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Видео добавленное пользователем “eHealth”
How does health insurance work?
 
01:33
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Long-Term Health  Insurance Vs. Short-Term Health Insurance
 
04:56
Long-Term Health Insurance Vs. Short-Term Health Insurance
Просмотров: 10946 eHealth
How does a health insurance Deductible work?
 
00:57
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How does student health insurance work?
 
05:08
How does student health insurance work? Many colleges and universities require their students to have health insurance before they can enroll in classes. So if you're a student, and you're not covered by a parent or guardian's health insurance policy, it's time to take notes. Health reform allows children to stay on their parent's health insurance plan until age 26, which can be a great option if you're going to school near home or have a pre-existing medical condition. If that's not you, this video will identify three additional types of independently purchased health insurance plans that are typically available to students. We'll compare them to see how they differ. And, we'll offer a few considerations to help you pick the right plan for your needs. The Federal government is considering changing the rules regarding student health insurance plans. If the rules change we will update the content of this video. If you're a college student, you may have more than one health insurance option to choose from. Here are the three most common options you can purchase on your own. First, many students elect to purchase their own individual health insurance plan, sometimes with help from Mom and Dad. Second, some students may choose to enroll in a health insurance plan sponsored by their school. And third -- some students may elect to purchase what's known as an individually-purchased "student" health insurance policy. Students who opt to purchase their own individual health insurance policy usually purchase the coverage for one of the following reasons: 1. In most states, if you're in relatively good health, individual health insurance coverage can be very affordable. 2. These plans also provide coverage for some Federally recommended preventive care at no out of pocket cost 3. These plans have no dollar limits on the essential medical benefits they provide you over the lifetime of the policy 4. Individual plans purchased in your area may provide good access to physicians and hospitals off of your campus. 5. Finally, students can keep these plans for as long as they wish to own the policy. Graduating from college does not force a student to cancel these types of health insurance plans. But it's important to note that: 1. Not all applicants who apply for individually purchased health insurance plans are issued a policy. 2. In most states, you could be declined coverage if you have a pre-existing medical condition. Many colleges and universities allow students to enroll in a school-sponsored plan. Students who enroll in a university-sponsored plan are usually attracted to one or more of the following benefits: 1. Most full-time students, and some part-time students, qualify. 2. Some of these plans make it convenient to receive medical care by directing students to local or on-campus health centers or hospitals. 3. Medical services provided in the network may also have very low co-pays and deductibles. But, it's important to note that: 1. Some school-sponsored plans may not cover you when you're at home during breaks or if you're away on an internship. 2. Some school-sponsored plans may exclude coverage of any pre-existing conditions you may have. 3. School-sponsored plans have historically placed lifetime limits on the amount of coverage they'll provide -- either on a per injury/illness basis or on the entire plan. Individual student health insurance policies are typically a mix of benefits from individual health insurance policies and school-sponsored plans. Students who purchase individual "student" health insurance policies typically like the following benefits: - Like individual health insurance policies, these plans typically have affordable monthly premiums, though they may be billed annually rather than monthly. - These plans also usually provide good access to a network of off-campus medical facilities and physicians. - Like school-sponsored health insurance plans, they're usually available to most students - They often have low co-pays and low deductibles. In addition to these benefits, some student plans also offer: - Tuition insurance, which reimburses you the cost of your tuition if you get an illness that causes you to miss a quarter or semester of school. - And, like school-sponsored insurance plans, some individual student plans may place lifetime dollar limits on your medical benefits. If you're trying to choose a health insurance plan that's right for you, understanding the differences in the types of coverage available should help you make an informed decision. If you have other questions or concerns about your options for health insurance as a student, don't hesitate to chat online or call a licensed eHealthInsurance agent. eHealthInsurance Customer Support is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Both while you're shopping, and if you ever have problems with your coverage after your purchase.
Просмотров: 11246 eHealth
How does Dental Insurance work?
 
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This video describes how Dental Insurance works, why you need it, and how you can best access your benefits.
Просмотров: 37928 eHealth
How do you get health insurance?
 
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How do you get health insurance? That’s a great question! If you need health insurance, you really have three options: One - You can go to a government exchange Two - You can go to a broker, like eHealth.com Three - You can buy directly from an insurance company Each of these three has some similarities, and some differences. Here is what’s the same, no matter where you buy your health insurance: FIRST is Prices – The price of a health insurance plan is fixed, by law, so you can’t get a better price based on where you buy. And, regardless of who you buy from, an insurance company, the government or a broker like eHealth can help you apply for Tax Credits – also known as “Obamacare Subsidies” - Not every one qualifies, but it’s a good idea to try. You may be surprised! The SECOND similarity is Basic Benefits - Thanks to Obamacare, all major medical health insurance plans must have the same basic set of 10 essential health benefits The THIRD is ACCESS – Pre-Existing medical conditions cannot prevent you from getting major medical insurance coverage as long as you apply during the open enrollment period – no matter where you buy. Here is what’s different about each of the three: Insurance Companies - If you buy direct from the insurance company, you’ll have the confidence of knowing you’re working directly with the coverage provider. Government Exchanges - If you buy through a government exchange, they have navigators who can answer basic questions about the Affordable Care Act. You’ll also see all of the health plans available in your area that can be bought using a government subsidy or tax credit. eHealth.com - If you buy from eHealth, in most cases you’ll have a lot more plans to choose from - eHealth shows all the plans that can be bought with a subsidy as well as plans that protect you from tax penalties, but can’t be bought with a subsidy. eHealth – and other brokers – also have licensed agents trained on the different options and can legally recommend plans based on your specific health care needs. And, with eHealth, if you ever run into a problem with your insurance company, you can call the nation’s largest online broker for help. Get quotes and compare plans now at: https://www.ehealth.com _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth
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Accident Insurance
 
02:37
In this video we'll talk about accident insurance; why you should consider having it; what it covers and how it works. Why should you consider accident insurance? According to the National Safety Council, more than 25 million people in America suffered a disabling injury every year between 2005 and 2008. If you're in an accident, there may be medical bills and expenses that you did not anticipate, like high deductibles or other out-of-pocket costs. Depending on the type of major medical insurance you have, some hospital bills, doctor's fees, rehab and physical therapy costs may not be covered by your major medical insurance policy. And, if you're unable to work, your regular bills, like your mortgage or rent, utilities and auto payments don't stop coming. Unless you have a robust savings account that can handle large unexpected expenses, accident insurance may be right for you. What can accident insurance do for you? Accident insurance helps provide you with a way to stay ahead of the medical and out-of-pocket expenses that you may face after an accidental injury. Accident insurance provides you with cash benefits that are either paid to you directly or that can be assigned to someone else -- at your discretion. And, you decide how best to spend the funds. Accident insurance is designed to help you protect the money you've saved from large, unexpected expenses due to an accidental injury. How does accident insurance work? - With accident insurance you may receive cash benefits to help with expenses that may not be fully covered by your major medical insurance; o things like Broken teeth; o Concussions; o Confinement to an Intensive care unit; o visits to the emergency room; o and more. - With accident insurance you may also receive cash benefits, which can be used at your discretion to help with things like housing, gas, electric and cable bills; or payments for vehicles - like cars, boats and motorcycles. Accident insurance is designed to help provide you with peace of mind.
Просмотров: 8466 eHealth
How Health Insurance Works
 
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When I consider purchasing an individual health insurance plan for myself or my family, do I have any financial obligations beyond the monthly premium and annual deductible? Answers: It depends on the plan, but some plans have the following cost-sharing elements that you should be aware of. Co-Payments: Some plans include a co-payment, which is typically a specific flat fee you pay for each medical service, such as $30 for an office visit. After the co-payment is made, the insurance company typically pays the remainder of the covered medical charges. Deductibles: Some plans include a deductible, which typically refers to the amount of money you must pay each year before your health insurance plan starts to pay for covered medical expenses. Coinsurance: Some plans include coinsurance. Coinsurance is a cost sharing requirement that makes you responsible for paying a certain percentage of any costs. The insurance company pays the remaining percentage of the covered medical expenses after your insurance deductible is met. Out-of-pocket limit: Some plans include an out-of-pocket limit. Typically, the out-of-pocket limit is the maximum amount you will pay out of your own pocket for covered medical expenses in a given year. The out-of-pocket limit typically includes deductibles and coinsurance. But, out-of-pocket limits don't typically apply to co-payments. Lifetime maximum: Most plans include a lifetime maximum. Typically the lifetime maximum is the amount your insurance plan will pay for covered medical expenses in the course of your lifetime. Exclusions & Limitations: Most health insurance carriers disclose exclusions & limitations of their plans. It is always a good idea to know what benefits are limited and which services are excluded on your plan. You will be obligated to pay for 100% of services that are excluded on your policy. Beginning September 23, 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (health care reform) begins to phase out annual dollar limits. Starting on September 23, 2012, annual limits on health insurance plans must be at least $2 million. By 2014 no new health insurance plan will be permitted to have an annual dollar limit on most covered benefits. Some health insurance plans purchased before March 23, 2010 have what is called "grandfathered status." Health Insurance Plans with Grandfathered status are exempt from several changes required by health care reform including this phase out of annual limits on health coverage. If you purchased your health insurance policy after March 23, 2010 and you're due for a routine preventive care screening like a mammogram or colonoscopy, you may be able to receive that preventive care screening without making a co-payment. You can talk to your insurer or your licensed eHealthInsurance agent if you need help determining whether or not you qualify for a screening without a co-payment. There are five important changes that occurred with individual and family health insurance policies on September 23, 2010. Those changes are: 1. Added protection from rate increases: Insurance companies will need to publically disclose any rate increases and provide justification before raising your monthly premiums. 2. Added protection from having insurance canceled: An insurance company cannot cancel your policy except in cases of intentional misrepresentations or fraud. 3. Coverage for preventive care: Certain recommended preventive services, immunizations, and screenings will be covered with no cost sharing requirement. 4. No lifetime maximums on health coverage: No lifetime limits on the dollar value of those health benefits deemed to be essential by the Department of Health and Human Services. 5. No pre-existing condition exclusions for children: If you have children under the age of 19 with pre-existing medical conditions, their application for health insurance cannot be declined due to a pre-existing medical condition. In some states a child may need to wait for the state's open-enrollment period before their application will be approved.
Просмотров: 583100 eHealth
How Much Does Small Business Health Insurance Cost?
 
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To learn more about how you can apply for Small Business Health Insurance, visit: https://www.ehealthinsurance.com/small-business-health-insurance?allid=sma6506000 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth
Просмотров: 1880 eHealth
What does Medicare Part B cover?
 
02:27
A common question we get from customers is: "What is Medicare Part B, and what does it cover?" So, what is Medicare Part B? Along with Medicare Part A, Medicare Part B is sometimes referred to as part of Original Medicare that most people get when they turn 65. You typically have to actively enroll in Part B when you turn 65, which you can do by contacting the Social Security Administration online, in person or over the phone. Unlike Medicare Part A, Part B has a monthly premium that most people have to pay, unless you meet certain income requirements. And, once you’re enrolled, your Part B premiums are automatically deducted from your Social Security Check – If you delay your social security, you’ll be sent a bill each month for your Part B premium. So, What does Medicare Part B cover? Think of your Medicare Part B coverage as your insurance for out-patient medical care – like, office visits to the doctor when you’re sick. Specifically, Medicare Part B covers services that are medically necessary to diagnose or treat a medical condition, like a cold or sore back. Medicare Part B also covers care aimed at preventing or detecting illnesses at an early stage. This preventive care is aimed at detecting any health problems early on so that they’re treated before you get really sick, or prevented all together. Medicare Parts A and B often work hand-in-hand, but Medicare Part B covers things like: • Clinical research • Ambulance services • Durable medical equipment • Inpatient and outpatient mental health care • Getting a second opinion before surgery • And limited outpatient prescription drugs Medicare has neither reviewed nor endorsed this information. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
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What is Medicare Advantage?
 
02:30
What is Medicare Advantage? In 2016 over 17 million Americans were enrolled In a Medicare Advantage plan. So, you’re probably asking, what is Medicare Advantage? In a nutshell? There are three distinct types of private health insurance products offered through Medicare-approved insurance companies. They’re designed to either go along with Original Medicare, or replace it. Medicare Advantage is one of those. Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plans combine your Part A Hospital, Part B Medical, and Part D Prescription Drug coverage into a single health insurance plan. Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug Plans must offer the same benefits as Original Medicare, Part A & B, as well as the minimum Part D benefit. But, they also have to limit your out-of-pocket costs. And many include extra benefits, like and coverage for routine dental and vision care. So, why might someone choose Medicare Advantage over “Original Medicare?” These are three common reasons we hear - First, for many people it’s just nice to have hospital, medical and prescription drug coverage – all in one plan. - Second, in most places, there are Medicare Advantage prescription drug plans available at no additional cost – some plans require an additional monthly premium, but not all - And third, because they’re required to limit your yearly out-of-pocket costs. - Original Medicare doesn’t have the same limit. Sometimes people ask, what if I don’t like my Medicare Advantage prescription drug plan? • You can switch to another, or go back to Original Medicare during the annual enrollment period - October 15 to December 7. If you still have questions about Medicare Advantage, do a little research to see if Medicare Advantage might be right for you. Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
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Medicare Tips: How does Medicare work?
 
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This video has basic, generalized information about Medicare. We don’t cover all the details and specifics of the program. Medicare is a government-sponsored health insurance program that covers most visits to the hospital and visits to the doctor. Most people become eligible for Medicare when they turn 65 – although there are exceptions. Basic Medicare coverage is typically referred to as "Original Medicare." And, it breaks down into two parts: 1. Medicare Part A - which helps you pay for visits to the hospital. 2. And Medicare Part B - which helps you pay for visits to the doctor when you’re not in the hospital. Monthly Medicare costs break down like this: 1. PART A is free every month for most people 2. PART B costs about $100 a month for most people Medicare deductibles break down like this: - PART A has a deductible of about $1,200 – and it can be applied each time you’re admitted to the hospital, unless you’re readmitted for the same illness within a given timeframe – usually 30 days. - Part B has a $147 deductible that resets once a year. Here is how Medicare cost-sharing breaks down: - PART A has co-insurance – a form of cost-sharing - when you’re hospitalized for an extended period of time – usually longer than 60 days. - PART B has co-insurance – a form of cost-sharing – of 20% for most service, which means you’ll pay 20% of approved costs. Another Medicare cost to be aware of relates to Medicare’s approved rate: - In most instances Medicare has an “approved rate,” which is essentially the rate Medicare is willing to pay for any given service, like a doctor visit or an MRI. - Some health care providers – doctors and hospitals - may wish to charge more than the Medicare approved rate for services. - And, if you visit one of those providers, you may be asked to make up the differences in costs. Medicare has neither reviewed nor endorsed this information. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Get your Medicare questions answered by licensed professionals: http://medicare.com _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Get quotes and compare plans now at: http://www.ehealthmedicare.com
Просмотров: 6428 eHealth
What is a PPO health insurance plan?
 
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How do Obamacare subsidies work?
 
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A common question we hear in our customer care center is: Can you explain how the subsidies work? 1. People who live in the U.S. 2. Are U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, or lawfully present in the U.S. 3. Are not currently incarcerated may qualify for premium tax credits to help them pay for their health insurance. If you meet these requirements, and you're total household income is between 100 and 400% of the Federal Poverty Level (or FPL), you will likely be eligible to receive a premium tax credit to reduce the cost of your health insurance. These 'premium credits" or subsidies will be set on a sliding scale so that your contributions to the monthly premiums will be limited to a defined percentage of your income. It's complicated... If you meet residency requirements for subsidies, then you're total household income has to be between 100% and 400% of the Federal Poverty Level (or FPL). If it is, you may qualify for a "premium tax credit," or subsidy, to limit what you pay for your health insurance. These subsidies are set on a sliding scale so that what you spend each month is limited to a defined percentage of your income, to the second least expensive silver-level plan available in your area. Confused? Here is an example If you wanted to buy the second least expensive silver plan available in your area, and your monthly income is 133% of FPL, you would be earning about $1,273 per month in 2013. At that income level you could spend no more than 3% of your income -- about $38 per month -- to buy that second least expensive plan. The government subsidy pays the rest of your monthly premium. As your income increases, so does your share of the cost for the monthly premium. So, if your income rises to 400% of FPL -- about $3,832 per month in 2013 - you could spend no more than 9.5% of your monthly income -- about $364 - for that same plan; the second least expensive silver plan. So if the second least expensive silver plan available in your area costs $300 a month, and you earn 400% of FPL, there is no subsidy for you. But, if the second least expensive silver plan available in your area costs $500 a month, the government would pay the difference between the $500 plan and your $364 cap. In that scenario you would pay $364 per month for your health insurance plan, and the value of your subsidy would be $136; $500 minus your $364 cap. Now, if there also happened to be a bronze plan available for $400 a month, you could enroll in that plan and get the same $136 subsidy. In that case, your plan would cost you $264 per month. Or, if you wanted a Gold plan that cost $600 per month, you would -- once again -- apply your $136 per month subsidy and pay $464 per month for your insurance policy.
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Medicare Tips: Medicare Advantage plans with $0 monthly premium?
 
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Understand how a Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plans can be zero dollars ($0) or have no premium. - All Medicare Advantage plans offer, at a minimum, the same coverage as Original Medicare, Part A and Part B. - These plans offered by private insurance companies can set their own prices and must be approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services before anyone can enroll. - With a $0 plan, you’re getting Medicare Advantage for the same amount you would pay for Medicare Part B - And, the government pays the insurer an additional amount. - What you get with a Medicare Advantage plan, that you don’t get with Original Medicare is a cap or limit on your out-of-pocket costs of $6,700 or less. - In addition, many Medicare Advantage plans include a Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit – these are typically called Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plans (MA-PD)s. And, these plans may also be available for a $0 monthly premium" Medicare has neither reviewed nor endorsed this information. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Get your Medicare questions answered by licensed professionals: http://medicare.com _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Get quotes and compare plans now at: http://www.ehealthmedicare.com
Просмотров: 642 eHealth
How does out-of-network coverage work?
 
02:11
Out of Network Coverage What happens if I go to a doctor or hospital that doesn’t take the plan I chose? Hello again! This time we want to tackle one of the pitfalls that customers fear when choosing a plan. “What happens if you go to a doctor or hospital that doesn’t accept your health insurance plan?” So, there are three things you should be aware of off the top: First, you’re not totally out-of-luck if this happens. Second, if you’re not 100 percent certain that your doctor or hospital is in-network, it’s a good idea to look for a health plan that provides out-of-network coverage. Third, if you go out of network you may have to file your own claim with the insurance company, and you may have to pay more than you would in-network. So, I’m going to walk you through how to use eHealth.com to see if a plan has both in and out of network coverage. Then we’ll touch on what it takes to file your own claims and the timelines related to that. **Screen capture of ehealth.com plan compare page (SAN FRANCISCO, CA /Male /01/01/1980 /Non-smoker)** To start, lets find a plan that does feature out of network coverage. To do this we’ll go ahead and use the ehealth.com sorting tools, and sort by “plan type,” and “PPO.” **Screen capture – scroll down the left column and click on “plan type,” then click on PPO and wait to sort/load** Once you find a plan, you’ll need to click the plan name to verify it has out of network coverage. This will launch the plan details page. On this page you’ll find tons of great information about and that includes the plan type and whether or not a plan covers you if you go out-of-network. So, you can see this plan here does, in fact, have out of network coverage. So what does that mean? If your plan includes out of network coverage, you’ll be able to see providers both in and out of the plan’s network. So, if you wind up in a hospital or doctor’s office that says they don’t take your insurance, your insurance company is still going to help you pay for a portion of the bill for any covered medical expenses. But if you do see a provider that is out of network you’ll most likely have higher cost sharing responsibilities and you’ll have to file your own claims. You make your claims directly with your insurance company, so here at eHealth we will generally not see your claims or the personal health information in your claims. But, that doesn't mean we can't help you with out-of-network claims. You can contact us at eHealth and we can: • Help you figure out what bills and other documentation you'll need to file an out-of-network claim. • Help you determine how long you have to file that claim – its often up to one year, but I have seen limitations as short as 90 days, so don't procrastinate. • Help you determine the best way to file an out-of-network claim with your insurer – with some insurance companies, believe it or not, the best way to file a claim is still with a fax machine. If you have more questions about a health insurance plan, as always, we recommend that you speak with a licensed agent.
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Can I qualify for Obamacare after the deadline?
 
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Do you qualify for Obamacare? Under the Affordable Care Act—Obamacare--if you want to enroll in a health plan outside of the annual Open Enrollment Period, you must have what's called a qualifying event -- which is sometimes also referred to as a qualifying life event. An example of a qualifying event would be: 1. Permanently moving to a new city or state 2. Certain changes in your income 3. Changes in your family due to marriage, divorce, birth of a child, or loss of a loved-one 4. Loss of existing health coverage because of a job change or job loss 5. Loss of eligibility for Medicaid or CHIP, 6. Or, expiration of your COBRA benefits If you have a qualifying event, in most cases that triggers a 60-day Special Enrollment Period when you can change your existing coverage or apply for a new plan. If you have a qualifying event that triggers a special enrollment period, eHealth recommends that you have documentation of your qualifying life event with you when you apply for new coverage -- whether you apply online or offline. In some instances, documentation forms may not be necessary, but it's better to have them in case your new insurance company needs them. You should also be aware that you're not likely to qualify for a Special Enrollment Period if you voluntarily cancel your coverage or lose it because you didn't pay your bills. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Get quotes and compare plans now at: https://www.ehealth.com
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Medicare Overview
 
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This video helps you understand your Medicare choices. Get quotes and compare plans now at: http://www.ehealthmedicare.com _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Get your Medicare questions answered by licensed professionals: http://medicare.com _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Medicare has neither reviewed nor endorsed this information.
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How Do Small Business Health Reimbursement Arrangements Work?
 
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To learn more about how you can apply for Small Business Health Insurance, visit: https://www.ehealthinsurance.com/small-business-health-insurance?allid=sma6506000 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth How do small business health reimbursement arrangements, or HRAs, work? A federal law passed at the end of 2016 known as the “21st Century Cures Act” provides small businesses with a potential new way to help their employees pay for health insurance. Under this law, qualifying small businesses can use health reimbursement accounts, or HRAs, to help their employees buy health insurance and pay for health care related expenses. Here is how it works. A qualifying small employer opens an HRA account on behalf of an employee. Then, in 2017, the employer can put up to $4,950 into the account for a single employee, or $10,000 for an employee with a family. The employee can then buy their own individual or family health insurance plan. And, they can use the money in their HRA to pay their monthly premiums or certain out of pocket costs Be aware that employees who receive HRA contributions typically won’t be eligible for government subsidies when buying coverage on their own through a government exchange. However, employees can shop for individual or family coverage on non-government exchanges like eHealth.com or when buying directly from an insurance company. Although federal law allows HRAs to be used in this way, HRAs may not be an option in all states because some state laws restricting HRAs have not yet been updated. For more information about Health Reimbursement Arrangements for small businesses, speak with an accountant or a tax or legal advisor. To learn more about your small business health insurance options today, visit eHealth.com or speak to one of our licensed insurance agents.
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What is Coinsurance?
 
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Просмотров: 648 eHealth
What Does Medicare Part A Cover?
 
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A question we hear often from folks who call in is, What does Medicare Part A cover? Great question. Part A (hospital insurance) generally covers you when you’re admitted to a hospital, skilled nursing or nursing home facility or when you receive hospice care or covered home health services. Part A Benefits include: Inpatient Hospital Care - This has a deductible that can reset Skilled Nursing Care – For the first 20 days there is no cost-sharing. From days 21 through 100 you pay a co-insurance amount for each day, and that amount can change every year. Part A also covers care in a Long Term Care Hospital – In some instances, you may be charged a deductible if you’re admitted to a long-term care hospital. Part A also covers certain Home Health Care Services – If you’re unable to leave your home and require Home Health Services from a nurse, you’re typically not charged any additional cost-sharing. And, Part A also covers Hospice care – Most hospice services are covered without any additional cost sharing. Medicare has neither reviewed nor endorsed this information. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
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What's an HMO Health Insurance plan?
 
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What is a "qualifying event" for Obamacare?
 
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At eHealth we're often asked, "Do I qualify for Obamacare?" Under the Affordable Care Act—Obamacare--if you want to enroll in a health plan outside of the annual Open Enrollment Period, you must have what's called a qualifying event -- which is sometimes also referred to as a qualifying life event An example of a qualifying event would be: 1. Permanently moving to a new city or state 2. Certain changes in your income 3. Changes in your family due to marriage, divorce, birth of a child, or loss of a loved-one 4. Loss of existing health coverage because of a job change or job loss 5. Loss of eligibility for Medicaid or CHIP, 6. Or, expiration of your COBRA benefits If you have a qualifying event, in most cases that triggers a 60-day Special Enrollment Period when you can change your existing coverage or apply for a new plan. If you have a qualifying event that triggers a special enrollment period, eHealth recommends that you have documentation of your qualifying life event with you when you apply for new coverage -- whether you apply online or offline. In some instances, documentation forms may not be necessary, but it's better to have them in case your new insurance company needs them. You should also be aware that you're not likely to qualify for a Special Enrollment Period if you voluntarily cancel your coverage or lose it because you didn't pay your bills. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Get quotes and compare plans now at: https://www.ehealth.com
Просмотров: 1414 eHealth
How does Obamacare health insurance work?
 
01:47
How does health insurance work? Here is an example of how insurance cost-sharing works: Let’s assume you have health plan with a $1,000 deductible, 20% coinsurance, and a $6,000 out-of-pocket maximum.   Deductible: If you incur a $50,000 medical bill, you will first need to pay your $1,000 deductible. That would leave you with $5,000 in cost-sharing left before you reach your plan’s $6,000 out-of-pocket maximum. Coinsurance: With 20% coinsurance, you would pay $1,000 for every $4,000 paid by your insurance company. That means, for the next $25,000 in covered medical expenses you would pay $5,000 and your insurer would pay $20,000. Out-of-pocket maximum: Once you’ve paid your $1,000 deductible and $5,000 in coinsurance, you’ve reached your $6,000 out of pocket maximum. Altogether, with this $50,000 medical bill, you will have paid $6,000 and your insurer will have paid the remaining $44,000.
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How Does Medicare Work?
 
03:35
A question we hear all the time is, how does Medicare work? It can be confusing, but here are the basics. Medicare is the federal health insurance program for people who are 65 or older. It’s also available to younger people with certain disabilities, people with End-Stage Renal Disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease. Medicare, has: Medicare Part A - hospital insurance, Medicare Part B - medical insurance, and Medicare Part D, prescription drug coverage. Medicare Part A and B are generally referred to as “Original Medicare.” So… to understand how Medicare works, let’s talk about Original Medicare. Original Medicare is different from other forms of major health insurance – like the health insurance Americans get from their employer. It’s different in four key ways: The first thing that is different about Original Medicare is that it covers hospital care and medical care separately. Part A is the hospital insurance. It generally covers you when you’re admitted to a hospital, skilled nursing or nursing home facility, or when you receive hospice care or covered home health services. Part B is the medical insurance. It generally covers medically necessary care that either diagnoses or treats a medical problem, like the flu, in an outpatient setting - like a doctor’s office. Part B also provides care aimed at preventing or detecting illnesses at an early stage. The second thing that makes Original Medicare different is that it doesn’t limit your Out-of-Pocket medical expenses. When we talk about out-of-pocket medical expenses that means charges you have to pay yourself. Those charges include things like copayments, deductibles, and coinsurance. One example is, when you’re admitted to the hospital, Part A has a deductible. After you’re released from the hospital that deductible can reset . An example of Part B out-of-pocket costs is that you’ll have to pay 20% of approved medical costs, after you pay your deductible. The third way that Original Medicare is different from other types of health insurance is that it doesn’t cover prescription drugs, in most cases. Prescription drug coverage is available through a separate program called Medicare Part D. Finally, the fourth way Original Medicare is different is that it doesn’t have standard “Provider Networks.” What that means is that the amount you pay to see a doctor can vary, depending on whether or not your doctor participates in Medicare. At eHealth, we hope that, once you understand how Medicare works, and how its different from insurance you have made in the past, you’ll be better prepared when its time to enroll. Medicare has neither reviewed nor endorsed this information. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
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Short Term Health Insurance
 
02:05
1.Short-term health plans don’t protect you from tax penalties Short-term health plans are designed to provide you with an affordable way to receive limited health coverage for short period of time when you’re not insured. But, they don’t meet all of the benefit standards of the Affordable Care Act, which means you could be subject to a tax penalty for being uninsured, even if you’re enrolled in a short-term health insurance plan. 2. Major medical health insurance may cost less than you think Major medical individual and family health insurance plans can be more expensive than short-term plans because they offer more benefits. But, if you earn less than 400% of the federal poverty level (about $47,500 for a single person in 2016), you MAY qualify for a subsidy to lower your costs. 3. Open enrollment only comes around once a year, so get out there and shop Open enrollment for ACA-compliant plans only comes around once each year. The 2017 open enrollment period for individual and family coverage starts on November 1, 2016 and is scheduled to end on January 31, 2017. If you don’t buy coverage during this period, you may be out of luck for the rest of 2017! 4. Short-term insurance isn’t guaranteed You do have to apply for a short-term health plan each time you renew coverage, and insurers can decline your application, even if you’ve been approved for short-term coverage in the past. 5.Short-term insurance requires you to file your own claims With a major medical health plan, your insurance company handles all of your billing and even negotiates prices for you with the health care provider. 6.The end of your short-term plan does not make you eligible for a major medical or “Obamacare” health plan When your short-term health plan ends, you won’t automatically be able to buy a major medical health insurance plan. Without a qualifying life event, you’ll have to wait until the next open enrollment to be guaranteed access to health coverage. View the image below for detailed comparison between Major Medical Plans and Short Term Plans.
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Tips for Open Enrollment
 
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eHealthInsurance Offers Five Last-Minute Tips For Open Enrollment Families May be Able to Save Money by Putting Dependents on Individual Plans eHealthInsurance, the leading online source of health insurance for individuals, families and small businesses, released five tips for consumers looking to manage their health insurance budgets during open-enrollment, the traditional time of year when individuals with employer-sponsored coverage have the option to make additions, changes or deletions to their health care benefits. For most U.S. companies, open-enrollment often runs from the first of October through the end of December. In todays economic climate, employees may be looking to trim costs any way possible. To help make the right decision, eHealthInsurance recommends the following Top 5 Tips for Open-Enrollment. 1.Review Every Plan: Start reviewing every plan available from your employer now. You may be able to choose a plan that would cost less if you were later required to pay the entire premium through COBRA. Always make sure that the plan you choose will cover the health care benefits you need for the coming year. 2.Evaluate Premiums: Look at the premium for your current employer-sponsored plan and see if that premium is increasing. If saving on your monthly share of the premium is a priority, you may want to revisit this plan and opt for one of the less expensive plans available from your companys benefits provider. 3.Shop Smarter: Buy only what you need and potentially save on the monthly premium. Choosing a high deductible plan is smart for some individuals and families because it typically reduces monthly premiums, but you must be prepared to pay the amount of the deductible in the coming year as health care needs arise. 4.Compare with your Spouse: Check your spouses plan to see if the employee share of the premium is more or less than your plan. It may be more cost-effective to insure you or your family under their plan. 5.Mix and Match: Depending on health conditions, it can be less expensive for certain family members to be on a separate plan than the employer-sponsored plan. Do the math on separate policies if there are special needs. It's easy to price individual and family plans online. Visit http://www.ehealthinsurance.com/ for free online health insurance quotes.
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No Cost Enrollment Strategy for State Health Insurance Exchanges
 
03:05
This Fall, state Health Insurance Exchanges will begin enrolling low-income families in health insurance plans, and allowing them to pay for their insurance with premium tax credits, or subsidies. Exchanges are essential to fulfilling the promise of health care reform, but they're untested, and in many cases behind schedule and over budget. Leaders in both parties believe we should not leave the enrollment effort solely in the hands of unproven exchanges. Many have urged the Department of Health and Human Services to seek help from companies in the private sector. Health and Human Services embraced this approach with regulations that allow states to partner with licensed online health insurance marketplaces from the private sector. This approach creates strong public / private partnerships that combine the best of government and business. But, how would these marketplaces work with a state's exchange? Here is an example of how this process could work: - If we assume many people will do what they're already doing today, every day. - A person who goes to Google or Bing, might search for "health insurance" - The first "free" result they're likely to see is the online health insurance marketplace, eHealthInsurance.com - After clicking on that result, the individual would find themselves on an online marketplace and do what comes naturally, click "find plans" - The consumer then provides some basic anonymous demographic information -- age, gender, zip code, family size and the date they want their coverage to start - An marketplace approved to enroll consumers in qualified health plans using premium tax credits would also need to make the consumer aware that they may be eligible for a subsidy or premium tax credit. - To determine their potential eligibility, the visitor could simply select their income range. - With that small bit of information, an online marketplace could let those who -- based on estimated income and family size - are likely to be eligible for a subsidy to apply for assistance... - A licensed online marketplace could then quickly let the customer know that they may be eligible for a subsidy, and explain the process they'd need to undertake to apply for a subsidy - From here, a consumer could be sent to an exchanges subsidy application page -- all the while having access to a licensed agent or other support resources from the third party online marketplace - Once the subsidy application is complete -- an individual could shop directly on the exchange through an iFrame... - or, depending on the private marketplace's integration with an exchange, customers could shop for insurance using their subsidies right on the online marketplace. - In either case, federal regulations make it clear that customers must be presented with every plan available on the exchange -- again, the exact same plans at the exact same prices as they're displayed on the state's exchange - with the subsidy applied to the cost of the plan.
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Medicare Tips: Do you know the 3 gaps in Medicare?
 
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"What are the three gaps in Medicare coverage, and how can you fill them? Original Medicare – Parts A & B - is a fantastic program, but it has three gaps that every person should be aware of: 1. Unlimited out-of-pocket costs – Original Medicare does not have a cap or limit on your cost-sharing for Medicare approved services. 2. Prescription Drug Coverage – Original Medicare does not cover the cost of most prescription drugs. A separate program – Medicare Part D covers drugs. You need to enroll in Part D separately to get that coverage. 3. Doctors – Medicare does not have a clearly defined network of health care providers or a list of doctors who are required to accept Medicare patients. So, when you’re enrolling in Medicare be aware of these gaps and the private insurance programs available to fill them. To fill all three gaps, a person can either: Enroll in a: 1. Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plan – these plans are legally required to have a cap on your out-of-pocket medical costs; they must provide Part D prescription drug coverage; and they must have a clearly defined network of doctors who accept the plan. Your other option is to enroll in a Medicare Supplement plan and a separate prescription drug plan. 2. Medicare Supplements are designed to cover your out-of-pocket medical costs. 3. Medicare Part D Prescription Drug plans –provide prescription drug coverage through Medicare Part D." Medicare has neither reviewed nor endorsed this information. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Get your Medicare questions answered by licensed professionals: http://medicare.com _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Get quotes and compare plans now at: http://www.ehealthmedicare.com
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Are Small Business Required to Provide Health Insurance to Their Employees?
 
01:40
To learn more about how you can apply for Small Business Health Insurance, visit: https://www.ehealthinsurance.com/small-business-health-insurance?allid=sma6506000 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth Are small businesses required to provide health insurance to their employees? Under current law, small businesses with less than the equivalent of fifty full-time workers are not required to offer health insurance, but many do anyway. Small business health insurance is a great choice for any employer that wants to hire and retain the best workers, but small businesses offering coverage tend to fall into three categories: Growing, successful businesses moving up in the world. Businesses with highly skilled workers, and business that are tax savvy. Let’s look at each in more detail. First, there are the growing, successful small businesses that have worked hard and proven themselves. If that’s you, congratulations! You may be ready to reward yourself and your employees with small business health coverage. Second, there are small businesses with skilled workers, even if it’s just a business with one or two employees. If that’s you, you know that when competing with larger companies for skilled workers, offering health coverage may be a necessity. Third, there are small businesses who are financially savvy and who understand the potential savings and tax benefits of offering a group health insurance plan. For example, did you know that small business group coverage may be less expensive than buying coverage on your own? And that you can typically deduct your small business premiums from your taxable income? To learn more about your small business health insurance options today, visit eHealth.com.
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I buy my own health insurance - How does health reform help me?
 
02:16
By 2014, health reform will provide you with subsidies to help you pay for the cost of your own health insurance, if you qualify as low-income. Beginning this year, if you're buying your own health insurance, all new and existing health insurance policies will benefit from new and improved consumer protections.
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Brief Medicare Summary
 
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A very brief, simple overview of your Medicare coverage choices. Get quotes and compare plans now at: http://www.ehealthmedicare.com _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Get your Medicare questions answered by licensed professionals: http://medicare.com _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Medicare has neither reviewed nor endorsed this information.
Просмотров: 1014 eHealth
Does Medicare Cover Dental?
 
01:41
A common question we hear in our Customer Care Center is, "Does Medicare cover dental? Simple answer: Original Medicare (Parts A and B) does not cover routine oral health/dental care, such as teeth cleaning, fillings, dentures, root canals, etc. When does Medicare cover dental treatment? Original Medicare may pay for dental services that are medically necessary prior to another Medicare-covered medical procedure – before you can get another more serious procedure, like a surgery. For example, Medicare might pay for a tooth extraction if it is required before heart surgery. Or, a person with oral cancer might get a procedure covered prior to radiation treatment. Even if Medicare does pay for some services as preparation for a medical procedure, it will not cover the cost of implants or dentures. Now the good news. Dental, vision or support for hearing loss is available in most areas of the country through Medicare Advantage plans. If the plan doesn’t provide routine dental and vision, or if you’re buying a Medigap plan, you can also research “stand-alone” dental and vision insurance plans. Medicare has neither reviewed nor endorsed this information. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
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What's the Best Health Insurance Plan for Your Small Business?
 
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To learn more about how you can apply for Small Business Health Insurance, visit: https://www.ehealthinsurance.com/small-business-health-insurance?allid=sma6506000 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth What’s the best health insurance plan for your small business? Most small business owners will say that the best plan is the most affordable one, but there are three main factors that can influence what you’ll pay when picking a new plan. The amount you pay toward employee premiums. The age and health needs of your group, which may affect out of pocket costs. And the type of plan you prefer. Let’s look at each of these in more detail. First, your premium share is the amount the business must pay toward employees’ premiums. Typically, the business must pay at least fifty percent of your employees’ monthly premiums under a small business health plan, though the percentage can vary by state or plan. You’re not generally required to contribute toward the monthly premiums of your employees’ dependents, but some employers do. A second factor that may influence your choice in a plan is the health of your group. How old are your employees? Do they see the doctor frequently? No qualifying employee will be refused insurance or charged more based on his or her medical condition or history, but these factors may still be important when choosing a plan. Understanding how health insurance impacts your employees and their families is important and your employees’ needs should be discussed when shopping for a plan. If your employees see the doctor frequently or use prescription drugs on a regular basis that may affect your choice of a plan. Choosing plans with higher deductibles and copayments may mean a lower monthly premium, but you’ll want to make sure you and your employees can afford that deductible in case you need medical care. Finally, the type of plan you choose can play a factor in your costs. HMO-style plans tend to have smaller networks of doctors and hospitals and so they may cost a bit less than some PPO-style plans that allow you more freedom to choose your doctors. You may also want to consider partially self-funded health plans. With a partially self-funded plan, you set aside a certain amount of money to pay for employee medical costs, but that money may be refunded to you at the end of the year if it’s not used. Work with a licensed health insurance agent to learn more about your coverage options and to get quotes that are tailored to your group’s coverage needs and budget.
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Buying Health Insurance Coverage - Why Buy from eHealthInsurance?
 
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Why buy health insurance coverage from eHealthInsurance? The Best Prices: You pay the same price at eHealthInsurance that you'll pay buying direct from the insurance company. Unbiased (Licensed) Advice: eHealthInsurance's customer care center is staffed with licensed health insurance agents in every state. Develop a lasting, long-term relationship with an agent who can help you manage your policy and provide service whenever you need support. The Largest Selection Online: The best decisions are made when you know all of your options. eHealthInsurance has the largest selection of health insurance products available online. Safe to Use: At eHealthInsurance we never share your private contact information with anyone, except for the people responsible for the processing of your health insurance application. Over 2 million Americans Insured: You can't argue with success. Over 2 million Americans have gotten quality, affordable health insurance from http://www.eHealthInsurance.com
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How Does the Obamacare Law Affect Small Business Health Insurance?
 
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To learn more about how you can apply for Small Business Health Insurance, visit: https://www.ehealthinsurance.com/small-business-health-insurance?allid=sma6506000 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth How does the Obamacare law affect small business health insurance? Officially known as the Affordable Care Act, or the ACA, the Obamacare law affects small business owners in several ways. It has, in many cases, driven down the costs of employer coverage by changing the way premiums are calculated. It can affect your taxes. It may require larger employers to offer coverage to workers. Let’s look at each of these in more detail. First, under Obamacare your health insurance premiums are no longer based on the health or pre-existing medical conditions of the people in your group. In the old days, sick coworkers could result in increased premiums for everyone else, but small business health plans are generally no longer underwritten in the same way. Now, your costs are mostly based on the ages of your employees and the general health risks of people in your local community or region. This often results in lower premiums relative to self-purchased coverage. Second, you could generally deduct monthly insurance premiums from your business’s taxes before Obamacare, but the Obamacare law also made special tax credits available to some businesses. If you have fewer than 25 employees, ask your licensed agent about these credits when shopping for coverage. Third, you should know that under Obamacare only businesses with fifty or more full-time workers (or the equivalent in part-time employees) are obliged to offer coverage or face a penalty. That said, many small business owners still opt to sponsor an employer-based plan for themselves and their employees. To learn more about your small business health insurance options today, visit eHealth.com
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How Does Medicare Part C Work?
 
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A question we hear often from customers is, what does Medicare Part C cover? Medicare Part C is typically referred to as Medicare Advantage. These plans are offered by private insurance companies that contract with Medicare as an alternative way to get your Original Medicare (Part A and Part B). Many Medicare Advantage plans also include Medicare Part D. In addition to your Part B premium, some plans – but not all - require an additional monthly premium for the Medicare Advantage plan's medical and prescription drug coverage. Please keep in mind that not all plan types are available in every area. The benefits on these plans can change from year to year, so you have the option to change your Medicare coverage every year during Medicare’s Annual Election Period – or AEP. Medicare’s Annual Election Period runs from October 15 to December 7 each year. Medicare has neither reviewed nor endorsed this information. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
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When Can I Apply for Small Business Health Insurance?
 
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To learn more about how you can apply for Small Business Health Insurance, visit: https://www.ehealthinsurance.com/small-business-health-insurance?allid=sma6506000 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth
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How much does health insurance cost? eHealth Price Index Report
 
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For more information on national prices, check out: http://ehealth.com/priceindex eHealth Price Index: Unsubsidized Health Insurance Shoppers Selecting Plans with 16% Higher Premiums During First Weeks of Open Enrollment December 10, 2014 – Today eHealth, Inc., the nation’s first and largest private online health insurance exchange, released data from the eHealth Price Index and a customer survey providing a snapshot of individual and family health insurance shopping trends from the first three weeks of the Affordable Care Act’s current nationwide open enrollment period. According to data published today, $315 was the average monthly premium for individual health insurance plans selected by eHealth shoppers not utilizing government subsidies between November 15 and December 5, 2014. This represents an increase of 16% compared to the average premium of $271 per month for 2014 plans selected over the course of the prior open enrollment period, which ran from October 2013 through March 20141. As previously reported by eHealth, early shoppers during the prior open enrollment period tended to select plans with higher monthly premiums than shoppers who selected plans closer to the end of open enrollment. The average monthly premium for individual coverage reported by eHealth today represents an increase of 2% when compared to the average premium for 2014 individual health insurance plans selected by eHealth customers during the first half of the prior open enrollment period only ($309 for the period from October – December 2013)2. In the first three weeks of the current open enrollment period (November 15 to December 5, 2014), eHealth also found: - Deductibles decreasing: The average deductible for individual plans selected by eHealth shoppers declined by 9% when compared to the average deductible for individual plans selected during the prior open enrollment period. - Premiums increasing: Increases in average premiums and decreases in average deductibles were also noted among family plans selected by eHealth shoppers when compared to the prior open enrollment period (see details below). - Average age of shoppers increasing: The average age of shoppers selecting plans increased to 40 compared to an average age of 38 over the prior open enrollment period, which may suggest that younger shoppers are delaying enrollment until later, a trend observed during the prior open enrollment period. - Reshopping trends: Nearly half (48%) of shoppers in the first three weeks of the current open enrollment period were currently insured and reshopping for 2015 coverage, according to a voluntary survey of eHealth customers. About eHealth eHealth, Inc. (NASDAQ: EHTH) operates eHealthInsurance.com, the Nation’s first and largest private health insurance exchange where individuals, families and small businesses can compare health insurance products from leading insurers side by side and purchase and enroll in coverage online. eHealthInsurance offers thousands of individual, family and small business health plans underwritten by more than 200 of the nation's leading health insurance companies. eHealthInsurance is licensed to sell health insurance in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. eHealth, Inc. also provides powerful online and pharmacy-based tools to help Medicare beneficiaries navigate Medicare health insurance options, choose the right plan and enroll in select plans online through PlanPrescriber.com (www.planprescriber.com) and eHealthMedicare.com (www.eHealthMedicare.com). For more health insurance news and information, visit the eHealth consumer blog: Get Smart – Get Covered or visit eHealth’s Affordable Care Act Resource Center at www.eHealth.com/affordable-care-act.
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Service After the Sale
 
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eHealth member Kat Taylor gets help from Amir Mostafaie after the sale. A scary medical situation had Kat wondering if she had the right health insurance coverage. She worked with Amir Mostafaie to be sure she had the health insurance coverage that would cover her.
Просмотров: 661 eHealth
Uninsured - How does health reform help me?
 
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Starting in 2014, health reform will provide subsidies to help lower-income Americans pay for health insurance. After 2014, you can apply for a private health insurance plan without having their application denied because of a pre-existing medical condition. Beginning in 2010, all new and existing health insurance policies bought by individuals and families will have new consumer protections built-in, which will strengthen the health insurance you buy on your own.
Просмотров: 615 eHealth
Health Care Reform - Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plans (PCIPs)
 
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Starting in 2014, health care reform will allow consumers - regardless of their level of health - to buy private health insurance. Starting in September, 2010 - the Federal government is providing $5 billion to help people with pre-existing conditions get access to health insurance through something called a high-risk pool. You can learn more about existing high-risk pools in your state, by visiting http://www.ehealthinsurance.com/health-plans/high-risk-pools/ or by contacting a licensed eHealthInsurance agent
Просмотров: 938 eHealth
Medicare Tips: Be aware of your “trial right” to use Medicare Advantage
 
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Medicare Supplement plans, also called Medigap, typically provide very comprehensive benefits, with limited or no out-of-pocket costs. But, they tend to cost more each month than Medicare Advantage plans. If the monthly cost of your Medigap plan is starting to become difficult to afford, you should know that Medicare offers people a “trial right” where you can try Medicare Advantage for one year. If you don’t like Medicare Advantage for any reason, you can switch back to the same Medigap plan, and potentially avoid having to go through underwriting, provided you do so within one year. If you want to give Medicare Advantage a try, the Annual Election Period – or annual enrollment period - is the time to do so. Medicare has neither reviewed nor endorsed this information. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Get your Medicare questions answered by licensed professionals: http://medicare.com _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Get quotes and compare plans now at: http://www.ehealthmedicare.com
Просмотров: 447 eHealth
Know Your Medicare Travel Benefits
 
01:12
If you travel outside of the United States, there are typically Medicare Supplement plans that cover the cost of medical services you receive while you're in another country. Make sure you ask about those benefits when you’re shopping for plans. If you’re a snowbird – you’re on Medicare and live in two different states at different times of the year – you should also feel confident that your Medicare supplement plan covers the cost of your care in both states. On the flip-side, Medicare Advantage plans treat travel very differently. With Medicare Advantage, if you’re traveling out of state, it’s a good idea to call your agent, or your insurance company before you travel, to figure out how your plan handles out-of-state or out-of-network coverage. And, if you’re traveling internationally with Medicare Advantage, it’s a good idea to investigate travel health insurance plans.
Просмотров: 840 eHealth
Health Insurance Made Simple
 
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The creator behind this awesome piece of animation is PopTent creator, Robot (not his given name). We thought the animation he created was outstanding and that it did a terrific job of simply and creatively stating our value proposition.
Просмотров: 2067 eHealth
Can I apply for health insurance if I'm unemployed, or lose Cobra coverage, under Obamacare?
 
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If you've lost your job, changes in your job, or your 18-months of COBRA coverage have run out, you are able to apply for new coverage in the individual insurance market under the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare. The next annual open enrollment period -- when anyone can add or change their health coverage - is currently scheduled to begin on November 15 of this year. Outside of open enrollment, the Affordable Care Act deems these types of changes in your access to health coverage to be qualifying events, which trigger a Special Enrollment Period. A Special Enrollment Period gives you 60 days from the date of your qualifying event to apply for a new health plan. When you apply for your new coverage, it's a good idea to have some proof of your loss or change in health coverage, such as a letter of termination from your employer or a copy of your coverage termination letter from your prior health plan -- just in case your new insurance company requires them for verification. As long as you apply for new coverage within 60-days, your application for new health coverage cannot be declined. Be aware that all new major medical heath plans provide certain popular benefits with no out of pocket costs like: - Dietary counseling and screenings for weight management - Tobacco and alcohol screenings, counseling and help quitting - And recommended mental health and illness prevention tests and screenings -- to name a few If you miss your 60-day Special Enrollment Period, you may not be able to enroll in a major medical health plan until the next open enrollment period. And, it's likely your coverage could not begin before January 1 of next year. If you miss the 60-day deadline, we encourage you to look at short-term health coverage as an alternative, to gain some measure of protection until you're eligible to apply for major medical coverage again during the Open Enrollment Period. Short-term coverage does not meet the requirements of Obamacare, so you may still be subject to a tax penalty. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Get quotes and compare plans now at: https://www.ehealth.com
Просмотров: 3715 eHealth
What is a Medical Insurance Package from eHealth?
 
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Health care in America can be complicated… With all of the disruption, finding something you can actually afford is harder now than ever. That’s why eHealth has started to offer low-cost medical insurance packages… What’s a medical insurance package? Great question. Medical insurance packages combine supplemental insurance products together, sometimes with other types of products, so that a customer can apply for insurance in a single process. With each package look to provide three key benefits: -- the first is catastrophic coverage for large medical bills; -- the second is coverage for certain out-of-pocket costs, so you’re not crushed by a night in the hospital or a ride in an ambulance -- the third is coverage for certain routine medical care, like a certain number of visits to the doctor. We also give you the option to add other products, such as telemedicine benefits and discount cards for prescription drugs, as well as dental and vision insurance.   Whenever possible, we work with one insurance company to offer these benefits in a single package, often at about half the typical cost of a major medical or “Obamacare“ health plan. Why do these plans cost less than Obamacare plans? Because they provide fewer benefits than Obamacare plans. They may be a great fit for people who do not want or cannot afford the full set of benefits of getting an Obamacare plan. But, you need to be aware of their limitations. In most states you’ll find a medical insurance package with the eHealth logo on it. When you see our logo, that means we’ve built the entire package with one insurance company providing each of the products in the package. You could buy these insurance policies separately at eHealth.com, for the same price. BUT, buying a package from a single insurance company can make it easier for you to file a claim, coordinate benefits, and get reimbursed. And, if you ever have problems,  you’ve only got one insurance company to call. AND… if that doesn’t work,  you can call us - as you’re broker, we’re your advocate whenever you’re not getting what you need from your health plan… At eHealth we know health insurance is useless if you can’t afford it. Whether you need a major medical plan, or a medical insurance package that fits your budget, let our team at eHealth help you find coverage that’s right for you. Come to our website or speak with our telephone representatives to learn more about the important differences between a medical insurance package and a major medical plan to see which one is right for you. eHealth.com – We make health insurance easy.
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5 benefits of short term health insurance
 
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"Top 5 benefits of short-term (for those buying to fill a short-term gap in coverage) 1. They start quickly – In some instances, you can have short-term coverage in place within 24 hours. 2. They're affordable – Between April and June of 2014, the average individual eHealth customer paid $107 per month, on average, for short-term coverage – although short-term coverage is more limited. 3. They cover emergencies – Most short-term health plans are designed primarily to provide you with coverage and protection from unexpected injuries and illnesses that require emergency medical care. 4. They satisfy many non-government requirements for insurance – If you need to verify that you have health insurance for travel, or in order to get admitted to certain types of schools, like nursing or dental schools, short-term plans often satisfy those coverage requirements. 5. You can cancel at anytime - When you apply for short-term health insurance, you’ll typically have the option to pay for your coverage all at once, or you can pay month-to-month. If you pay month-to-month, its very easy to cancel your plan at any time. " _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Get quotes and compare plans now at: https://www.ehealth.com
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How Do I Get Small Business Health Insurance Quotes?
 
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To learn more about how you can apply for Small Business Health Insurance, visit: https://www.ehealthinsurance.com/small-business-health-insurance?allid=sma6506000 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Follow eHealth at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/eHealth
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