This means your blood glucose level is getting too low. In this case you will need to get some carbs in your system. The recommended amount of carbs is 15 grams and then check your blood sugar levels again. If your readings are extremely high, especially before eating, say in the 180 range, you may need to take a fast acting insulin to help bring it down. This should be discussed with your doctor and is one of the reasons taking blood sugar readings are so important. “Regular monitoring is especially helpful for showing the positive effects of exercise,” says Dale. “Say your readings have regularly been around 140 mg/dl, but you start taking a walk every day and you start getting more readings around 120 mg/dl. That will definitely boost your motivation.” HOW OFTEN SHOULD I CHECK MY BLOOD SUGAR? At least some studies have found that the more often people monitor their blood sugar with a conventional blood sugar meter, the better their A1c levels. (The A1c test is a measure of blood sugar control over the previous two to three months.) “In a perfect world, people with Type 1 diabetes should monitor six or seven times a day,” says Om Ganda, MD, Senior Physician at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston and Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. “However, that’s often impractical because of time and resources.” If a person is newly diagnosed, starting a new treatment, or having trouble with blood sugar control, most insurance companies will pay for more strips than usual for the person to monitor more frequently, he notes. A person whose Type 1 diabetes is in stable control should monitor a minimum of four times a day. For people whose Type 2 diabetes in good control, Dr. Ganda recommends monitoring twice a day. But, he notes, the majority of his patients with Type 2 diabetes are not in good control and should check more often. Unfortunately, health insurance companies often cover only one or two test strips a day for people with Type 2 diabetes, which many experts feel isn’t really enough to offer useful information. In some cases, insurance companies will cover more strips if a doctor writes a prescription for more, and some people choose to buy more strips on their own, out of pocket. Dale notes, “Sure, test strips are expensive, but the price has not gone up in the past 20 years. At about $1 a strip, they are no more expensive than a bottle of water or a cup of coffee. It’s a matter of making the choice of where you want to spend your money.” Monitoring your blood sugar before meals gives you a baseline reading of your blood sugar before you eat. “This is the best time to check your blood sugar, so you know what it is before you start the meal,” says Ananda Basu, MD, associate professor and consultant in the Division of Endocrinology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. “Once you eat, your blood sugar is going to go up, but the baseline should be back to normal by the next meal.”
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Is Sweet Corn Or Maize Good For Diabetes
 
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Is Sweet Corn or Maize Good For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is sweet corn or maize good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid) and other tips to better manage your blood sugar to avoid complications. Let’s try another one of my now world famous one question quizzes. True or false, sweet corn is a grain. TRUE, but sweet corn is also considered a vegetable by some. It is a grain, but sweet corn is often picked before the full conversion of sugar to starch, so the immaturity allows it to technically be considered a vegetable. Regardless, I am a fan of corn, especially on the cob with a glob of butter! When we talk about sweet corn, we are also talking about maize. Maize is simply another name for corn. We are talking about sweet corn. But there are other varieties of corn to consider. Of course there is popcorn. There is flour corn. Not corn meal, an actual variety of corn grown to produce flour. Flint corn is used in many parts of the world to feed animals. There is also pod corn. You probably have this referred to as indian corn. It has many different colors and is more used for ornamental purposes these days. By far the most produced corn in the United States is dent corn or field corn. This is edible for humans, but I wouldn’t recommend it. It is basically grown to feed livestock. The corn that cows, pigs and chickens eat. If you have ever been in Walmart and you saw a bag labeled “Deer Corn” then you have seen field corn. But our focus today is on sweet corn. Now there are also several varieties of sweet corn, both yellow or golden and white or silver. But both golden and silver are so close in nutritional value it really doesn’t matter which variety you choose. You have probably heard someone say that you can’t have sweet corn if you have diabetes. But have they ever told you why? Some will point to the high starch content while others will just say because it has sweet in the name. Corn is low in Saturated Fat, and very low in Cholesterol and Sodium. It is a good source of Dietary Fiber, Thiamin and Folate. When you look at the nutritional value of corn, you will see about 45 carbs and 5 grams of sugar. But, when we break everything down and look at the dietary fiber and other contents, we are going to see that corn actually has a low glycemic index of 48 and low glycemic load of 8. So is corn good for diabetes? Yes it is. I am a fan of any food that has both a low GI and a low GL. Like with any food however, moderation is always the key, even for low GL foods. I hope this answered your question is sweet corn good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Is Okra Water Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Okra Water Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is okra water good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). Okra can be prepared in many ways: boiled, fried, grilled, baked, added to soup, made into bread, there are a lot of things to do with it. One way it is utilized is for medicine in the south. Okra peels and okra powder have actually been studied and shown to be a rather potent supplement for many of the nutrients found within the pod. Okra powder is made from grinding up the seeds while there are many different recipes for Okra water. Both are said to help with diabetes, blood disorders, headaches, all kinds of different ailments. Okra contains a very healthy amount of vitamins A,B complex and C. Okra is also an amazing source for important minerals such as iron, calcium, manganese and magnesium. It is rich in anti-oxidants such as beta-carotene, xanthin and lutein. It is one of the vegetables with highest levels of these anti-oxidants. It is these antioxidants that are thought to be helpful in the drinking of okra water. A 2015 Chinese study concluded that the antioxidants in an extract of okra, which would be found in okra water, suppresses oxidative stress and insulin resistance, thereby improving blood glucose levels in those with gestational diabetes. More studies will need to be performed for Type 2. An article floated around the internet in 2012 quoting a textbook saying that okra and okra water will “make diabetes go away.” A little more research found that what the textbook actually said was that there was anecdotal evidence that okra extracts helped some control their blood sugar but there was no scientific research to back up the claim. Okra water is pretty simple to make. Cut the ends off an a few (4 to 5) okra, unless you don’t plan on eating the okra in that case slice the entire thing in thin slices, put them in an 8 oz glass of water, put the glass in the fridge and drink it while cold. And you will have to make it yourself; I did a fairly extensive search and found no place to purchase it. Is okra water good for diabetes? Yes, it is. Will it cure diabetes as some claim? No, it will not. I hope this answered your question is okra good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. I hope this answered your question is okra water good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose (Lower High Blood Sugar)
 
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Some tips and ways to bring your blood sugar level down if it is too high. Get my guide to learn ways you can bring blood sugar down - https://goo.gl/kLnFmD What can you do if your blood sugar gets really high? I mean you need to bring it down because you can really be in trouble. Extremely high blood sugar levels can be dangerous, and they can cause lasting health complications. Remember: if you ever have blood sugar readings that remain high for more than 24 hours without coming down (and after an effort has been made to lower them), you need to call your health care provider. That being said, we've all had those days when we get a random high blood sugar reading and we are not sure what caused it…or we forget to give insulin, or we eat a delicious dessert without realizing how much sugar is actually in it. For whatever reason, those out of the ordinary high blood sugar readings happen and need to be treated. No need to rush to the doctor for every high blood sugar reading though. There are some simple steps you can take to lower blood sugar fast. The following can help most people bring down their blood sugar to an acceptable level. However, if you have any questions about how to bring down your blood glucose, it is important to talk to your health care provider. They know your situation much better and can give you a plan to attack that high blood sugar. Watch for signs of high blood sugar You know the feeling: extreme thirst, sluggishness, nausea, blurred vision, a downright sick feeling. And your family or friends may tell you that extreme irritability is a major sign you need to check your blood sugar to see if it is high. The best thing to do is to catch it before it gets really high, or it will be harder to bring down quickly, causing havoc on your blood sugar readings for days. If you do not take insulin as a part of your treatment plan, these tips will show you how to lower your blood sugar fast. If you take insulin, you will first want to give the appropriate amount of insulin to correct the blood sugar. However, insulin still takes some time to take effect before bringing the blood sugar down. These tips will help you feel a bit better in the meantime. Insulin is the medication that will bring blood glucose down the fastest. Someone who uses mealtime insulin can take correction doses to lower blood glucose. This requires a thorough understanding of when to inject, how often to give correction doses, and how much insulin to use. You will need to work with your doctor or diabetes educator to learn how to do this. With that being said, here are 3 tips to lower your blood sugar fast Hydrate. The more water you drink, the better. Drink at least two glasses of water, one right after the other. Water helps flush out your system and stabilize the glucose in the bloodstream. According to David Spiro, an RN who is a contributor to WebMD, “For people with diabetes, the risk of dehydration is greater, because higher than normal blood glucose depletes fluids. To get rid of the glucose, the kidneys will try to pass it out in the urine, but that takes water. So the higher your blood glucose, the more fluids you should drink, which is why thirst is one of the main symptoms of diabetes.” Exercise. Exercise is a good way to get better blood sugar control and keep your blood sugar levels in a healthy range as a part of your routine diabetes management. But exercise can also help lower blood sugar when it is excessively high by getting your heart pumping and the blood flowing, which uses up the glucose in your bloodstream faster. It will also get your endorphins going, which will help your body start to feel better, too. Try to keep your heart rate up for at least 10 to 15 minutes. Check your blood sugar intermittently to prevent it from rebounding too low in your attempt to stabilize it. (Note: If your blood sugars have been so high that you have high ketones in your blood—a condition called DKA or diabetic ketoacidosis—do not exercise as it may drive your blood sugar even higher.) Eat a protein-packed snack. Protein acts as a blood sugar stabilizer and can slow the absorption rate of glucose. One of the symptoms of high blood sugar is increased hunger, so this can help satisfy that craving while helping lower the blood sugar at the same time. Don't grab a snack that has a lot of sugar along with the protein, or you will be defeating the purpose of it. Good sources of protein include a tablespoon of no-sugar-added peanut butter or an ounce of cheese. But don’t overdo it. The most important thing you can do for your health and your diabetes is to pay close attention to how you feel. Whenever you feel like something is out of whack, it probably is—so test your blood sugar and do something about it. In the long run, it is easier to do your best to keep your blood sugars tightly controlled than to live with the consequences of not doing so.
Views: 240643 Beat Your Diabetes
Diabetes & Banana: Is Banana Good for Diabetes
 
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Get my guide for more information about helpful fruits and the diabetic diet https://goo.gl/zZnMmZ Everyone loves Bananas. They are one of the most nutrient packed fruits out there. As someone with diabetes you need to research everything you put into your body. So this leads me to the topic of the video. Are bananas helpful or harmful for diabetics?
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Are Onions Good For Diabetes?
 
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Are Onions Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, are onions good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide. Onions stink, they make you cry and give you very bad breath. BUT, a new study says that onions could very well be a key to lowering your blood sugar. Researchers found that the extract of onion bulb, Allium cepa, strongly lowered high blood sugar and total cholesterol levels in diabetic rats when given with the antidiabetic drug metformin. Anthony Ojieh, lead investigator of the study, said in a statement, “Onion has the potential for use in treating patients with diabetes." The study found that two doses of onion extract strongly reduced fasting blood sugar levels in diabetic rats by 50 percent. Allium cepa also reportedly lowered the total cholesterol level in diabetic rats, with the two larger doses again having the greatest effects. "We need to investigate the mechanism by which onion brought about the blood glucose reduction," Ojieh said. "We do not yet have an explanation." Onions have a very low Glyemic index number at 10 which makes their glycemic load extremely favorable to those with diabetes. Onions are high in vitamin C, a good source of fiber, and with only 45 calories per serving, add abundant flavor to a wide variety of food. Onions are sodium, fat, and cholesterol free, and provide a number of other key nutrients. So, are onions good for diabetes? Yes they are. But be sure to not to confuse raw onions with a stack of onion rings at your favorite restaurant. We are talking about raw sliced or chopped onions. I don’t think many of you are going to sit down and just eat an onion like an apple, so you must be creative in how your incorporate onions into your diet. Salads, on sandwiches, in soups, etc. Find your best fit but incorporate onions into your diet. It has so many benefits for those of us with diabetes. I hope this answered your question are onions good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Is Mango Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Mango Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is mango good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid) and other tips to better manage your blood sugar to avoid complications. OK, I haven’t done one of my now world famous one question quizzes in a while. So here goes. True or false: A mango is a drupe. The answer is true. A drupe is a fleshy fruit with thin skin and a central stone containing the seed. Other drupes would be a plum, cherry or olive. Mango is used for everything from a body scrub, to tummy tonic to an aphrodisiac. It is very versatile indeed. It is versatile in the culinary world as well. Unripe mangos are used to make pickles, chutneys and other concoctions. Ripe mango is used as a stand alone meal, an addition to fruit salads or made into jams and jellies. India is, by far, the largest producer of mangos in the world producing 18 million tons a year. The next closest is China at a little over 4 million tons. Mango has been found to be an excellent source of Vitamin-A and flavonoids like beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin. Fresh mango is also a great source of potassium, vitamin-B6, vitamin-C and vitamin-E. Mango also contains red blood cell producing copper. It has also been recognized that mango peel is rich in phytonutrients, such as the pigment antioxidants like carotenoids and polyphenols. The glycemic index of mango is just above the low mark at 56. Remember 55 and below are what we are looking for as one with diabetes. So 56 is considered a medium GI food. However, you know I prefer the glycemic load numbers as they more accurately describe what happens to our blood sugar when we eat a food. The GL scale is 1-10 as low. Mango has a GL of 8. So is mango good for diabetes? Yes it is. This soft, sweet, fleshy drupe is excellent for many reasons for one with diabetes. Fresh mango for breakfast would give you a great start to what we all hope would be a wonderful day. I hope this answered your question is mango good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Is Rice Good For Diabetes
 
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Is Rice Good or Bad For Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is rice good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid) by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Now one would think this would be a relatively easy topic to answer. I did when I first looked at it. But then during my research I found there are over 40,000 types of rice worldwide. If I were to try and cover them all, well, I am NOT going to try and over them all. There are basically 3 categories of rice. Long-grain rice accounts for about 75 percent of the domestic crop. Medium-grain rice the type of rice most commonly processed to make cold cereals. Short-grain rice grains clump together when cooked. Easy to eat with chopsticks, it is ideal for dishes like sushi. Within these categories, there are basically 2 types of rice: brown and white. Brown rice is the whole grain with just the first outer layer (husk or hull) removed through milling. It retains its fiber and germ which contains vital nutrients. White rice is brown rice that has been milled to remove the bran and much of the germ, reducing fiber and nutrient content drastically. So, let’s deal with this rice question. Brown rice is higher in magnesium and Vitamin B-6. It is high in dietary fiber and relatively low in sugar. Fiber helps to lower the glycemic load of a food. Also long grain rice is more efficient in lowering the glycemic load than short or medium grain. The culprit in rice that is difficult for the person with diabetes is carbohydrates. If you have diabetes, you know carbs and sugars are our enemy when it comes to maintaining healthy blood glucose levels. One cup of long grain brown rice contains 45 grams of carbs. For many of us with diabetes, that is our whole allotment for the entire meal. So, is rice good for diabetes? I am going to have to say it depends on the type of rice and amount you eat. As with any other food, my philosophy is moderation is the key. Serving sizes and how often you eat any type of food is what really matters. If you like rice and want to eat it on occasion, then the best rice to add to your diet would be long grain, brown basmati rice. The worst rice to add to a diet for a person with diabetes would be short grain white rice. So if you are fan of sushi because of the fish and the omega-3s, be careful how much you eat. I hope this answered your question is rice good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
Views: 48458 Beat Your Diabetes
Diabetes Foods To Eat What Can I Eat If I Have Diabetes
 
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Diabetes Foods To Eat: What Can I Eat If I Have Diabetes Diabetes Management eBook: https://goo.gl/kkVURF If you are like me, when you were first diagnosed with diabetes, everybody knew everything about it and told you what you could or couldn’t eat, right? Most of them had no idea, they were just telling you what they heard from someone who’s brother’s wife’s cousin had diabetes and she said you couldn’t have eat it. Sound familiar? Well, today I am not going to tell you what foods you should or shouldn’t eat. I am going to give you a guide for making smart choices at the grocery store. I want to walk you through the store today and give you some advice. Advice from someone who had to find out through research and trial and error about good choices for eating with diabetes. So let’s take a little journey to the local supermarket and get some food for the week, shall we? The first thing I come to in my grocery store is the cakes and pies. I never understood why we have to eat our food to get to desert, but the desert is the first thing I see at the store. It is often a struggle, but I push past the cakes and pies to reach the fruit. When thinking about fruit, there is really nothing off the table in regards to fresh fruit. Sure, some are better than others but you don’t really need to cut anything in regards to fruit. I might suggest strawberries, dates and tomatoes. Yes, a tomato is a fruit. If you prefer to put them on your veggie list that is fine too. These are on my Super Food list. If you haven’t seen that video, go give it a look. Really any fresh fruit or berry is a great choice. Even when you get over to the frozen section, frozen fruit without any additives is a great choice. Even canned fruit can be a good choice if you don’t have a good fresh selection or you need to tighten up the budget this week. Just be sure not to get fruit canned in heavy syrup. Let’s talk about veggies now. Again, most fresh veggies are in play for you. There are a few we have to be careful with. In the potato family, I suggest sweet potatoes. There are much better than russets. They are also on my Super Food list. Look for leafy green veggies. I would suggest kale (Super Food) and maybe stay away from iceberg lettuce, it is very low in nutrients. But pretty much any leafy green is in play. Fresh or frozen veggies are great for you. Just avoid canned veggies with lots of additives, especially sodium. This is one reason you may want to walk past the pickles. While here in this area, let’s talk about beans. I am a firm believer in beans being a super food. You pick them, kidney, pinto, green, beans are good, grab a few cans, you’ll thank me later. The meat aisle is up next. There are a lot of people who will tell you to walk on past the meats. I am not one of them. I believe in a low glycemic load diet and meats have a glycemic load of zero. Which means they have no impact on blood sugar whatsoever. I guess the reason many want you to stay away from meat is the fat content. Meats are ok. Go with leaner cuts if you want, but get that steak or that ground angus beef and east up. Of course, fish is a great choice, fresh fish is actually one of my super foods. Chicken and turkey are fine as well. Being a person with diabetes does not mean you can’t eat red meat. That dairy aisle is coming up. Do you like yogurt? Greek yogurt is another one of my super foods and it is fantastic. Get it plain, add your own ingredients. Some of those strawberries we already have and maybe the walnuts up ahead, now that is good stuff. When it comes to milk, I am fan of 2% and the glycemic load is 4. As far cheese goes, your choice, but I would stay with the hard cheeses personally. Nuts? I am convinced walnuts are the overall best food for you. I know they are expensive, that’s why when I can find them on sale or buy them in bulk, I will jump at the chance. Stored properly they can last a while. Peanuts (well, they are really legumes), almonds, most any tree nut is fine. OK, the dreaded bread aisle. Now, I might be the only person on the planet with diabetes to tell you this, but white bread is fine. It’s glycemic load is 10. The glycemic load of whole wheat bread is 9. They are very similar in that they don’t affect your blood sugar as much as others think. If you like white bread, get white bread. Pumpernickel is actually a better choice over whole wheat. Did we forget anything? Oh, breakfast? EGGS! Eggs are a superfood for sure! Get a dozen and you can have 2 each morning for breakfast. On the 7th day, have brunch. Eggs with a little toast and slab of sausage, maybe even a bowl of oats.
Views: 3959 Beat Your Diabetes
Is Zucchini Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Zucchini Good or Bad for Diabetes? Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Titus Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and a type2 diabetic. Today I'm going to answer the question, is zucchini good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes shopping list, 'The Diabetes Shopping List: Foods to Eat and Foods to Avoid' by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH What do you know about zucchini other than it is very hard to spell? Quick quiz: True or false? Zucchini is hard to spell? TRUE! At least for me. Zucchini is a vegetable. False, it is actually a fruit. You get mad bonus points if you got that one. Zucchini is green? False. This was a trick question. Some can also be yellow. Zucchini is part of the squash family? This is True! You get bonus points if you knew that one as well. How did you do? Don’t worry if you didn’t do very well, I didn’t either! But what about this fruit we call zucchini. What can we do with it and is it good for those of us who are diabetics? Well, I am sure most of you have had zucchini bread. There is zucchini pasta, zucchini fritters, French fried zucchini, zucchini parmesan, I better stop before I start sounding like a Forrest Gump character. There are lots of uses for zucchini, that is for sure. In an article published by The Diet Health Club, zucchini was found to zucchini to specifically aid those with type 2 diabetes. How? Well the B complex in the presence of zinc and magnesium aid in breaking down sugars. Zucchini is filled with fiber and pectin, two substances that are essential in regulating your blood sugar levels. Zucchini also has B-vitamins, folates and fiber that has a stabilizing effect on blood sugar. There are some other great benefits of zucchini. The fruit is a huge source of Vitamin C and antioxidants, it has anti-inflammatory properties, it is a high source of potassium, it helps improve digestion due to its high fiber content and it promotes good eye health. For those of us who are diabetics, we understand the importance of eye health. So, is zucchini good for the diabetic to add to his/her diet? I say a resounding YES! What is not to like about this amazing fruit? It even tastes good! Whether in bread or pasta, fried or baked, cooked or raw, zucchini is one of the best foods you can eat as a diabetic. I do want to stress that the benefits of zucchini is at its best when eaten raw. I know some of you may be thinking, I don’t think I would like it raw. Give it a try. Maybe try a LITTLE bit of salt or some other seasoning of your choice. I hope this answered your question if zucchini is good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes shopping list by clicking the link: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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Is Pomegranate Good For Diabetes?
 
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Is Pomegranate Good or BadFor Diabetes Download Diabetes Management Book: http://bit.ly/2g0NDAH Hello, I'm Ty Mason from TheDiabetesCouncil.com, researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I'm going to answer the question, is pomegranate good for diabetes. But before we get into that, make sure you download my free diabetes management book which also includes a diabetes grocery shopping guide (foods to eat and avoid). OK, a quick lesson in Latin because, one, I love ancient languages and two, this is pretty good. The pomegranate got its name from the Latin “ponum granatum” meaning seeded apple. If you look inside the pomegranate you will see that it does resemble an apple that is nothing but seeds. Another fun fact, grenadine syrup used to consisted of thickened and sweetened pomegranate juice. Today it is basically just a sales name for a syrup based on various berries, citric acid, and food coloring, mainly used in cocktail mixing. The pomegranate has long been thought of as a medicinal fruit. Both the seeds and the pulp are eaten. The seeds have quite a nice flavor. The pulp can be sweet or sour, depending on several factors. A 2006 study in Israel shows that people with diabetes who drank pomegranate juice for three months had a lower risk of hardening of the arteries. Also, the pomegranate juice appeared to slow the absorption of unhealthy LDL cholesterol by immune cells. A quick look at pomegranate juices label and one might not think this is even possible. Of the 33 carbs in pomegranate juice, 31 are from sugar! BUT according to Michael Aviram who headed this study, "In most juices, sugars are present in free -- and harmful -- forms. In pomegranate juice, however, the sugars are attached to unique antioxidants, which actually make these sugars protective against atherosclerosis. (hardening of the arteries). Aviram went on to say, that he was, “surprised to find that the sugars in pomegranate juice did not worsen diabetes markers, such as blood sugar levels, in the participants with diabetes.” Pomegranates are a good source of vitamins including vitamin A, C and E, as well as folic acid. The glycemic index of pomegranate (and its juice) is 67, which is a mid-level factor. The glycemic load is 18, also in the mid-level range. Is pomegranate good for diabetes? Yes it is. I normally would not recommend a fruit with this high of a GI, GL and sugars, but as research has shown these sugars are different. In moderation, the delicious fruit, seeds and juice of the pomegranate are indeed good for diabetes. I hope this answered your question is pomegranate good or bad for diabetes. Don’t forget to get your diabetes management book. Let me know if you have any other diabetes related questions.
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How To Beat Your High Morning Blood Sugar
 
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Get my diabetes hand book here http://bit.ly/2DlMyTN Discover how to lower your morning blood sugar easily with these tips.
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Top 10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid
 
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Get my diabetes management guide to learn about other diabetes mistakes to avoid https://goo.gl/rnwNc3 1. Skipping Breakfast….It is called the most important meal of the day for a reason. It is. The term breakfast itself lends itself to its importance. You are breaking a fast. You have not eaten in a long time. Probably the longest you go throughout the day without eating. It is important for everyone to east breakfast, but even more so for those of us with diabetes. Skipping breakfast is probably the biggest mistake we can make. There are studies available that even conclude that blood sugar reading will increase through the day without a proper breakfast. I know, you have a tight schedule and you want to get that few more minutes of sleep rather than deal with breakfast. Believe it or not, a good breakfast is more important to your body than that extra time sleeping. Why not go to bed earlier if you require that much sleep? 2. Checking Blood Sugar Levels…this might not seem to be a “mistake” to some for a breakfast list, but a fasting glucose level is something that I feel is necessary to see where you are for the day. That first reading of the day tells you a lot about how you are doing in managing your diabetes. It might also help you determine the type of breakfast you may need for the day. A first morning reading, BEFORE breakfast tells you how your meals are affecting your blood sugar during the day. That is if you take readings before every meal like we all should be doing. Don’t make this common mistake. Before you eat, take a reading, you know it doesn’t take that long and you will have a better understanding of what your body is doing. 3. Forgetting the Regulating Fiber…. Hey, we all need fiber in our diet. But those of use with diabetes might need it a little bit more. We gotta try to stay “regular” and nothing helps that more than a bit of fiber each morning. Fiber also keeps you feeling fuller longer and that will help you from getting those bad hunger pains before lunch. Fiber has no impact on your blood sugar and helps to regulate it actually. Consider a fruit with a peel, like an apple. Or better yet, make a bowl of oats. The fiber in oats is amazing and with a few additions, it’s really pretty good! 4. Leaving Out Protein….You need protein in your diet. And breakfast is the perfect time to get it. Protein actually helps your body slow down the absorption of carbs. Protein also is one of those food items that makes you feel fuller longer. Protein is pretty easy to get at breakfast. How about a couple of eggs and a piece or two of sausage? Eggs and sausage have a GL of zero which means they have no impact whatsoever on your blood sugar and they can give that burst of energy you need in the morning. If you don’t have time for eggs and sausage, a spoon full of peanut butter on your toast is also a great choice. 5. Drinking A Breakfast….Breakfast was never meant to be in liquid form. A “breakfast shake” will never replace what you get from a well balanced sit down breakfast. Breakfast “smoothies” are not going help you make it through morning with enough energy unless they are full of sugar and that is not what we want to start out the day. I did just a quick search and looked for the top 10 instant breakfast drinks either pre-prepared or an add milk variety. The average amount of carbs in those drinks was 74 and the average amount of sugar was 52 grams. I really don’t think that is the best way to start your diabetes day. 6. Parting Without Some Fruit…If you watch our channel much at all you know I am a fan of fresh fruit. You need to incorporate some fruit into your breakfast. Remember those oats we made for the fiber we need? How about throwing some strawberries and/or blueberries in there? That is going to make for a wonderful breakfast. Or how about just ending the breakfast with a nice ripe apple. It will add fiber to your breakfast, some wonderful energy and a nice crispness to start the day. 7. Mistaking Brunch For Breakfast….I don’t really know what time you consider breakfast to be, but it really isn’t 11am in most places. Breakfast is meant to be eaten to get you ready for the day. Eating it late in the morning is really not a good idea. The problem with this is that by the time you do decide to sit down and eat, you tend to be really hungry. Then, it becomes difficult to satisfy the hunger without over eating. It also means that breakfast is now going to be closely followed by the lunchtime meal. A good breakfast should supply you with the nutrients and energy that you need to get through the first part of the day. Many experts recommend having breakfast within one hour after rising. 8. Not Eating Enough…. 9. Believing Fat Isn’t Good For Breakfast…. 10. I Must Have at Least a Pot of Coffee With Breakfast…breakfast and coffee seem to go hand in hand like peanut butter and jelly or Abbot and Costello.
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