Home
Videos uploaded by user “AP Archive”
Lil Wayne stands by his 'no such thing as racism' comment.
 
02:50
(12 Oct 2016) LIL WAYNE EXPLAINS HIS 'NO SUCH THING AS RACISM' COMMENT Lil Wayne understands why some people criticized him for saying racism is over, but claims people don't see it from his perspective. The rapper got some backlash last month when he told Fox Sports 1's "Undisputed" that there was "no such thing as racism" because his concert audiences had a lot of white fans. He also said millennials knew that racism wasn't cool. When asked on Tuesday to expand on his thoughts, Lil Wayne told The Associated Press that one of the reasons he feels that way is because a white police officer saved his life when he was 12 years old after he accidentally shot himself in the chest. "Yeah, he was a cop, and my life was saved by a white man. I don't know what racism is. I know a good (expletive) named Uncle Bob, though." Carter said. The Grammy-winning rapper said he was lying on the floor when police broke down the door, stepping over his body looking for guns and drugs. But one man stopped and chastised the others for leaving him. "He was white as snow. Them (expletive) that hopped over me were blacker than me," Carter said. Carter says the man known as "Uncle Bob" personally took him to the hospital and stayed with him. "(He) stood there and waited until the doctor said 'He's gonna make it,'" Carter said. Still, he acknowledged that despite what he told Skip Bayless on "Undisputed," there is such thing as racism. However, he says when he looks out from the stage, he sees all colors. "When I open my eyes on stage and when I, at a Lil Wayne show when I come from under the stage. Man, it's not - it's the world out there. It's not a certain part or a certain kind or a certain culture or whatever of people, it's people - those people out there in that crowd. They make, quote unquote, and they make, quote unquote, Lil Wayne." He added: "That's who I happen to be, and I'm sorry I'm sorry if people can't understand. But I understand why they don't understand, it's because they don't come from the bottom of the stage and look at 20 to 30-thousand people. They don't get that opportunity. And I'm blessed to have that opportunity, so with that said I can only be honest with such a thing. I have never witnessed racism." Carter made the comments while promoting the recently published "Gone Till November: A Journal of Rikers Island," a revealing account of his eight-month jail sentence in 2010 after a gun charge. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/9b539431441b6d34f43a5c480a5ba8ee Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 415922 AP Archive
Joaquin Phoenix appears aggressive to journalist
 
02:24
(8 Nov 2003) original story = R10739 USA: BROTHER BEAR INTERVIEW - JOAQUIN PHOENIX APPEARS AGGRESSIVE TO JOURNALIST DURING INTERVIEW. R10739 R10739 n/a APTN You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/3c3f84390d6907d27aa41e885bd92bfc Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 127031 AP Archive
Turkish PM Erdogan walks off stage in clash over Gaza
 
02:37
(29 Jan 2009) SHOTLIST WEF POOL 1. Wide of stage, including Israeli President, Shimon Peres and Turkish Prime Minister, Recep Tayyip Erdogan 2. Stage, with Peres talking 3. Mid of audience listening 4. Mid of Peres and Erdogan on stage 5. Close of Peres speaking, turning to Erdogan, UPSOUND (English) Peres: "I want to understand why did they fire rockets against us. What for? There was not any siege against Gaza." 6. Various of Erdogan asking for time to respond, UPSOUND (English) Erdogan: "one minute, one minute..." 7. SOUNDBITE (Turkish) Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Turkish Prime Minister: (taken from simultaneous translation) "I feel that you perhaps feel a bit guilty and that is why perhaps you have been so strong in your words, so loud. Well you killed people. I remember the children who died on the beaches." 8. Various of Erdogan trying to speak and, chairperson trying to end proceedings 9. Erdogan walking off stage AP TELEVISION 10. People gathered in hallway 11. Close up of sign reading: (English) "middle east peace" 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Amr Moussa, Arab League Secretary-General: "Yes he walked out because he was not given the full time to answer, and we also wanted him to answer because what Mr. Peres said was first unacceptable, second, many of the points were not really accurate and we wanted to say something. So the Prime Minister of Turkey was not given that opportunity. He is after all the Prime Minister of Turkey and he wants to speak." (Question: And he was in his right to walk out and make a point?) "This is a different story. He is angry and I believe we are going to see him now." 13. Cutaway delegates ++MUTE++ STORYLINE Turkey's prime minister stalked off the stage at the World Economic Forum on Thursday after reproaching Israel's president over the devastating military offensive in Gaza. The packed audience, which included President Barack Obama's close adviser Valerie Jarrett, appeared stunned as Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Israeli President Shimon Peres raised their voices and traded accusations. Peres was passionate in his defence of Israel's 23-day offensive in Gaza, which it said targeted Gaza-rulers Hamas and aimed to stop Palestinian militant rocket fire into southern Israeli towns. As he spoke, Peres often turned toward Erdogan, who in his remarks had criticised Israel's strict blockade of the Gaza Strip. "Why did they fire rockets? There was no siege against Gaza," Peres said, raising his voice. The heated debate with Israel and Turkey at the centre was significant because of the key role Turkey has played as a moderator between Israel and Syria. Erdogan appeared to express a sense of disappointment when he recounted how he had met with the Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert just days before the offensive, and believed they were close to reaching terms for a face-to-face meeting with Syrian leaders. Obama's new Mideast envoy, George Mitchell, will be in Turkey for talks on Sunday. Erdogan was angry when a panel moderator cut off his remarks in response to an impassioned monologue by Peres defending Israel's offensive. The angry exchange followed an hour-long debate at the forum attended by world leaders in Davos. Erdogan tried to rebut Peres as the discussion was ending, asking the moderator, Washington Post columnist David Ignatius, to let him speak once more. "You killed people," Erdogan told the 85-year-old Israeli leader. "I remember the children who died on beaches." When moderator repeatedly interrupted, asking him to stop, Erdogan angrily stalked off, leaving behind fellow panelists United Nations Secretary-General Ban-Ki Moon and Arab League Secretary-General, Amr Moussa. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/61e8fccf791b1e2f8766ea162b585a06 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 358595 AP Archive
President Bush reacts to Obama's victory in 2008 election
 
03:51
SHOTLIST 1. US President George W. Bush walks to podium 2. SOUNDBITE: (English) George W. Bush, US President: "Good morning. Last night I had a warm conversation with president-elect Barack Obama. I congratulated him and Senator Biden on their impressive victory. I told the president-elect he could count on complete cooperation from my administration as he makes the transition to the White House. I also spoke to Senator John McCain. I congratulated him on a determined campaign that he and Governor Palin ran. The American people will always be grateful for the lifetime of service John McCain has devoted to this nation, and I know he will continue to make tremendous contributions to our country. No matter how they cast their ballots, all Americans can be proud of the history that was made yesterday. Across the country citizens voted in large numbers. They showed a watching world the vitality of American democracy and the stride we have made toward a more perfect union. They chose a president whose journey represents a triumph of the American story. A testament to hard work, optimism and faith in the enduring promise of our nation. Many of our citizens thought they would never live to see that day. This moment is especially uplifting for a generation of Americans who witnessed the struggles of civil rights with their own eyes; four decades later, see a dream fulfilled. A long campaign is ended and we move forward as a nation. Embarking on a period of change in Washington, yet there are some things that will not change. The United States government will remain vigilant in meeting its most important responsibility: protecting the American people. And the world can be certain this commitment will remain steadfast under our next commander in chief. There is important work to do in the months ahead and I will continue to conduct the people's business as long as this office remains in my trust. During this time of transition I will keep the president-elect fully informed on important decisions. When the time comes on January 20 Laura and I will return home to Texas with treasured memories of our time here, with profound gratitude for the honour of serving this amazing country. It will be a stirring sight to watch President Obama, his wife, Michelle, and their beautiful girls step through the doors of the White House. I know millions of Americans will be overcome with pride at this inspiring moment that so many have waited so long. I know Senator Obama's beloved mother and grandparents would have been thrilled to watch the child they raised ascend the steps of the Capitol and take his oath to uphold the constitution of the greatest nation on the face of the earth. Last night I extended an invitation to the president-elect and Mrs Obama to come to the White House and Laura and I are looking forward to welcoming them as soon as possible. Thank you very much." 3. Bush walks away STORYLINE: US President George W. Bush fully embraced the election of Democrat Barack Obama as his successor on Wednesday, paying stirring tribute to the election of the first U.S. black president-elect and hailing the campaign of change that led Obama to victory. Bush promised Obama his "complete cooperation" during the Democrat's 76-day transition to the White House. The president said he would keep Obama informed on all his decisions between now and January 20, and said he looked forward to the day - soon, he hopes - that Obama and his family would take him up on his offer of pre-inauguration White House visit. The defeated leader of his own party, John McCain, won accolades not nearly so glowing with Bush hailing his lifetime of service to the US. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/2fa200219adad4f7856826ee20527d8b Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 601767 AP Archive
Japan - New discoveries in paper folding
 
02:49
T/I: 10:24:08 Anything made out of paper is generally thought to be structurally weak, but with skilful folding, paper can gain unexpected strength. The Japanese art of origami, or paper folding, has long been admired for its ingenuity, but this traditional pastime is now providing the basis for the foundation of a new technology. Two years ago, Professor Hideyuki Ohtaki, a teacher in mechanical engineering at Saitama University, and his students began conducting research into paper structures. They discovered that long triangular cylinders threaded horizontally through a collection of hexagons produced a strong structure that resisted twisting -- strong enough to hold the weight of a person. A tricycle made entirely out of recycled paper, using joints made from paper cups, was among the objects built to demonstrate the strength of their chosen material. With a fire and water resistant coating, paper could be used in unique ways giving it new options for the years ahead. SHOWS: JAPAN RECENT CU flimsy pieces of paper; Paper being folded into strong structure; Strong paper taking weight of apple; Exterior of Saitama University; Interior shot of researchers in meeting; SOT Professor Hideyuki Ohtaki: "Compared to metals, paper is extremely light-weight and easy to recycle. These advantages create various possibilities for the use of strong paper structures." Student cutting out paper shapes, CU paper structure being made on desk, CU completed structure, strength of structure being demonstrated; Person standing on strong paper structure; VS tricyle made from paper; VS strong paper structures; VS of paper structures. 2.49 You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/54786da5df3e59a4477a85b9cc388fff Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 47247 AP Archive
President Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy depart from the Capitol after the inauguration of George
 
01:52
(20 Jan 1989) Ronald Reagan flashed one last salute to George Bush and left the nation's capital to begin the life of an ex-president in California. Reagan, walking hand-in-hand with his wife Nancy, bid the new president and first lady Barbara Bush farewell with handshakes and kisses on the east side of the Capitol at the conclusion of his successor's inaugural ceremonies. The ex-president turned to salute Bush as Mrs. Reagan waved from the door of the aircraft. The new president returned the gesture. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/8c8b83e8c34843faa10f5efc3fa34c2f Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 57922 AP Archive
Croatian president in Russia for World Cup match
 
02:22
(1 Jul 2018) Among the fans watching Croatia's World Cup game against Denmark in Nizhny Novgorod was Croatia's President, Kolinda Grabar-Kitarovic. Earlier, wearing a Croatian team shirt, she strolled around the city's landmarks, including the promenade with its backdrop of the stadium where the game was played.   Grabar-Kitarovic praised Russia's handling of the World Cup, saying it had created an open environment for visiting supporters without compromising on security. Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Archive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APArchives Google+: https://plus.google.com/b/102011028589719587178/+APArchive​ Tumblr: https://aparchives.tumblr.com/​​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/ You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/7a743516f50fba4a48076a372fc5bf4b
Views: 2248603 AP Archive
Former terrorism advisor Richard Clarke testifies on 9/11
 
03:55
1. Richard Clarke walking into hearing room 2. Clarke sitting down at witness table, pan over to commission members 3. Clarke raises his right hand and takes oath 4. Commission Chair Thomas Kean 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Richard Clarke, Former White House Counter-terrorism Adviser "I also welcome the hearings because it is finally a forum where I can apologise to the loved ones of the victims of 9-11. To them who are here in the room, to those who are watching on television, your government failed you. Those entrusted with protecting you failed you, and I failed you. We tried hard, but that doesn't matter because we failed. And for that failure, I would ask, once all the facts are out, for your understanding and your forgiveness." 6. Various of hearing 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Timothy Roemer, 9/11 Commission Member "How high a priority was fighting al-Qaida in the Bush administration?" 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Richard Clarke, Former White House Counter-terrorism Adviser "I believe the Bush administration, in the first eight months, considered terrorism an important issue but not an urgent issue." 9. Wide shots of hearing 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) John Lehman, 9/11 Commission Member "The inconsistency between what your promoters are putting out and what you said as late as August 05, you've got a real credibility problem. And because of my real genuine, long-term admiration for you, I hope you resolve that credibility problem, because I hate to see you become totally shoved to one side during a presidential campaign as an active partisan selling a book." 11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Richard Clarke, Former White House Counter-terrorism Adviser "I've been accused of being a member of John Kerry's campaign team several times this week, including by the White House. The White House has said that my book is an audition for a high level position in the Kerry campaign. So let me say here as I am under oath, that I will not accept any position in the Kerry administration should there be one, on the record, under oath." 12. Mid shot of hearing 13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Richard Clarke, Former White House Counter-terrorism Adviser "In the 15 hours of testimony, no one asked me what I thought about the president's invasion of Iraq. And the reason I am strident in my criticism of the president of the United States is because by invading Iraq - something I was not asked about by the commission, something I chose to write a lot about in the book - by invading Iraq, the president of the United States has greatly undermined the war on terrorism." 14. Wide pan of hearing STORYLINE: The US government's former top counterterrorism adviser apologised to the families of September 11 victims on Wednesday, saying "your government failed you." Richard Clarke made the comments just before testifying before a bipartisan commission investigating the September 11, 2001, attacks. It was the second day of hearings with Bush and Clinton administration officials as the commission tried to determine what went wrong in the efforts to stop al-Qaida before the 9/11 attacks. Clarke, who has received much attention in recent days for the release of his book, which is highly critical of the Bush administration for its response to al-Qaida, delivered a sharp attack against President Bush and his top advisers. He said although he continued to describe terrorism as an urgent problem, the Bush administration never treated it that way. In comparison, Clarke said the Clinton administration had "no higher priority" than combating terror. Clarke said he was so frustrated by the Bush team's lack of urgency that he asked to be reassigned. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/1e6b764b0af3e008816477da43e91b4a Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 16542 AP Archive
President George H.W. Bush takes the oath of office administered by Chief Justice William Rehnquist
 
02:46
(20 Jan 1989) Vice President George H.W. Bush places his left hand upon two Bibles, one used by George Washington, one by his own family, and takes his oath, administered by Chief Justice William Rehnquist. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/de236ebb3564466b90861501627e6fd3 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 31478 AP Archive
Nelson Mandela Released From Prison  - 1990
 
02:39
AP footage showing the release of Nelson Mandela after 27 years in prison. Crowds of well wishers are there to see him released. 11 February 1990 PAARL (commentary throughout this section). GV prison gate and many police Car convoy towards outer gate. Crowd waiting to see Mandela. LS Nelson and Winnie walk hand in hand. Winnie raises clenched fist. Both give ANC salute. CU Mandela walking. MCU Nelson and Winnie in car. Car moves off through crush of supporters and security and cameramen. motorcade leaving. 11 February 1990 CAPETOWN. GV motorcycle outriders lead Mandela convoy. PAN Convoy passing. Mandela car, damaged, drives past. Mandela car surrounded by supporters. MCU Mandela on balcony with supporters. Walter Sisulu chants to crowd, and introduces Mandela to crowd. Mandela chants to crowd. Crowd chants. X01716 You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/3a74d9933ba10bf172e48cc971748921 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 88662 AP Archive
Prince William brings George and Charlotte to meet their baby brother
 
01:32
(23 Apr 2018) Prince William has brought his children, 4-year-old Prince George and Princess Charlotte, who turns 3 next week, to meet their new baby brother. William's wife, the Duchess of Cambridge, gave birth to a son just after 11 a.m. (1000 GMT; 6 a.m. EDT) on Monday at the Lindo Wing at St Mary's Hospital. Both George and Charlotte were born at the same hospital, as were William and his younger brother, Prince Harry. Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Archive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APArchives Google+: https://plus.google.com/b/102011028589719587178/+APArchive​ Tumblr: https://aparchives.tumblr.com/​​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/ You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/e15910c10695c2edb242bdf604e8f2ce
Views: 83753 AP Archive
Australian diver comments on Thai cave rescue operation
 
01:58
(5 Jul 2018) RESTRICTION SUMMARY: AP CLIENTS ONLY ASSOCIATED PRESS – AP CLIENTS ONLY Mae Sai – 5 July 2018 1. Matt Fitzgerald, from Australian Federal Police (AFP) tactical response dive team, talking to reporters 2. SOUNDBITE (English) Matt Fitzgerald, member of Tactical Response Dive Team, Australian Federal Police: "It will be terrifying, but the children are aware of the cave, they know the cave, they have been the cave very often so." 3. Two members of AFP tactical response dive team near cave entrance 4. SOUNDBITE (English) Matt Fitzgerald, member of Tactical Response Dive Team, Australian Federal Police: "At this point in time, the AFP dive team has reached cave, point three, of the cave, which is approximately 1.5 kilometres in. (Reporter, off-camera: "And that's point, isn't it, where it becomes a diver-only to get through, is that right?") Fizgerald: "Yes, at that point in time, it's a specific dive requirement, unfortunately, based on some of our equipment, it's a challenge for us, at this point in time which we are working around." 5. Emergency workers during rescue operation 6. SOUNDBITE (English) Matt Fitzgerald, member of Tactical Response Dive Team, Australian Federal Police: "It's quite challenging obviously. It's zero visibility, It's confined space so it's challenging." 7. Various of rescue and emergency workers at rescue base STORYLINE: A member of the Australian Federal Police who are assisting Thai authorities in rescuing the 12 boys and their football coach trapped inside a cave in northern Thailand said on Thursday that rescuing the boys remained a challenge. Matt Fitzgerald, from Australia's Federal Police tactical response dive team, told reporters despite zero visibility and confined space rescuers were working around problems. Thai officials have said they prefer to get the boys out as soon as possible because heavy rain is expected to start by Saturday, which almost surely will raise water levels again in the cave, making passage in some areas even more difficult if not impossible. They are hoping that an upgraded draining effort can lower the water level in an area where it is still at the ceiling or just about. The idea is to get some headroom so the boys would not be reliant on scuba apparatus for a long stretch and could keep their heads above water. The boys, aged 11-16, and their 25-year-old coach disappeared after they went exploring in the Tham Luang Nang Non cave in the northern province after a football game June 23. =========================================================== Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com (ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Archive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APArchives Google+: https://plus.google.com/b/102011028589719587178/+APArchive​ Tumblr: https://aparchives.tumblr.com/​​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/ You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/3578bda6b6e3845e02d7fc135830de0e
Views: 57280 AP Archive
India - Debate Of Confidence Starts
 
02:11
T/I: 10:27:07 The Indian parliament on Monday (27/5) began debating a vote of no-confidence which threatens to bring down the country's first Hindu nationalist government. The debate, in the Indian Lok Sabah (lower house of Parliament) will decide if India's BJP government survives. SHOWS: NEW DELHI, INDIA 27/05 Exterior view of Parliament House Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee arrives WS interior parliament Vajpayee SOT (in Hindi) WS Parliamentarians Vajpayee SOT (in Hindi) WS parliament Former Prime Minister P.V. Narasimha Rao SOT:"What I said was that, from Indira Ghandi's days, there was a clear announcement from the government of India here in this house that the personal law from any section of people can not be changed without consulting them and taking their consent." Former Commerce Minister Chidambaram outside parliament commenting on Vajpayee's speech to parliament SOT: "The entire speech is laced with anti-Muslim sentiment. Why is he not talking about other things? He is not talking about anything else. Perhaps he is preparing for an election speech?" 2.10 You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/369159373d2b172fafe0b063b6942f62 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 575920 AP Archive
UK - Wedding Imran Khan and Jemima Goldsmith - 1995
 
02:35
A civil marriage ceremony for cricket star Imran Kahn and heiress Jemima Goldsmith took place on Tuesday (20/6) on the outskirts of London. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/4fd0f63b1af2cd4ac66e12e30b240ad2 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 633928 AP Archive
Charles & Diana Wedding in 4K | Part 1 | Arrivals at St Paul's Cathedral | 1981
 
10:22
Viewable for the first time in high quality 4K, this is reel 1 of the 25 minute British Movietone documentary called "The Royal Wedding". This stunning 4K version has been made from the original British Movietone 35 mm negative. Movietone were the only company to film events of this momentous day on film rather than video. A seamless version of the documentary is available via AP Archive in London. The file size is too large to upload to YouTube so we have loaded up each individual reel for you to enjoy in 4K quality, plus 12 clips of key moments from this special day. Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4AVxcfadVkU Part 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJQjF7iGldI&t=29s REEL 1 - GV The Queen's Landau from Buckingham Palace zoom into the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh. LS The Queen Mother's landau. GV Bridesmaids car arrives at St. Paul's Cathedral. GV Crowd. MS Bridesmaids from car. MS Bridesmaid and Page boys up steps and into St. Paul's x 2. MS Margaret Thatcher and Denis Thatcher. LS Mrs Nancy Regan arrives. GV Crowd and flags. LS Crowned Heads Of Europe on St Pauls steps. CU The Queen and DUke in landau x 2. GV Prince Charles landau from Palace zoom into him and Prince Andrew x 3. TS The Queen's carriage arrives at St. Pauls. CU Lord Mayor Of London (Sir Ronald Gardn � er-Thorpe) MS The Queen and Duke greeted by Lord Mayor. LS The Queen Mother and Prince Edward. LS The Queen, Duke, Queen Mother and Prince Edward enter St. Pauls. Zoom in Prince Charles' Carriage Procession x 2. MS Mounted Police outside Clarence House zoom out The Glass Coach leaves Clarence House. GV Interior The Queen's procession in St. Pauls. LS The Queen and Duke. LS Members of Royal Family move to seats. MS As before with King Of Tonga in background. LS Members of Royal Family followed by Queen Mother, Queen and Duke pull back to show choir and congregation. MS Royal Family seated. Zoom in Prince Charles and Prince Andrew from carriage and up steps x 2. LS Brides Carriage procession in Trafalgar Square. LS Prince Charles walks up aisle x 3. LS Glass Coach arrives at St Pauls. MS Earl Spencer out. CU Lady Sarah Armstrong Jones and India Hicks. MS Bride from carriage. MS Bride and father wave from half way up steps. MS Bride on steps whilst train adjusted. MS Bride up steps. LS Bride into St. Pauls. GV Interior Bride's procession up aisle. LS Procession of Clergy. CU Bishop of London (Right Rev Graham Leonard). LS Bride up aisle and joined by groom. GV Congregation. This footage is available to licence for commercial use from the AP Archive - http://www.aparchive.com/ContactUs Find out more about AP Archive - http://www.aparchive.com/AboutUs Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Archive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APArchives Tumblr: https://aparchives.tumblr.com/
Views: 293876 AP Archive
Italy: Rome: Funeral Of Actor Marcello Mastroianni - 1996
 
03:16
Italian actor Marcello Mastroianni has been laid to rest in Rome Sunday. In a simple civic ceremony at Rome's Campidoglio (city hall) family members, celebrities and fans remembered their friend and hero - a man whose acting career spanned nearly fifty years. With the song from his movie "eight-and-a-half" playing in the background - friends spoke of their memories of the star. After the ceremony his coffin was taken across Rome and placed in the family vault. Mastroianni died in Paris Thursday from pancreatic cancer aged 72. There was music and applause - perfectly fitting for Italy's acting great Marcello Mastroianni to make his finale. As his coffin was carried into Rome's Campidoglio the huge crowd broke into a thunderous applause - thanks for the man who had entertained them since his cinematic debut in 1947. And in the background - the theme music from his movie "eight-and-a-half". Rome's mayor Francesco Rutelli accompanied Mastroianni's grieving family into the ceremony. His widow Flora Carabella and daughter Barbara took their seats with another of Italy's greatest acting exports - Sofia Loren. Loren and Mastroianni had performed in 12 films together - they had also been close friends. Many of Italy's most renowned actors and directors had come to say their last farewell - including actress Monica Vitti. Mastroianni's long-time seamstress simply summarised his importance in Italian cinema. SOUNDBITE: (Italian) "You will always be in my heart and in the heart of Italian cinema. Thank you for everything." SUPER-CAPTION: Angela Insimani, Mastroianni's seamstress. As the music played and memories of Marcello flooded back - Sofia Loren broke down in tears as she held the hand of his widow Flora. She says they made one of the great cinematic partnerships. SOUNDBITE: (English) "There was a kind of chemistry between us that could not be compared with anybody else, with anyone else. Q/ Do you have a last message for Marcello? "Ciao Marcello, I will never forget you. You will always be in my heart, I know that." SUPER-CAPTION: Sofia Loren, actress. After the ceremony - Mastroianni's body was transported across Rome to the Verrano cemetery where the family vault is. There he will now rest - but always remembered through the 160 films that he starred in. More often than not, he was the quintessential "Latin lover" - most famous for his role in Fellini's film "La Dolce Vita". You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/9155171680ef6ff9839d17d403bae6f2 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 129982 AP Archive
Mandela sees grandson reclaim family's traditional leadership role
 
02:54
1. Wide of Mvezo 2. Close-up of sign: The Kingdom of Abathembu 3. Various of arrivals 4. Former South African President Nelson Mandela sitting on chair with two other men 5. Close-up of Nelson Mandela 6. Various of arrivals entering tent 7. Wide of Nelson Mandela's helicopter landing 8. Nelson Mandela's car pulling up to front of tent 9. Mandela exiting car 10. Mandela entering tent 11. Wide of people sitting in tent 12. SOUNDBITE: (Xhosa) Nelson Mandela, Former South African President: "Because I am still alive today so that I can be able to rest in peace because my grandson has taken chieftaincy and rules here at Mvezo. That will make me sleep forever being a happy man in my grave knowing that Mandla has taken this chieftaincy that I was supposed to have taken. This young man has always been of help to me and in my life." 13. Various of animal skins on floor 14. Close-up of Mandla Mandela, tilt down to his feet 15. Mid-shot of Mandla Mandela 16. Mid-shot of King Goodwill Zwelithini's daughter 17. Mandla Mandela being anointed by local priests and chiefs 18. Close-up of Nelson Mandela nodding STORYLINE: Former South African President Nelson Mandela beamed on Monday as he watched his grandson reclaim a traditional leadership post that Mandela had renounced decades ago to become a lawyer and dedicate his life to fighting apartheid. Mandla Mandela, 32, was draped in a lion skin, the symbol of royalty, and officially installed as head of the Mvezo Traditional Council by the king of the AbaThembu, Zwelibanzi Dalindyebo, one of six kings of the Xhosa people. The ceremony took place in front of hundreds of well wishers, including tribal royalty from across the country, most of them clad in brightly coloured traditional dress and beaded headdresses. It was the first time in nearly 70 years that a member of Mandela's family from the Madiba clan took up the mantle of traditional leadership. Dressed in a black and white animal print shirt, he walked with difficulty up the stairs but otherwise looked in good health and in radiant spirits as he delivered a short speech in Xhosa in a firm voice. "That will make me sleep forever being a happy man in my grave knowing that Mandla has taken this chieftaincy that I was supposed to have taken," said Nelson Mandela. Mandla Mandela's father Makgatho, Nelson Mandela's last surviving son, died in 2005 of AIDS-related complications. His mother, Rayne Mandela-Perry, said her late husband would have been proud to see his son carry on the family legacy. Mandla Mandela, who graduated from Rhodes University's political science program last week, now has the power to decide disputes and try certain criminal and civil cases. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/ad494e1c5bd71f81f1fcee4d5a20c2d9 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 198549 AP Archive
USA: PAKISTAN'S BENAZIR BHUTTO MEETS PRESIDENT BILL CLINTON
 
02:09
English/Nat Pakistan's Prime Minister, Benazir Bhutto, met with U-S President Bill Clinton today (Tuesday) to deliver a clear message: my planes or my money. Benazir Bhutto wants the Clinton administration to either unfreeze the delivery of 28 F- 16 fighter jets or return the one-point-four (b) billion dollars paid for them. Clinton promised to urge Congress to reimburse Pakistan. But he is limited by a 1990 law which freezes U-S military supplies and economic aid to Pakistan due to concerns that it was developing nuclear weapons. Bhutto told Clinton that Pakistan had no nuclear weapons, although she claimed it had the knowledge to build them. President Clinton's administration inherited the uncomfortable situation of Pakistan's payment of one-point-four billion U-S dollars for fighter jets it never received. The 28 F-16 fighter jets were manufactured and paid for, but never delivered. The deal is being held up by a 1990 U-S law freezing economic aid and military supplies for Pakistan over concern that it is acquiring nuclear weapons. Bhutto said Pakistan had the knowledge to develop atomic weapons, but had decided against assembling, exporting or detonating nuclear devices. The measure is known as the Pressler amendment, after its sponsor, Senator Larry Pressler of South Dakota. Following their meeting, President Clinton says the situation is unfair and must be addressed. SOUNDBITE: "I don't think what happened was fair to Pakistan, in terms of the money. Now under the law, we can't give up the equipment, the law is clear. So I intend to consult with Congress on that to see what we can do." SUPER CAPTION: US President Bill Clinton Bhutto felt progress was being made on the five year old dispute. SOUNDBITE: "I'm encouraged by my discussions with the president this morning and with the concern he has shown for Pakistan. I welcome the Clinton administration's decision to work with Congress to revise the Pressler amendment." SUPER CAPTION: Pakistan PM Benazir Bhutto The two leaders also discussed the 48-year-old conflict between Pakistan and India over control of the disputed Kashmir territory on their borders. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/abdb4df304801bea0bf04dde59899642 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 160069 AP Archive
USA: NOBEL PRIZE FOR CHEMISTRY AWARDED TO SCIENTIST ZEWAIL
 
02:36
Los Angeles, USA, 12 October 1999 The Nobel Prize for Chemistry has been awarded to an Egyptian-American for his pioneering work with lasers. Scientist, Ahmed Zewail has shown that a rapid-firing laser can observe the motion of atoms in a molecule, during chemical reactions. The Nobel Prize is the latest in a series of plaudits offered to Zewail and his colleagues at the California Institute of Technology for work in this field. It was congratulations all round when Ahmed Zewail arrived at work on Tuesday morning The 53-year-old scientist had just found out that he had been awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for his work capturing ultrafast snapshots of atomic reactions. SOUNDBITE: (English) "Well in the excited state as they say, I feel well, very, very well. (Q) Did you expect it? You can never expect a Nobel Prize, nobody ever expects a Nobel Prize. People tell you that you can get it but you never expect a Nobel Prize so it was very thrilling to get the call at 5.30 this morning. (Q) What happened with the telephone call? Well the Royal Swedish Academy, the secretary-general called and he said 'I'm sorry to wake you up and I have some good news' and then he told me about the award and the significance and so on. (Q) How did you feel when you got off the phone? Did you jump in the air? I went and kissed my wife and kissed my children and she made a cup of coffee and the phone did not stop until now. It just did not stop." SUPER CAPTION: Ahmed Zewail, Nobel Laureate Colleagues who work with Zewail are elated at the award and say he's a deserving recipient. SOUNDBITE: (English) "Yeah I was excited, I woke up at six and went and turned on the computer and went on-line and there he was, Ahmed Zewail, it was unbelievable. I'm really excited, I'm so happy and I'm one hundred percent sure he deserves it, it's great." SUPER CAPTION: SOUNDBITE: (English) "He did some very good experiments in the late 80s and he's the founder of the field. Now there's hundreds of groups all over the world doing the same thing and I think many people didn't believe it was possible but he showed it was and now it's a standard thing, text-books, conferences, everywhere." SUPER CAPTION: Zewails' development known as femtochemistry, uses ultra-fast lasers to measure the movement of atoms during chemical reactions. His ground-breaking research has helped explain the way the human eye adjusts to the dark and the way plants convert light to food in photosynthesis. SOUNDBITE: (English) "Until the work at CalTech you could not really see them in real time, you could not see the motion of the atoms." SUPER CAPTION: Ahmed Zewail, Nobel Laureate Zewail grew up in Egypt and got his first science degree from Alexandria University in 1967. From there he went to the United States, where he earned a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania. He then performed research at the University of California in Berkeley and was appointed to CalTech's faculty in 1976. Zewail and his team have been showered with honours over the years, the Nobel prize is the latest. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/31443ed802a63e1639b8f6b031fcb92c Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 7808 AP Archive
UK: PRESIDENT MANDELA'S ROYAL WELCOME TO BRITAIN
 
04:01
(9 Jul 1996) English/Nat Britain is giving the red carpet treatment to Nelson Mandela, the man who smashed apartheid in South Africa. In Britain, on a four-day state visit, the South African President is being hailed as a hero. It's the first state visit to the country by a South African president. President Nelson Mandela's state visit to Britain began according to tradition. Met by the Princess Royal at London's exclusive Dorchester Hotel, the hero of apartheid was whisked off to Horse Guards Parade to inspect a guard of honour. At 12.40 pm local time, a Royal gun salute boomed across the capital as the President's limousine glided into the parade ground. The formal welcoming party, headed by the Queen, the Duke of Edinburgh, Prime Minister John Major and several top ministers, bore all the traditional pomp and ceremony befitting a visiting head of state. But the South African leader received a rather less formal welcome from the crowd. More than six-thousand people had gathered at the square - the largest turnout for a head of state's welcome since the birth of television. Chanting 'Nelson', 'Nelson', they waved South African flags and craned their necks for a view of the man who was once known as the Black Pimpernel. Britain's Queen Elizabeth appeared pleased to meet Mandela. She made a highly successful visit to South Africa last year, and clearly enjoys Mandela's company. The band of the Irish Guards played the South African national anthem, incorporating the last few bars of the old Afrikaans anthem, signifying the transition from old to new. On Horse Guards Parade, President Mandela, wearing a smart, dark business suit, inspected the honour guard. His walk was stiff, but he appeared as dignified as ever. Then he and daughter Zenani joined their royal escort to parade down The Mall in open carriages to Buckingham Palace. Later in the day, the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh gave a state dinner in Mandela's honour. The Queen Mother paid tribute to the South African President by attending her first Buckingham Palace state banquet in almost three years. The 95-year-old Queen Mother sat on Mandela's right. The Queen was on his left. The Prince of Wales, Duke of York, Princess Royal, and Princess Margaret were also present. As were Prime Minister John Major and senior cabinet ministers. In all, around 200 guests were assembled in the sumptuous Palace Ballroom. In her formal welcome to the guest of honour, Queen Elizabeth II stressed the close ties between Britain and South Africa. SOUNDBITE: Mr President, South Africa has a special place in my heart and in the hearts of the British people. Our two counties are bound together by history, by common interest and by ideals and aspirations. SUPER CAPTION: Queen Elizabeth II The Queen and Mandela then touched glasses in a toast to an even tighter bond between their two nations in the future. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/7d9674fe3d5bf3d17a4a165db12dee1e Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 24711 AP Archive
IAN SMITH TALKS ABOUT PRESIDENT ROBERT MUGABE
 
02:31
English/Nat XFA With the opposition trying to impeach him and his popularity at an all-time low, President Robert Mugabe has lashed out at Zimbabwe's white minority, threatening genocide trials for all who fought against him in the independence war. Mugabe told supporters on Wednesday that Ian Smith, the white leader he helped overthrow two decades ago, and all whites who fought against black guerrillas would face trials for war crimes. Speaking as he arrived for a debate in Oxford on Thursday, Ian Smith responded to these latest threats, saying Mugabe's actions belonged to a man clinging onto the last vestiges of power. He challenged Mugabe to set up a truth and reconciliation committee, saying that he had nothing to fear. Arriving at Oxford Union Thursday night, the former white leader of the former British colony of Rhodesia, Ian Smith laughed off President Mugabe's latest threat to put him on the stand. Mugabe is calling for all whites who fought against black guerrillas to face trials for war crimes. Mugabe has said the nation's 70,000 whites - less than 1 percent of the population of 13 million - mostly opposed his government and had spurned offers of forgiveness and reconciliation. Smith rejected Mugabe threat, saying that the blame for the violence lay squarely on Mugabe's shoulders. SOUNDBITE: (English) "Well he is the one who should be put on trial for genocide isn't he, Mugabe -- not Smith." SUPER CAPTION: Ian Smith, former Rhodesian Prime Minister SOUNDBITE: (English) "Well because he killed so many people, massacred them by the thousands, I mean Gurugundi and Matabeleland land, when he massacred 30,000 Matabeleles, I never remember massacring a single person in my life." SUPERCAPTION: Ian Smith, former Rhodesian Prime Minister Smith said Mugabe's belligerent style of government had forced him into a corner - one which had made him desperate and dangerous. SOUNDBITE: (English) "He is in a state of panic, he doesn't know whether he is coming or going, he is like a wounded animal in a corner, dangerous and unpredictable. So I don't know what to say or what to think, it is difficult." SUPERCAPTION: Ian Smith, former Rhodesian Prime Minister When asked if he feared a trial, Smith openly challenged Mugabe to carry out his threats, saying he had nothing to fear. SOUNDBITE: (English) "No I would love it, let's get the truth, when your conscience is clear you have got no problem, have you?" SUPERCAPTION: Ian Smith, former Rhodesian Prime Minister However, when questioned if he felt any responsibility for the current state of the economy in Zimbabwe, Smith said the blacks had actually benefitted under British rule. SOUNDBITE: (English) "Certainly not, the black community will tell you they lived better under Smith than under Mugabe, they were brain washed by a communist propaganda machine into believing that things were going to improve, sadly they were taken for a ride." SUPERCAPTION: Ian Smith, former Rhodesian Prime Minister He said that the only way to establish the truth of Mugabe's accusations was to follow in the footsteps of South Africa's truth and reconciliation commission. SOUNDBITE: (English) I've challenged Mugabe to set up a commission of truth and reconciliation similar to the one they had in South Africa. My word I think that would frighten him if he had to face up to that thing, I would welcome it." SUPERCAPTION: Ian Smith, former Rhodesian Prime Minister Mugabe's threats come the same day a poll was released showing that 75 percent of Zimbabweans want Mugabe to resign and 51 percent want him prosecuted for human rights abuses. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/069628e97ab74f9de7351706fa46551a Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 201137 AP Archive
ZIMBABWE: BRUCE GROBBELAAR PLAYS FOR NATIONAL TEAM
 
02:53
Nat Sot Embattled goalkeeper Bruce Grobbelaar has taken his place in his country's team for the African Cup of Nations. It's his first major game since the allegations that he deliberately threw matches for bribes. He's playing for his home country of Zimbabwe, against Zaire. All eyes were on goalkeeper Bruce Grobbelaar when he ran out for his country in Harare Football fans in his home country of Zimbabwe were delighted to see their hero in his national kit. He was cleared on Saturday by the world football authority FIFA to play. FIFA came to the decision after examining a preliminary report by the English Football Association. The English tabloid newspaper "The Sun" alleged last week that Grobbelaar had taken bribes to fix matches, both for his former club - Liverpool - and for Southampton, the team he currently plays for. Earlier, FIFA had said it could ban the goalie if the F-A's report was damning. Since he arrived in Zimbabwe Grobbelaar has denied the allegations. And he added that they'd be unlikely to unsettle his game. There was a party atmosphere at the national sports stadium, with cheerleaders and a band. Some of the crowd chanted "Up with Bruce, down with Sun. The only pressure from fans in Harare is to stop any goals from Zaire and help Zimbabwe through to the next round of the African Cup of Nations. And in soaring temperatures, it was clearly thirsty work. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/f97aa9564333f5300ea3048cea65c494 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 61385 AP Archive
US President Obama arrives in Pretoria, meets South African President Zuma
 
02:26
AP TELEVISION 1. Wide of helicopter transporting US President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama coming into land 2. Tracking shot of Obama and Michelle Obama disembarking helicopter and getting into waiting vehicle US POOL 3. Pan across Obama motorcade arriving at Union Buildings, President Jacob Zuma and his wife, First Lady Thobeka Madiba-Zuma, waiting on steps 4. Cutaway of honour guards 5. Zoom in on Obamas getting out of vehicle, greeting Zuma and his wife, posing for photographs for media, then all walk up steps STORYLINE: US President Barack Obama met his South African counterpart in Pretoria. Obama flew in by helicopter with First Lady Michelle, before heading to the city's Union Buildings, where he was greeted by Jacob Zuma and his wife. They posed for photographs before heading inside the complex. Former South African leader Nelson Mandela, who remains in a critical condition in hospital, was inaugurated at the Union Buildings in 1994. He became the country's first black president after 27 years behind bars under racist rule. Obama plans to visit relatives of Mandela privately on Sarturday, but does not intend to see the critically ill anti-apartheid activist he has called a "personal hero." You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/79e0446cb680da8e3618161fcf5cc777 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 20898 AP Archive
South Africa-Mandela and Nyerere news conference
 
02:15
T/I 10:19:00 South Africa is willing to assist a peacekeeping force in eastern Zaire once leaders in the Great Lakes region agree on what they want, President Nelson Mandela said on Saturday (9/11). Mandela was speaking to reporters after being briefed on the situation in eastern Zaire by former Tanzanian president Julius Nyerere, who has taken on the role of central African peace-broker. SHOWS: JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA, 09/11 WS house; WS South African President Nelson Mandela and former Tanzanian president Julius Nyerere address news conference SOT Mandela: "We do understand the important role which South Africa is likely to play in an initiative of this nature and we want to be part of Africa not only geographically and politically but as part of our commitment and I am waiting for specific information from my leader here and as soon as we get it we'll be able to announce it here"'; C/A press; SOT Nyerere: "The whole of this exercise is an African exercise, this is an African problem. Obviously we don't have all the means otherwise we would not go outside Africa. We don't have all the means but nevertheless it is an African problem and clearly though the countries of the regions are the ones who have met for this problem, we can't envisage an African force seeking assistance from the outside world, we can't envisage a force that does not have South Africa"'; C/A press; SOT Mandela: "The supply of arms to Rwanda was influenced by humanitarian considerations that people who were unarmed are going to be victims of that party outside the border which is being trained and prepared to go back and commit those massacres. It is in that light that we took the decision to arm Rwanda with the consutation of the leaders in that region"; C/A press; Mandela and Nyerere walk back to house; Runs 2.14 You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/1f5525b54009664d056c81ebd1e079ad Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 134078 AP Archive
Queen addresses French Senate
 
03:59
1. Wide shot Senate courtyard with Republican guards 2. Various Queen Elizabeth II and Duke of Edinburgh arriving, being welcomed by President of Senate Christian Poncelet and President of the National Assembly Jean-Louis Debre 3. Military honours in senate courtyard 4. Queen Elizabeth II and Duke of Edinburgh entering senate 5. Mid shot Queen being applauded inside senate 6. Mid shot crowd applauding 7. Wide shot Queen, Christian Poncelet and Jean-Louis Debre arriving in room 8. Audience 9. SOUNDBITE (French) Queen Elizabeth II: "This anniversary gives a special meaning to my state visit, my fourth one to France. Looking back, it is the moment to celebrate the foresightedness of this agreement that laid the foundations for a decisive alliance that allowed both our countries to brave the difficult times of the twentieth century. Looking forward, it gives us the opportunity to put aside recent tensions and to rise to the challenge and the promises of tomorrow. Both our countries have chosen to make Europe and the European Union the main vector for their economic and political aspirations. This choice does not threaten friendship ties." 10. Cutaway audience listening 11. SOUNDBITE (French) Queen Elizabeth II: "This is about complimentary ties. More than ever we are committed to making the voice of Europe heard in the world and to give European diplomacy the military credibility it requires to allow the European Union, when necessary, to engage in military operations that NATO is not involved in." 12. Wide of audience applauding, and Queen STORYLINE: Queen Elizabeth II addressed the French Senate on Tuesday afternoon, on the second day of her state visit. The speech, in French, followed a packed day of engagements, including a visit to the Louvre museum, after lunch with French Prime Minister Jean-Pierre Raffarin and his wife in Matignon, the French Prime Minister''s residence. Earlier on, the Queen watched a performance by the elite Cadre Noir dressage team before going for a walk along the Rue Montorgueil, accompanied by Paris mayor Bertrand Delanoe. The monarch''s three-day trip marks the centennial of the Entente Cordiale, a colonial-era agreement that ended centuries of warring and hostility between France and Britain and paved the way for cooperation during two world wars. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/f1b47ab9dac8d4cc6c03f733aaf8d86c Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 174700 AP Archive
Sean Penn: Bradley Cooper remake of 'A Star is Born' is astonishing
 
02:54
(28 May 2018) SEAN PENN: BRADLEY COOPER REMAKE OF 'A STAR IS BORN' IS ASTONISHING The anticipated remake of "A Star is Born" doesn't premiere until October but it's already gaining buzz. The movie is the directorial debut of actor Bradley Cooper, who also stars in the film alongside Lady Gaga, who plays an aspiring singer - a role previously played by Judy Garland (the 1954 version) and Barbra Streisand (the 1976 version). A trailer premiered at CinemaCon in Las Vegas recently to applause from the crowd of theater owners and exhibitors and tweets of praise from journalists in attendance. One person who has seen an early screening is actor Sean Penn, who described it during a recent interview as "one of the best movies I've seen in I don't know how many years." "The acting is brilliant. Both, they are astonishing in it. And he as a director is the kind of artist that we had when I was kind of coming up as an audience. I knew he was a very talented actor, I did not know what was going on inside that guy's brain until I saw this movie and so that got – I'm really excited to see because: A, it's a great movie for a cinephile whose all about art films because it's all there. But that doesn't mean that everybody else isn't going to understand it and love it. This thing is like a Hal Ashby move. It's for everybody. It's a great movie for everybody instead of a pandering movie to make sure, for anybody." Cooper already has his next directing gig lined up, helming and starring in Leonard Bernstein biopic "Bernstein." Bernstein was named conductor of the New York Philharmonic orchestra at 25. He then wrote and composed the music for the film "West Side Story." A second movie about Bernstein is also in the works with Jake Gyllenhaal in the lead role. Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Archive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APArchives Google+: https://plus.google.com/b/102011028589719587178/+APArchive​ Tumblr: https://aparchives.tumblr.com/​​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/ You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/b2f29eaf26f625f6fccf7051c4b31d84
Views: 79156 AP Archive
Michelle Obama tells youngsters to work hard for success
 
03:12
(25 May 2011) SHOTLIST 1. Mid shot US First Lady taking questions from students from Elizabeth Garrett Anderson secondary school at Christ Church College, Oxford University 2. Cutaway of student asking question 3. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Obama, US First Lady: "If you are going to be a hard worker, hard work doesn't just appear, you have to practice hard work, you have to practice effort and I also encourage them and try to help them understand that good things don't come easy, with that effort, that's where you grow. Some of the best times of my life is when I have done something hard, when I have overcome a fear. You don't realise that when you are doing it but when you come out on the other side, you realise wow, I have really stepped up so I push my girls." 4. Wide of Michelle Obama talking 5. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Obama, US First Lady "That has been some of what has helped me be first lady, first of all, knowing who you are and being confident in yourself because there will be, Clarissa (addressing girl who asked a question) what did you say...pushing beyond other people's labels of you? That's a big part...that's what we do to each other all the time. We don't even know each other and we already determine from one glance, meeting, one line, one word, one phrase - 'this is who you are'. So you have to know who you are before that." 6. Close up Michelle Obama talking 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Obama, US First Lady "I knew he was a special person, and it had nothing to do with his education, it has nothing to do with his potential. I say this to young women, don't check off - there are a lot of women who check off the boxes. Did he go to the right school, what is his income, you know. It was none of that. It was how he felt about his mother, the love that he felt to his mother, his relationship to women, his work ethic. We worked together in a firm. He did his work, he was good and he was smart and I liked that. He was low key and wasn't impressed with himself and he was funny and we joked a lot and he loved his little sister...those were the things. And he was a community organiser. I really respected that. Here we are in a big law firm, right, and everybody was pushing to make money, he was one of the smartest students at Harvard Law School, one of the smartest associates in our firm. He had the chance to clerk for the Supreme Court and I thought well, you are definitely going to do that, right? Only a few people have the chance to do that and he was like, 'not really, I think I can do more work working with folks in churches.' And I was like, woa, that's different, it wasn't a line, he wasn't trying to impress me." 8. Wide shot Michelle Obama talking STORYLINE US First Lady Michelle Obama used her own life as an example of how hard work and perseverance can prevail on Wednesday as she spoke with students from a multiethnic school in an economically deprived area. The message to the 35 students touring the University of Oxford for the day was that even elite universities like Oxford are within their grasp. The first lady made a brief statement at the start of the meeting before taking questions from the students. When asked about her daughters' upbringing at the White House, she emphasised the importance of hard work. "Hard work doesn't just appear, you have to practice hard work, you have to practice effort and I also encourage them and try to help them understand that good things don't come easy, with that effort, that's where you grow, " she said. She said attitude towards hard work had helped her in her role as first lady, and stressed the importance of "pushing beyond" other people's preconceived ideas of who you are. the Elizabeth Garrett Anderson school in London. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/c81f5b81cb6313ebf4aa2c034e93376f Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 14734 AP Archive
Lebanon - Girl sheds tears of glass
 
02:06
T/I: 10:44:35 A family in Lebanon believes that their daughter has experienced a miracle from God. She sheds up to ten pieces of glass daily from her eye without causing any damage. Hasnaa Muslumani, a twelve year old girl who lives in Fakha, says the unusual phenomenon started on March 28th this year when she woke up one morning feeling pain in her eye and something come out. Her mother took her to hospital and Dr Ahmed Araji reportedly managed to take out three big pieces of glass from her eye. Since her return home, Hasnaa has reportedly shed around 7-8 pieces of glass daily without any apparent harm being done to the eye. While her parents claim it is a miracle from God, Dr Araji has a different explanation. He says the girl's father broke a glass near his daughters face a few months ago and believes that this incident may be responsible. SHOWS: FAKHA, LEBANON, RECENT Hasnaa Muslumani, seated with her parents, grandmother; Zoom to girl's eye as three fragments gradually appear; CU three fragments laid out; SOT in Arabic, Hasnaa Muslumani, telling her story; Father with pile of fragments he says came from his daughter's eye, pullout to show parents and girl seated; SOT Dr Ahmed Araji in English "The only way we can describe it is with an accident the glass has entered and now it is coming out, we cant say its a miracle the days of miracles have gone". Family walking in the garden. 2.05 You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/816d24ebcb842cb18bec4d5050bd3923 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 79285 AP Archive
SOUTH AFRICA: PRESIDENT MANDELA MAKES FINAL SPEECH AS ANC LEADER
 
03:25
(16 Dec 1997) Natural Sound South African President Nelson Mandela made his final speech as leader of the African National Congress at the party's 50th national conference on Tuesday. The conference marks the final step in the A-N-C's transition from a liberation movement to a political party. Deputy president Thabo Mbeki is expected to be the only candidate to replace Mandela as head of the A-N-C. The five-day conference will choose new leaders to replace the generation which led the African National Congress through its struggle for liberation. It will also decide on new policies to take the party - and South Africa - into the 21st century. The congress will see Nelson Mandela step down as A-N-C president after six years in which he has led his party through negotiations on ending white rule, the landmark 1994 elections and its first period governing the country. The conference is also expected to decide on final nominations for the top six party posts later on Tuesday. Mandela's deputy president, Thabo Mbeki, 55, is expected to be the only candidate to replace him, and will automatically be considered the new party president when the nominations close later today. Mbeki is expected to receive unanimous backing. A party atmosphere permeated the University of the North West campus in Mafeking. But while the scene suggested unity, the conference could see rifts grow in the A-N-C over leadership and policies. The only candidate to emerge so far for the deputy presidency - national chairman Jacob Zuma - may have to face a floor revolt from Mandela's ex-wife, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela. She proffered her famous raised-fist salute as she arrived on Tuesday and was cheered by about a dozen delegates. The A-N-C was expected to change its rules to make it more difficult for Madikizela-Mandela to be nominated by conference. At present such a nomination requires support from 10 per cent of the delegates by a show of hands. The new rules would increase this to 25 per cent - or 766 of the 3,064 voting delegates - who must sign seconding petitions. Madikizela-Mandela has been isolated for years by the mainstream A-N-C leadership because of her defiance of party discipline. Trouble could also come from discontented grassroots supporters of the A-N-C. Delegates representing impoverished blacks hungry for housing, power and jobs want more forceful policies and more pressure on wealthy whites to ease their situation. Some party leaders have warned that the A-N-C must start paying more attention to its members. In his final state of the A-N-C address, Nelson Mandela looked to the future. SOUNDBITE: (English) "Hopefully it will also assist the conference as it formulates both our policy position and the programme of action that will guide our activities in the period up to our next conference at the end of the twentieth century." SUPER CAPTION: Nelson Mandela, South African President Mandela will remain president of the country until 1999, when national elections are due. The A-N-C is expected to win, and the leaders chosen this week are almost certain to lead South Africa into the next century. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/c442d353d4d01b77693b8f948773dc1b Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 33755 AP Archive
David Bowie's musical 'Lazarus' set for European premiere
 
04:05
(3 Nov 2016) BOWIE MUSICAL 'LAZARUS' SET TO OPEN IN LONDON The European premiere of David Bowie's musical 'Lazarus,' which played a sold-out Off-Broadway run earlier this year in New York, is set for November 8. Original New York cast members Michael C. Hall, Michael Esper, and Sophia Anne Caruso are reprising their roles in director Ivo van Hove's production. Bowie died in January from cancer. He was able to see the New York show before his death at age 69. The play starring "Dexter" and "Six Feet Under" actor Michael C. Hall, was a hit since its previews and Bowie's death made tickets even harder to come by. Bowie wrote the musical with Irish playwright Enda Walsh as a sequel to the 1963 novel "The Man Who Fell to Earth" by Walter Tevis, which inspired the 1976 film of the same name that he starred in. Michael C Hall stars as Newton, the character famously portrayed by David Bowie in the 1976 screen adaptation directed by Nicolas Roeg. The play focuses on Newton as he remains still on Earth - a 'man' unable to die. The set list comprises some of Bowie's biggest hits _ including "Changes," "Heroes," "Absolute Beginners" and "Life on Mars" _ as well as new songs like "Lazarus," taken from Bowie's "Blackstar" album, released shortly before his death. Lazarus is scheduled to run in London through 22 January 2017. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/a05e0d4783374fceeedfc1db716513e0 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 47659 AP Archive
Royal family members attend funeral of Princess Margaret
 
02:37
(15 Feb 2002) 1. Wide shot of Windsor Castle 2. Various of Queen Mother arriving in people carrier 3. Princess Margaret's children - David, Viscount Linley, and Lady Sarah Chatto 4. Royal Family walking down road toward chapel doors - pictures include, Princes Charles, William and Harry, Prince Andrew, Prince Edward with wife Sophie, and Princess Anne. 5. Queen Elizabeth II's car arriving 7. Queen getting out of car with husband, Prince Philip. The pair walk past brick wall toward chapel. 8. Wide shot of coffin in chapel 9. Coffin with a guard standing at each end 10. Coffin with roses on top 11. Side shot of coffin with guards at either end 12. Coffin being down castle stairs 13. Coffin being carried towards hearse, coming to a halt 14. Queen, Prince Philip, and David, Viscount Linley, and Lady Sarah Chatto watching from castle steps. Queen wipes a tear from her eye. 16. Front shot of Scots guards playing bagpipes accompanying the hearse through the castle gates into the streets of Windsor, well-wishers watching from behind barricades. STORYLINE: Members of the British royal family bid a final farewell to Princess Margaret at Windsor Castle on Friday, 50 years after her father, King George VI, was buried nearby. The service at Saint George's Chapel was private, though a subdued crowd of nearly three thousand wellwishers had gathered outside the gates. The principal mourners were Margaret's children, Viscount Linley and Lady Sarah Chatto, along with the queen, Prince Philip, Prince Charles and Margaret's former husband, the Earl of Snowdon. The 101-year-old Queen Mother arrived in a people carrier and entered the building through a different entrance to the rest of her family. Some 450 people, including more than 30 royals, attended the funeral service for the 71-year-old younger sister of Queen Elizabeth II. The princess's rose-covered coffin was shrouded in her red, blue and gold-coloured personal standard during the funeral service. Following cremation at nearby Slough Crematorium, Margaret's ashes were to be placed in the Royal Vault at Saint George's Chapel. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/9dc316c7c847abd949909bb65bf7e013 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 574305 AP Archive
Eastern Slavonia - Serbs Stone US Ambassador
 
02:07
T/I: 11:08:22 An angry and embittered group of Croatian Serb refugees shouted abuse and stoned the motorcade of Madeleine Albright, US Ambassador to the UN, during her tour of the war-shattered town of Vukovar in Eastern Slavonia on Thursday afternoon (21/3). The US envoy flew in on Thursday morning into Erdut, accompanied by the US Ambassador to Croatia Peter Galbraith, and the UNTAES administrator Jacques Paul Klein. But as Ambassador Albright visited the local marketplace in Vukovar, she was forced to cut short her round as she was mobbed by a crowd of Croatian Serb refugees shouting "bitch" and "fascist". SHOWS: EASTERN SLAVONIA 21/3 ERDUT Madeleine Albright arriving in Erdut for meeeting with local Serb officials Albright accepting offers of bread, plum brandy and flowers according to Serb custom inside Erdut town hall, Albright accompanied by US Ambassador Galbraith and administrator of UNTAES Jacques Paul Klein Albright speaking VUKOVAR Albright arrives in Vukovar Angry mob gathering and shouting "Croats are over on the other side", crowd "booing" Albraight saying: "Let's get out of here, this is not nice." walking about Vukovar, again stones being thrown at Albright's motorcade angry locals stones being thrown at Albright's motorcade locals shouting: "my brother died for Vukovar", "fascist", jeering and mob scenes motorcade stopping en route to village Ilok in Eastern Slavonia Albright and her delegation inspecting damage observing broken windows of two cars police, UN soldiers Albright standing by on the road Galbraith asking journalists if they are all right and if anyone was left behind close-up shots of damaged cars and car ILOK Croatian refugees gathered in front of Ilok church Albright greeting Croat refugees and entering church statement by Albright after coming out from the church, in English: saying it didn't surpise her that those who supported the destruction of Vukovar might not like her Albright motorcade leaves to jeering 2.06 ends. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/696592d20d009a82059e18e26da6da78 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 30710 AP Archive
Car built from scrap modelled on BMW
 
02:34
(7 Feb 2005) 1. Dirt road through Makapanstad village 2. Johannes Monene driving the MMW through village 3. Tight shot side view of car driving 4. Tight shot Johannes at the wheel of the MMW 5. Johannes driving into village 6. Friends gathered around car 7. Cutaway people watching 8. Friend getting into car for ride 9. Close up of exhaust pipe 10. Johannes driving off with passenger, people waving 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Johannes Monenes "This car took...." 12. People admiring car 13. Close up of number plate 14. Johannes opening car bonnet 15. Various of Johhanes working on engine 16. Indicator lights at back of car flashing 17. Close up of gear stick 18. Close up of hand operating electric window control 19. Window going down 20. Wide of Johannes operating electric windows 21. Close up of hand turning switch on 22. Electric hand waving at back of car 23. Various of Johannes in car driving along tarmac road 24. Car entering village, head lights turn on 25. Johannes driving car down road in village SUGGESTED LEAD-IN: South Africa has come a long way since the end of apartheid just over a decade ago. But modern technology and higher education remain out of the reach of many black South Africans. It's a country where resourcefulness mixed with a little technical know-how goes a long way. The townships of post-apartheid South Africa are producing a generation of innovators with dreams of a better life. In Makapanstad, north of Pretoria, one young man has built his own car - out of scrap. VOICE-OVER: A dusty road runs through the village of Makapanstad, 150 kilometres north of South Africa's administrative capital, Pretoria. Here, incomes are low, unemployment high and university education out of reach for most people. But that did not stop Johannes Monene from turning his dream into reality. The 22-year-old wanted to build his own car and now he has - out of junk. Johannes began collecting scrap metal around his village two years ago, determined to build his car. The doubters advised him to stop wasting his time. Today Monene drives around his village in a bright blue handmade car he calls his MMW Z2 -- and everyone wants a ride. SOUNDBITE (English) "This car took me two years, almost two years and I had to struggle to make this car because I did not have materials in the first place. I had to look for materials down there around my village, I had to face people to find materials, I had to beg them. And because they are saints they did give me some materials. Some I had to buy with my money and then this is what I did at the end." The car has been modelled on Johannes favourite vehicle, the BMW - which stands for Bavaria Motor Works. Monene jokes that his car comes from the Makapanstad Motor Works - MMW. It has a 1400cc Nissan engine... ...customised indicator lights.... ...and manual gear shift. Johannes even worked out how to install electric windows. A unique feature is the waving hand he has wired in to the back window. It's a wonderful example of ingenuity and determination. Johannes hasn't got the right qualifications for his next dream... the former maths and science student could not afford to go to university. But he hopes to one day work as a mechanic for BMW. In the meantime he is planning to put a roof on his car and continues to search the scrapyards near his village for accessories to add to his beloved MMW. Keyword: Wacky You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/5211c7bdf326db9dd933f8b964eccb9c Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 70631 AP Archive
Bentley gift for Queen's Golden Jubilee
 
03:18
1. Wide shot Windsor Castle 2. New Bentley limousine covered in cloth 3. Queen Elizabeth emerges to see limousine 4. Bentley is unveiled 5. Royal crest 6. Queen inspects her new limousine 7. Queen reflected in wheel cap, pan up to Queen herself 8. Bentley being driven out of garage 9. Bentley being polished 10. Interior of vehicle 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Sarah Perris, Bentley communications director "This is a complete one off. It's been built from the ground up exclusively for Her Majesty the Queen. It's the first time ever that a state limousine has ever been designed - interior, exterior, chassis - from the ground up for a member of the British royal family." 12. SOUNDBITE (German) Franz-Josef Paefgen, Chairman, Bentley Motors "It's always something very special if you do a car for a king or queen, and specially for the English queen. This is a great car, six metres long, weighing four tonnes, and it has impressive acceleration." 13. SOUNDBITE (English) Franz-Josef Paefgen, Chairman, Bentley Motors "It's always something very special if you do a car for a king or queen, and specially for the English queen. For a company like us, it's the most important thing you can imagine. " 14. Chauffeur enters limousine, drives it away STORYLINE: Britain's Queen Elizabeth received a special Jubilee gift on Wednesday - a new state limousine courtesy of the Bentley motor company. The vehicle was crafted by hand and took two years to build. It's worth around 250-thousand dollars. Bentley is one of the most famous names in British motoring, although it's now owned by the German company Volkswagen. The new limousine will be used for the first time on Tuesday when the Queen leaves St Paul's Cathedral after a Thanksgiving service to mark 50 years on the throne. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/55730b51039c1a5617190fd8dca14585 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 174561 AP Archive
Arnold Schwarzenegger election victory speech
 
02:44
1. Wide shot of Arnold Schwarzenegger and Maria Shriver walking onto stage during rally 2. Wide shot of rally 3. Crowd applauding 4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Arnold Schwarzenegger, California Governor-Elect: "I've heard your voices loud and clear. We have... tough choices ahead. The first choice that we must make is the one that will determine our success. Shall we rebuild our state together or shall we we fight amongst ourselves creating deeper division and fail the people of California. Well let me tell you something, the answer is clear. For the people to win politics as usual must lose." 5. Wide shot of rally 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Arnold Schwarzenegger, California Governor-Elect: "I will reach out to Republicans to Democrats and independents. To those who supported the recall and those who did not. Those who supported me today and those who did not. I want reach out to everybody; to young and old, rich and poor, people of all religions, all colours and all nationalities. I want to be the governor for the people. I want to represent everybody." 7. Wide shot of rally 8. Close shot of people at rally 9. Shriver and Schwarzeneggger waving to crowd 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Vox pop, Schwarzenegger supporter: "I think he can be effective. Because what you need is someone who has leadership qualities and someone who can make, you know, the right decisions, someone who also quite frankly surrounds himself with pretty smart people. And I think he can do that." 11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Vox pop, Schwarzenegger supporter: "I think California is really fed up. They've been fed up with this whole system. And what you mentioned before about no political experience, maybe that's what we need is something fresh and something new." 12. Schwarzenegger waving STORYLINE: Republican Arnold Schwarzenegger celebrated victory in the race to become California governor with hundreds of cheering supporters, including members of America's most prominent Democratic family on Tuesday. Standing hand-in-hand with his wife, Kennedy family member Maria Shriver, with her parents, Sargent Shriver and Eunice Kennedy Shriver, close by Schwarzenegger said he wanted to represent all the people of California. Speaking at the Century Plaza Hotel ballroom Schwarzenegger said he had received a gracious phone call from Governor Gray Davis conceding his defeat. Schwarzenegger pledged to bring jobs back to the state, improve education and restore trust in government, and urged his opponents to join him in solving California's problems. Earlier, as televisions in the ballroom monitored Davis' concession speech, the crowd of about 1,000 applauded when Davis said voters had decided it was time for someone else to serve as governor. Schwarzenegger raised at least 21.5 (m) million US dollars for the race, some 10 (m) million US dollars of which from his own pocket. The celebration must quickly give way to planning for a lightning-fast transition that will take place as soon as the election is certified, and no later than November 15. Schwarzenegger's campaign co-chairman, Republican David Dreier, will lead his transition team, campaign spokesman Todd Harris said. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/f7a32cdd947c7259747fa38b4e427272 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 68473 AP Archive
UK QUEEN HOSTS JUBILEE LUNCH FOR SOVEREIGN MONARCHS
 
03:19
(18 May 2012) Britain has come under criticism for inviting the king of Bahrain, whose Gulf state has been engaged in a brutal crackdown on political dissent, to a lunch on Friday celebrating Queen Elizabeth II's Diamond Jubilee. The lunch in Windsor Castle was the largest gathering of foreign royals in Britain since Queen Elizabeth II's grandson, Prince William, was married to Kate Middleton last year. Then, as now, the decision to extend an invitation to members of the Bahraini royal family has angered whose who are upset by the deadly violence deployed against demonstrators since protests erupted in the Gulf state. Bahrain's Crown Prince Salman bin Hamad Al Khalifa eventually skipped the royal wedding, saying he didn't want the controversy to tarnish the couple's happy day. But on Friday Buckingham Palace confirmed that his father, King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa, attended the queen's lunch, along with some 45 other royal guests from around the world. The Foreign Office, which advised Buckingham Palace on the invitations, said that Britain's ties to Bahrain allowed UK officials to talk frankly with the strategic island nation's rulers about "a range of issues including those where we have concerns." Al Khalifa wasn't the only controversial guest dining at Windsor Castle. Swaziland's King Mswati III, who is accused of living in luxury while his people go hungry, also attended the lunch. Other guests included Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands; Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko of Japan; the Emir of Qatar Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani and Saudi Arabia's Prince Mohammed bin Nawwaf bin Abdulaziz al Saud. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry also attended the lunch. The Diamond Jubilee marks 60 years of Elizabeth's reign as Britain's monarch. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/cb51ef8230e8f3ab8cfbe66bd6eb85f3 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 128827 AP Archive
SYND 5-6-72 FUNERAL OF LATE DUKE OF WINDSOR
 
02:06
(5 Jun 1972) The funeral at Windsor Castle of the late Duke of Windsor, the former King George VI. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/6e7af5478bfc8362cf741ea662ca5495 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 109827 AP Archive
Chirac says no to any second resolution authorising war
 
02:02
1. Reporter asking question 2. SOUNDBITE: (France) Jacques Chirac, French President: "I'll tell you what my feeling is. My belief is that tonight this resolution, which carries an ultimatum - and therefore presenting an international slide towards war - does not have a majority of nine votes." Question: So France doesn't need to use its veto? Chirac: "Apart from that, which is exactly right, France will naturally have a part to play. There are the nations that are voting no, therefore France, there are those who will abstain and in that case there won't be a majority. So in this case there won't be the problem of a veto." Question: And if that's not the case? Chirac: "So, in the second instance, of course people change their minds and according to what I believe are their sentiments at this time and in this case there could easily be a majority of nine or more votes who are for the new resolution - the one which authorises war. In this case France will vote no. But there is a characteristic, that's what one would call the reality of using a veto, that's if one of the members of the Permanent Five, that's the United States, England, Russia, China, France, votes no, even if there is a a majority then the resolution won't be adopted. That's what one would call the right of veto." Question: What's your main position at the moment? Chirac: "No matter what the circumstances we will vote 'no', because it considers, at this time, that there is no place for going to war to achieve the objective that we all want at the moment, that is the disarmament of Iraq." 3. Reporter on camera 4. Wide aerial Chirac talking to the two reporters STORYLINE: President Jacques Chirac said on Monday that France was prepared to veto the US-backed resolution on Iraq if necessary, joining Russia in saying it would vote against giving Saddam Hussein until March 17 to disarm. Chirac said in a televised interview that France would vote against any resolution that contains an ultimatum leading to war: "No matter what the circumstances we will vote 'no.'" It was the first time Chirac explicitly said France would use its veto power as a permanent member of the UN Security Council to block the United States' quest for world body approval for war. However, Chirac also indicated the veto might not be needed because the resolution does not have the nine Security Council votes needed for passage. "Tonight this resolution, which carries an ultimatum ... does not have a majority of nine votes," Chirac said. Chirac's statements came shortly after Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov said Russia - another veto-wielding Security Council member - would vote against the US-British UN resolution. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/300a41655c6dc1c15bc9311b601996dc Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 7195 AP Archive
President Clinton and Boris Yeltsin laugh attack
 
08:40
(1 Sep 2003) USA: PRESIDENT CLINTON AND BORIS YELTSIN PRESS CONFERENCE - LAUGH ATTACK You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/bd276c0564b0f3e84910cfd8fa1eb480 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 104719 AP Archive
VICE PRESIDENT JOSHUA NKOMO DIES AGED 82
 
02:43
English/Nat Vice President Joshua Nkomo, the father of Zimbabwe's fight for independence from white colonial rule, has died. He was 82. Nkomo suffered from prostate cancer, and poor health forced him to largely withdraw from political life last year. Thandiwe Nkomo, Nkomo's daughter, said he died around 1:30 a-m local time at Harare's main hospital, on Thursday. Joshua Nkomo was regarded by many as the guiding light of the nation's black nationalist movement, which fought a guerrilla war against white colonial rule for nearly three decades in the former British colony of Rhodesia. But the traditional leader of the minority Ndebele tribe failed to achieve his goal of becoming the first black leader when Rhodesia became independent Zimbabwe in 1980. Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe, a longtime lieutenant of Nkomo in the nationalist movement, formed a coalition, appointing him in 1980 to the post of Home Affairs Minister in charge of police and internal security. But the alliance was short-lived. In February 1982, Mugabe accused Nkomo of plotting a coup and fired him and three ministers of his Zimbabwe African People's Union party. SOUNDBITE: (English) "I have suffered, I have worked so hard for this county, before independence, and I have worked so hard to make independence stick. And now this man turns round and calls himself a traitor. Me, a traitor- a man who has worked so hard for his county. There is no insult to beat this." SUPER CAPTION: Joshua Nkomo, Nkomo's passport was seized and he was restricted to his home city of Bulawayo in western Zimbabwe. Fighters professing loyalty to Nkomo mounted an armed rebellion. Nkomo saw his sacking as a personal act of revenge by Mugabe. SOUNDBITE: (English) "I have never done anything wrong and Robert (Mugabe) knows this. I tell you, this is for personal power. Let him stand up and deny this. He is frightened of me and my stature and is frightened that he will not win the next election. That is what he is doing- trying to smear me. It is very very sly and very dirty. You don't expect (this) of a president of a country." SUPER CAPTION: Joshua Nkomo Mugabe brutally crushed the insurrection with troops drawn mostly from his majority Shona tribe. Nkomo denied direct links with the rebels, but fled into exile by crossing the Botswana border on foot and in disguise after government troops ransacked his home and killed his driver. He returned to Zimbabwe to negotiate an end to the rebellion and in 1988 signed a peace accord with Mugabe. He rejoined the government as vice president. Joshua Mqabuko Nyongolo Nkomo was born on June 19, 1917. As a young man, he worked as a truck driver and carpenter to raise money for his education in South Africa. On returning to Rhodesia, Nkomo rose through the ranks of youth movements and labour unions to form and lead the African National Congress, the nation's first black nationalist political party, in 1952. In 1957, the African National Youth League merged with Nkomo's ANC and the new group, named the National Democratic Party, elected him president. Colonial authorities banned the NDP five years later. Nkomo reformed it as ZAPU, which was also immediately banned. But as Britain granted independence to its other African colonies in the early 1960s, rivalries in the nationalist movement erupted into violence. Nkomo, Mugabe and other black activist leaders were detained. Rhodesian Prime Minister Ian Smith declared unilateral independence from Britain in 1965 to retain white rule. Nkomo and Mugabe were to remain in detention for ten years. Those talks failed. Nkomo remained in Zambia and two years later merged his guerrilla army with Mugabe's Mozambique-based fighters under the banner of the Patriotic Front. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/d53764a60aab0f6cb45a81f7c343726c Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 22095 AP Archive
Colin Farrell and Martin McDonagh discuss the dark comedy
 
07:13
London, 10 August 2012 6 mins approx 1. Sitdown interview with Colin Farrell and Martin McDonagh including the following soundbites: "I didn't feel any pressure because of how well 'In Bruges' did in certain aspects, at all. So there was the familiarity of already having worked together and knowing Martin (McDonagh) for 10 years but there was also just a freshness of having this new experience as well, because the script was...it didn't feel anything like 'In Bruges' and the character I played in this felt completely different. Like if I had of played Billy it would have been closer to Ray, in 'In Bruges,' who was, you know, constantly saying what seemingly socially were inappropriate things and acting in kind of violent ways, kind of almost a fractured character who capsulated a load of different characters in one guy, but I was playing something completely different, so it was a new experience of discovery for me within a very familiar framework of working with this man." "No. No, it's much easier than that. I wrote it in London rather than L.A. and it wasn't on commission, it was just me burrowing away, just thinking about crazy stuff. So no, my lifestyle isn't like the lifestyle of the writer that you play who has my name in the film. No, it's much more...it's probably less exciting but it's probably easier to do." Reporter: "Slightly less dangerous for a start?" Martin McDonagh: "Yes. It's much more sexy my way." "I loved working with him. He's just brilliant. He's just so unique and I grew up watching so many of his films and so if you ever get the chance to work with someone who's work you've admired for years, you feel like you have a bit of a relationship with them already - all be it a one sided relationship if you're aware of it, if you're not then you're insane - so I had a one-sided relationship with him already and then I met him. I was nervous working with him, so much respect there and so much fondness and that familiarity, which is based on an illusion. Of course you meet the person and they sound the same but you don't know anything about them. He was just wonderful to watch work, every single scene, every single word that he uttered was just so interesting that at times is was hard not to just get caught up as a fan in the scene. And yet there is such a uniqueness to that man that there's a certain part of that that was ok in the scene as well because the character I was playing would find the character that Chris (Walken) was playing odd because of the things he was saying and the way he was saying them, so it was kind of trying to find the balance between how much can I go (pulls face) and how much of that is Colin (Farrell) just going (pulls face). How much of it is the character?" "The dog was genius." Martin McDonagh: "The best of all of us." Colin Farrell: "The dog was the most professional actor on the set, any given day. Really was." Martin McDonagh: "Quiet as a mouse the whole time." Colin Farrell: "Quiet as a mouse, which is unusual for a dog, but it really was. Bonny the Shih Tzu. Chris (Walken) fell in love with the dog. They had a really good relationship." "When you're story boarding or directing those scenes you want them to be as cinematic or as graphic or as true actually. You want to explore the truth of how awful violence is and then be able to comment on it, so it was, strangely it's all ketchup-y blood, so you're adding all that stuff and you're making sure the prosthetics...so it's just, the details of it when you're working first hand, it's fun and silly. It's only when it's cut together that it looks so appalling." "Yes, we're looking for seven. Colin Farrell: "I told you to shoot it in black and white, you f**ker." FURTHER RESTRICTIONS: none USED FOR STORIES # : You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/f47d909cacf10958b8bb21ab534469bb Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 13353 AP Archive
David Bowie is...’ exhibition makes last, and largest stop, at Brooklyn Museum
 
05:23
(28 Feb 2018) 'DAVID BOWIE IS' EXHIBITION MAKES LAST, AND LARGEST STOP, AT BROOKLYN MUSEUM Five years after premiering in London, a comprehensive David Bowie exhibit is making its last and most potent stop when it opens at the Brooklyn Museum in New York on Friday (2 MARCH). "David Bowie is" will be one of the biggest the museum has ever done. It includes iconic costumes, video footage, and some offbeat items too. Victoria Broackes, from the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, co-curated the exhibit. She explains how Bowie was chosen for the initial 2013 exhibition. "We actually had Bowie on the top of a really short list of people we wanted to cover as a single artist subject at the VNA. But there was very little material, just a couple of collections in the UK, and that was because Bowie had it all, and he had been amassing it over many years. And then in the last ten years or so he was actually buying back material whereas ever came onto the market, which was rarely. So that is so unusual.  I don't know of another artist it's not just a pop artist but he has an archive of 75,000 objects going back to childhood. That is exceptional, "Broackes said. Matthew Yokobosky designed the space at the museum for the massive showing. But when it's over, he's not sure if there's going to be a more permanent place for the material. "The final venue for this exhibition, which is why it had to be just even a little bit more over the top. And you know, what will happen with David's material after is still being discussed." The material includes costumes from many of the Bowie's iconic looks, including Ziggy Stardust, Aladdin Sane, Halloween Jack, Major Tom, and the Thin White Duke. Broackes said that these personas were important to Bowie, because they allowed him to go beyond the music. "We're standing in the video section of the exhibition where we look at how Bowie really from his earliest days was interested in how the music looked, as well as how it sounded. And we have the famous 'Ashes to Ashes' costume by Natasha Korniloff, which she worked - she was a particular dance designer, and worked with Bowie going right back into the early days in the late 60s and 70s. And he worked with her again in 1980 for that video, which you know, we have to think it predates MTV. But Bowie was ahead of the pack in videos, as well as most other things," Broackes said. The exhibition includes approximately 500 objects, including 60 performance costumes, photographs, posters, handwritten lyrics, and videos. Yokobosky highlighted some of the must-see areas, which include many of Bowie's influences. "Yeah, you definitely want to hit the music video room, where the entire room is designed like a lightning bolt. You want to hit the black and white years, which the walls are painted to look like the set from this late 70s concert. You definitely want to look for the early material of influence, from German theater, Japanese theater - I mean, he studied a lot." "David Bowie is" opens on Friday (2 MARCH) and runs through July 15. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/1fefd8209a6beacc7eac75df3e5394ac Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 3414 AP Archive
Obama meets Queen Elizabeth II at Windsor Castle
 
00:57
(22 Apr 2016) US President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama on Friday met Britain's Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip for lunch at the royal residence of Windsor Castle. Obama is on a three-day visit to the UK, likely the last to the country of his presidency. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/c9a80041b0db233a55967fadcc079ea3 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 1253997 AP Archive
KENYA: NAIROBI: PRESIDENT DANIEL ARAP MOI SWORN IN UPDATE (2)
 
01:56
Natural Sound Kenyan President Daniel arap Moi was sworn in for his fifth and final five-year term on Monday. Presidents Yoweri Museveni of Uganda and Benjamin Mkapa of Tanzania, attended the ceremony in a show of support for one of Africa's longest-serving leaders. The Kenyan President was out at the Nairobi airport to greet his African neighbours - the presidents of Tanzania and Uganda - on Monday. They were in Kenya to attend his swearing-in for another five year term. First to arrive was President Benjamin Mkapa of Tanzania followed by Yoweri Museveni - the President of Uganda. The East African leaders came to join in the celebrations in a symbolic gesture of support for the 73-year-old President Moi. Five thousand Kenyans, some carrying posters of Moi, also crowded onto a grassy hill overlooking Nairobi's Uhuru Park to watch their president be sworn in. It was in this park where President Daniel arap Moi, one of Africa's longest-serving leaders, first took the oath of office following the death of Jomo Kenyatta in 1978. Moi first inspected a guard of honour made up of members of the 70th Battalion of the Kenyan army, which prevented a coup against Moi in 1982. Then the 73-year-old ruler was sworn in by Chief Justice Zaccheus Chesoni. During the ceremony he swore to perform the duties of the president of the Republic of Kenya faithfully, and "with commitment and clear conscience" and he said he would "champion all the people according to the law without fear, favour or hatred". Moi's swearing-in comes after last week's chaotic election. It ran for an unprecedented second day and was marred by charges of rigging and eight deaths in political violence. Moi's two nearest challengers - Mwai Kibaki, his vice president for a decade, and Raila Odinga, son of an independence leader - rejected Moi's victory and called for a new vote. But on Sunday, the Electoral Commission Chairman Samuel Kivuitu officially confirmed what unofficial results already had shown - that Moi had won with 40 percent of the vote. But Moi remains unpopular with most Kenyans - 60 percent didn't vote for him but instead chose one of 13 challengers. Critics blame Moi for rampant corruption and inept management that have badly damaged this once prosperous former British colony's economy. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/995a2e0bac90db1ccf80e3429f5eae2e Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 76513 AP Archive
President Bush ducks as man throws shoes at him in protest
 
00:51
George W Bush got a size-10 reminder of the fervent opposition to his policies when a man threw two shoes at him - one after another - during a news conference with Iraq Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki. 1. US President George W. Bush speaking at podium, standing next to Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki 2. Zoom out, Bush shaking hands with al-Maliki 3. Bush starting to speak, man identified as Muntadar al-Zeidi, correspondent for Al-Baghdadiya television, stands up and throws shoe at Bush, Bush ducks. Pull back wide, man throws second shoe, Bush ducks. Security hold man on the floor UPSOUND: shouting 4. Slow Motion sequence of man throwing shoes STORYLINE His legacy forever linked to an unpopular war, President George W. Bush visited Iraq under intense security on Sunday and declared that the long, hard conflict was necessary to protect the United States and give Iraqis hope. But he got a size-10 reminder of the fervent opposition to his policies when a man threw two shoes at him - one after another - during a news conference with Iraq Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki. This is the end," shouted the man, later identified as Muntadar al-Zeidi, a correspondent for Al-Baghdadiya television, an Iraqi-owned station based in Cairo, Egypt. Bush ducked both throws. Neither leader was hit. In Iraqi culture, throwing shoes at someone is a sign of contempt - Iraqis whacked a statue of Saddam Hussein with their shoes after US Marines toppled it to the ground after the 2003 invasion. "All I can report," Bush joked after the incident, "is a size 10." The US president visited the Iraqi capital just 37 days before he hands the war off to President-elect Barack Obama, who has pledged to end it. Keyword wacky bizarre You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/afc0913af6350bb0621a548d9e1a1b4e Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 38804 AP Archive
SYND 20 3 75 THE FUNERAL OF ARISTOTLE ONASSIS
 
02:19
(18 Mar 1975) Aristotle Onassis' funeral on his private island, Skorpios, after being carried off his yacht. The mourners include Jackie Onassis and his daughter Christina. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/6620f7d9db781452f6278aa72375d47b Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 43702 AP Archive
SYND 21 9 77 FUNERAL OF SINGER MARIA CALLAS, IN PARIS
 
01:37
(20 Sep 1977) Funeral of singer Maria Callas, in Paris: Friends and admirers of New York-born prima donna, Maria Callas, gathered at Paris's small Greek Orthodox church on Tuesday (20/9/77) to give the soprano her last ovation. A crowd of about 600 admirers burst into cries of "bravo maria" and thundered applause when the soprano's coffin was carried to a waiting hearse at the end of a simple 40-minute service You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/2daea413c361299a014bd20d81c51f94 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 36826 AP Archive
Feature on firehouse that lost most of their team during 9/11
 
05:19
Midtown Manhattan - 29 August 2006 1. Medium shot firefighters in putting on fire gear 2. Medium shot firefighter putting on gear 3. Wide pan fire engine coming out of station garage 4. Wide pan fire engine pulling away 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Captain James McGlynn, Engine 34, Ladder 21: "On 9/11 I was working with Engine 39. At 8:52 we were assigned to respond to the Trade Center." 3. Close up fax ordering Engine 34 to respond to "1 Worldtrade Center" on 9/11/01 at 0900 4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Captain James McGlynn, Engine 34, Ladder 21: "We were assigned to walk up stairway B. We made it to the 31st floor when the building began to shake. We found out much later that that shaking was the south tower coming down." Downtown Manhattan - 11 September 2001 5. Wide World Trade Center south tower collapsing Midtown Manhattan - 29 August 2006 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Captain James McGlynn, Engine 34, Ladder 21: "That caused us to exit the building. We made it down to the lobby. At which point the north tower came down and trapped us in the B stairway for about five hours." Downtown Manhattan - 12 September 2001 7. Aerial shot of ground zero 8. More of the same Downtown Manhattan - 11 September 2001 9. Rescue workers at ground zero 10. More of the same Midtown Manhattan - 29 August 2006 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Captain James McGlynn, Engine 34, Ladder 21: "You just draw on your training, and I guess the faith that you know that the Fire Department is out there and they're coming to get you. That, you knew that once contact was made and they were aware of our location that nothing was going to stop them from coming to get us." Downtown Manhattan - 11 September 2001 11. Wide shot fire truck headed through dust down street 12. Wide shot cloud of smoke and dust over buildings in Manhattan Midtown Manhattan - 29 August 2006 13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Captain James McGlynn, Engine 34, Ladder 21: "It makes you feel I guess kind of privileged that you were able to survive, and I guess it just makes you I guess want to live a better life." 14. Pan McGlynn walking by line of photos of fire fighters who died Sept. 11, 2001 15. Close up of photograph fallen firefighter William Krukowski 16. Close up photograph of fallen firefighter Lt. Michael Fodor 17. Close up photograph of fallen firefighter Keith Glascoe 18. Close up badges from fire departments whose officers worked at Ground Zero 19. Medium shot fire helmets on shelf, of men who died on 9/11 20. Wide fire truck backing into station garage 21. SOUNDBITE: (English) Firefighter James McNally, Engine 34, Ladder 21: "September 11, 2001, I was relieved from duty about 8:15 in the morning. I was in a hurry to get home. I usually catch a train, an 8:35 train. My wife was pregnant at the time with my son James." 22. Close up sign reading, "Hell's Kitchen FDNY, Engine 34, Ladder 21" 23. SOUNDBITE: (English) Firefighter James McNally, Engine 34, Ladder 21: "All of us were called back in to duty and naturally we all wanted to help out. So I got in my car and drove back to the City, and by the time I got here there was bunker gear missing. People were just grabbing, firemen that were off duty were grabbing bunker gear and heading down there. They brought us down in city buses. And we started to do our searches. We were getting reports of people that were trapped in voids and making phone calls from their cell phones." Downtown Manhattan - 14 September 2001 24. Medium fire fighters walking down street Downtown Manhattan - 12 September 2001 25. Wide shot tractors removing tower rubble Midtown Manhattan - 29 August 2006 26. Medium shot photos of firefighters who died 27. Medium shot firefighter helmets on shelf, of men who died on 9/11 STORYLINE: You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/40f4ec99770532ff4d65443e49f5d4e0 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 32304 AP Archive
CZECH REPUBLIC: PRAGUE: ORLOJ CLOCK
 
02:51
Czech/Nat While the toll of midnight may potentially throw the world's clocks and computers into chaos, there is one time piece which will definitely have no problem. The Orloj's (pronounced OR-loy) spectacular tolling of the hours on the Old Town Square in Prague is watched by thousands of tourists every day, making it one of Europe's most famous clocks. This is the heart of ``Magic Prague,'' the Old Town Square, magnet for the nearly four million tourists who visit Prague every year. And at the centre of the Square is the six hundred year old Orloj, the clock on the old town hall that draws the most sightseers. Each day at the top of the hour hundreds gather beneath the clock to watch the tolling of the hour. What is mundane on an ordinary clock is a magnificent display of medieval technology at work. Otakar Zamecnik (OHT-ahk-ar ZAH-mech-neek) is the Orlojnik, or the keeper of the Orloj. For nearly two decades he has been making weekly visits to the clock to make sure it doesn't miss the hour. He say that while the Y2K problem might throw other timepieces into a spin, the bug will definitely have no effect on the Orloj. SOUNDBITE: (Czech) ``The year two thousand definitely can not have any affect on the Orloj because it is not run by a computer. It has been here for six hundred years and can run for six hundred more.'' SUPERCAPTION: Otakar Zamecnik, Orlojnik It is the way it tolls the hour for the past 600 years that is so special. What happens inside might only be of interest to the expert horologist, but from the square below, it is a spectacle to behold. The twelve apostles each make an appearance, peeking out of two windows high above the crowd below. And below tiny figurines move and ring bells and the golden rooster crows. The show only lasts a few minutes, but it's a show that's been happening since the 14th century, and the crowd always seems pleased. And while Y2K bug may potentially throw air travel into chaos and set off nuclear missiles, in Prague on New Year's Eve, the Orloj will keep on ticking... You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/8fb85081ba9c3d8452717fc94c2b949a Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 14721 AP Archive
Middle-aged graffiti elders are still picking up the spray
 
05:06
(31 Jul 2012) LEADIN: Graffiti art was a radical form of expression that changed the landscape of New York's streets in the 1970s and 80s. Three decades on, many of the original graffiti artists are still spray painting their feelings and creating art on New York's streets despite their middle-aged responsibilities. STORYLINE: In torn jeans and saddled with a black backpack, Andrew Witten glances up and down the street for police, and then whips out his black marker pen and scribbles "Zephyr" on a wall. Witten was part of a generation of urban latchkey kids who spray-painted their initials all over Manhattan in the 1970s and '80s. Now the artistic rebels that transformed the city's urban landscape, and art scene are coming of age - middle age, that is. But the 51-year-old single father is having trouble putting away his spray paint can. Now revered as a graffiti elder, Witten says it is the only time he feels free. "I'm chronologically old to be out there doing it. I'm sure I can't run quite as fast. But it's the only time that I feel completely free actually," he says. Witten built a reputation as a master at spray-painting extravagant graffiti pieces on freight and subway trains, called train-bombing, in the neighbourhoods where he now teaches his 6-year-old daughter, Lulu, to skateboard. For him, spray-painting other people's property with his nickname, or tag, is almost an addiction, and danger is part of the drug. Crawling under barbed wire, ducking from police officers, even being shot at is all part of the experience. But he is all too aware of the consequences of being caught by the police for expressing himself on public property when he is a single father caring for his daughter. "I'm ready. I could go tonight. But I have to be pragmatic and look at the benefits if I go tonight and the risks. And because of my daughter that wouldn't be the responsible thing to do because she needs her father and in jail I'm not much use as a father," he says. But with an artist's heart, Witten describes painting graffiti in more poetic terms. He calls it a freeing experience, in which the silence of night gives way to the hiss and mist of the spray rising into the moonlight. On a tour of past works of graffiti, Witten says something from 1994 is a rarity: usually work would be spray painted over, or cleaned away. Witten's brush with fame now often comes with his freelance art writing and his sporadic visits to his daughter's school, where he teaches her classmates how to draw. Lulu knows her father draws "crazy art," a term she picked up from seeing graffiti on trains. "Well she's a big fan of graffiti but she has her own name for it which is 'crazy art' which she came up with on her own," he says. Angel Ortiz recently served 41 days of a 50-day sentence in the Rikers Island jail system after being busted for spraying his tag, LA Roc, on a billboard in March last year. For decades, 45-year-old Ortiz, has been known on Manhattan's Lower East Side as LA Roc. A traumatic loss of a girlfriend brought him out of a 14-year hiatus from graffiti writing. He has since been caught three times spraying his tag on property, each time while walking a friend's dog. The streets are his canvasses he says. He usually scribbles with black marker pen, "LA Roc", and was doing this when he was caught by police. When a pair of police officers smelled the fresh paint and nabbed Ortiz, they asked if he saw himself as too old to be doing graffiti. But even now, Ortiz keeps a spray can or marker in his pocket to satisfy that incessant itch to tag mailboxes, signs and fire hydrants. Graffiti documentary maker and photographer Henry Chalfant looks back at Ortiz's heyday as a revolutionary time period in street art. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/9fb502f92abaa42706c49d1f08967133 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 17563 AP Archive